had


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had

 (hăd)
v.
Past tense and past participle of have.

had

(hæd)
vb
the past tense and past participle of have

have

(hæv; unstressed həv, əv; for 26 usually hæf)

v.andauxiliary v., pres. sing. 1stand2nd pers. have, v.t.
1. to possess; own; hold for use; contain: I have property. The work has an index.
2. to accept in some relation: He wants to marry her, if she'll have him.
3. to get; receive; take: to have a part in a play; to have news.
4. to experience, undergo, or endure: Have a good time. He had a heart attack.
5. to hold in mind, sight, etc.: to have doubts.
6. to cause to, as by command or invitation: Have him come here at five.
7. to be in a certain relation to: She has three cousins.
8. to show or exhibit in action or words: She had the crust to refuse my invitation.
9. to be identified or distinguished by; possess the characteristic of: This wood has a silky texture.
10. to engage in; carry on: to have a talk; to have a fight.
11. to partake of; eat or drink: We had cake for dessert.
12. to permit; allow: I will not have any talking during the concert.
13. to assert or represent as being: Rumor has it that she's moving.
14. to give birth to; beget: to have a baby.
15. to hold an advantage over: He has you there.
16. to outwit; deceive; cheat: We realized we'd been had by a con artist.
17. to control or possess through bribery; bribe.
18. to gain possession of: There is none to be had at that price.
19. to hold or put in a certain position or situation: The problem had me stumped.
20. to exercise; display: Have pity on them.
21. to invite or cause to be present as a companion or guest: We had Evelyn over for dinner.
22. to engage in sexual intercourse with.
23. to know or be skilled in: to have neither Latin nor Greek.
v.i.
24. to be in possession of money or wealth: those who have and those who have not.
auxiliary verb.
25. (used with a past participle to form perfect tenses): She has gone. I would have felt better if the hotel had cost less.
26. to be required, compelled, or under obligation (fol. by infinitival to, with or without a main verb): I have to leave now.
27. have at, to attack with vigor.
n.
28. one that has wealth, social position, or other material benefits.
Idioms:
1. have done, to cease; finish.
2. have had it,
a. to be tired and disgusted: I've had it with your excuses.
b. to be ready for discarding, as something shabby, old, or no longer useful or popular.
3. have it coming, to deserve whatever good or ill fortune one receives.
4. have it in for, to wish harm to.
5. have it out, to reach an understanding through fighting or intense discussion.
6. have to do with,
a. to be connected or associated with: Your ambition had a lot to do with your success.
b. to deal with; be concerned with.
[before 900; Middle English haven,habben, Old English habban, c. Old Saxon hebbian, Old High German habēn, Old Norse hafa, Gothic haban]
usage: See of.
Translations

had

[ˈhæd](STRONG) [həd]
pt of have
pp of have
you've been had! → tu t'es fait avoir!

