hackberry


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hack·ber·ry

 (hăk′bĕr′ē)
n.
1. Any of various trees or shrubs of the genus Celtis, having inconspicuous flowers and small, usually ovoid drupes.
2. The fruit of such a plant.
3. The soft yellowish wood of any of these trees or shrubs.

[Alteration of obsolete hagberry, hegberry : hag-, heg-, hackberry (from Old Norse heggr) + berry.]

hackberry

(ˈhækˌbɛrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Plants) any American tree or shrub of the ulmaceous genus Celtis, having edible cherry-like fruits
2. (Plants) the fruit or soft yellowish wood of such a tree
[C18: variant of C16 hagberry, of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse heggr hackberry]

hack•ber•ry

(ˈhækˌbɛr i, -bə ri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. any of several trees or shrubs of the genus Celtis, of the elm family, bearing cherrylike fruit.
2. the sometimes edible fruit of such a tree.
3. the wood of such a tree.
[1775–85, Amer.; variant of hagberry < Scandinavian]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hackberry - any of various trees of the genus Celtis having inconspicuous flowers and small berrylike fruitshackberry - any of various trees of the genus Celtis having inconspicuous flowers and small berrylike fruits
Celtis, genus Celtis - large genus of trees and shrubs with berrylike fruit
Celtis australis, European hackberry, Mediterranean hackberry - bright green deciduous shade tree of southern Europe
American hackberry, Celtis occidentalis - large deciduous shade tree of southern United States with small deep purple berries
Celtis laevigata, sugarberry - deciduous shade tree with small black berries; southern United States; yields soft yellowish wood
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
2.hackberry - small edible dark purple to black berry with large pits; southern United States
berry - any of numerous small and pulpy edible fruits; used as desserts or in making jams and jellies and preserves
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract notice: development of the hackberry way in marseille 13014
The West Hackberry 3D multi-client seismic survey is north of TGS' Loyal 3D Complex in the Anadarko Basin.
The settlement agreement is with respect to CB&I's three-train LNG liquefaction project in Hackberry, Louisiana through CCJV, a joint venture with Chiyoda International Corporation.
A woman taking a boat cruise through the Calcasieu Ship Channel, near Hackberry, with her husband had (http://www.
UMR floodplain forest is primarily composed of silver maple, green ash, and American elm, with cottonwood, black willow, river birch, swamp white oak, hackberry (Celtis occidentalis), and box elder (Acer negundo) common in some areas (Knutson and Klaas, 1998; Urich et al, 2002).
PENDLETON - A hackberry tree in a Pendleton cemetery has been recorded as the largest of its kind in Oregon.
Building her PhD work around the hackberry tree, she realized that she was actually studying a plant that had a mineral inside the seed.
It was fruit that I had collected more than 20 years ago, as part of my dissertation research, which was to study the mineralisation processes within the hackberry (Celtis occidentalis) seed.
Sempra Energy is investing $10 billion into the Hackberry project, while the Freeport plant will require $11 billion of private capital.
The riparian zone is classified as interior riparian deciduous forest (Brown, 1982) and is dominated by sycamore and netleaf hackberry (Celtis reticulata), which occur in lower-elevation areas of the canyon.
Top it all off with the fact that my farm produces sufficient Osage orange, hackberry, locust and walnut windfalls to keep my home fire burning--dreams really can come true.
punctulatus on the top surfaces of the lower leaves of common hackberry (Celtis occidentalis L.