have

(hӕv) 3rd person singular present tense has (hӕz) : past tense, past participle had (hӕd) : short forms I've (ӕiv) (I have), you've (juːv) (you have), he's (hiːz) (he has), she's (ʃiːz) (she has), it's (its) (it has), we've (wiːv) (we have), they've (ðeiv) (they have), I'd (aid) (I had), you'd (juːd) (you had), he'd (hiːd) (he had), she'd (ʃiːd) (she had), it'd (ˈitəd) (it had), we'd (wiːd) (we had), they'd (ðeid) (they had): negative short forms hadn't (ˈhӕdnt) (had not), hasn't (ˈhӕznt) (has not), haven't (ˈhӕvnt) (have not) – verb
1. used with past participle of other verbs to show that an action is in the indefinite past and has been completed. I've bought a new dictionary; Has he gone yet?.
2. (also have got) to hold or possess (something which belongs to oneself or to someone else). I have a book of yours at home; He's got your book; I don't have any books by Sir Walter Scott.
3. (also have got) to possess something as part of oneself or in some way connected with oneself. She has blue eyes; Our house has six rooms; I've got a pain in my stomach.
4. (sometimes with back) to receive or get. Have you had any news of your brother?; Thank you for lending me the book – you can have it back next week.
5. to produce. He does have some good ideas; She has had a baby.
6. to cause to be done. I'm having a tooth (taken) out; Have Smith come and see me.
7. to enjoy or suffer. We had a lovely holiday.
8. to do or take. I'll have a drink; Let me have a try.
9. to allow. I will not have you wearing clothes like that!
10. (with back, ~in, ~round etc) to ask to one's house as a guest or to do a job. We're having friends round for dinner; We're having someone in to paint this room.
11. to think or feel. I have some doubts about this project.
12. to trick. You've been had!
ˈhas-been noun
a person who is no longer famous and important.
have done with
to stop or put an end to. Let's have done with all this quarrelling.
have had it
to be dead, ruined etc. The bullet went into his brain – he's had it, I'm afraid.
have it in oneself etc
to have the courage or ability to do something. I hear she told her boss to stop shouting at her – I didn't think she had it in her.
have it out (often with with)
to argue with (a person) in order to put an end to some disagreement. I'm going to have it out with her once and for all.
have on
1. (also have got on) to wear. That's a nice suit you have on.
2. to fool (someone). You're having me on – that's not really true, is it?
3. (also have got on) to be busy with. Have you (got) anything on this afternoon?
have to (also have got to)
to be obliged to (do something). I don't want to do this, but I have to; Do you have to go so soon?; I've got to leave soon; You didn't have to do that, did you?
have to do with (a person or thing) , (also have got to do with)
to be of importance or concern to (a person or thing). What have these letters to do with you?; Your remarks have (got) nothing to do with the subject we are discussing.
have up (usually with for)
to make (a person) appear in court to answer some charge. He was had up for drunken driving.
have what it takes , (also have got what it takes)
to have the qualities or ability that one needs to do something. He has (got) what it takes to make a good officer.
I have it! , (also I've got it!)
I have found the answer (to a problem etc).

had

pret & pp de have
References in classic literature ?
Mr Western had an estate in this parish; and as his house stood at little greater distance from this church than from his own, he very often came to Divine Service here; and both he and the charming Sophia happened to be present at this time.
He accordingly endeavored to purchase horses for the journey, but in this he had to contend with the sordid disposition of these people.
Others rather inclined to the belief that he had projected some distant tour, and was at present occupied in effecting the preliminary arrangements; but this again was stoutly denied by Sam himself, who had unequivocally stated, when cross-examined by Mary, that no new journeys were to be undertaken.
When I took leave of this island, I carried on board, for relics, the great goat-skin cap I had made, my umbrella, and one of my parrots; also, I forgot not to take the money I formerly mentioned, which had lain by me so long useless that it was grown rusty or tarnished, and could hardly pass for silver till it had been a little rubbed and handled, as also the money I found in the wreck of the Spanish ship.
My son, sir," said the old man, after securing the drawbridge, "rather had it in his mind that you might happen to drop in, and he left word that he would soon be home from his afternoon's walk.
Whilst the burghers of the Hague were tearing in pieces the bodies of John and Cornelius de Witt, and whilst William of Orange, after having made sure that his two antagonists were really dead, was galloping over the Leyden road, followed by Captain van Deken, whom he found a little too compassionate to honour him any longer with his confidence, Craeke, the faithful servant, mounted on a good horse, and little suspecting what terrible events had taken place since his departure, proceeded along the high road lined with trees, until he was clear of the town and the neighbouring villages.
Lady Dorothea had not left us long before another visitor as unexpected a one as her Ladyship, was announced.
I embarked in March, 1622, in the same fleet with the Count Vidigueira, on whom the king had conferred the viceroyship of the Indies, then vacant by the resignation of Alfonso Noronha, whose unsuccessful voyage in the foregoing year had been the occasion of the loss of Ormus, which being by the miscarriage of that fleet deprived of the succours necessary for its defence, was taken by the Persians and English.
Nothing was ready for the war that everyone expected and to prepare for which the Emperor had come from Petersburg.
But the important point to notice, is that these cells are always made at that degree of nearness to each other, that they would have intersected or broken into each other, if the spheres had been completed; but this is never permitted, the bees building perfectly flat walls of wax between the spheres which thus tend to intersect.
For these reasons Louis the Twelfth, King of France, quickly occupied Milan, and as quickly lost it; and to turn him out the first time it only needed Lodovico's own forces; because those who had opened the gates to him, finding themselves deceived in their hopes of future benefit, would not endure the ill-treatment of the new prince.
They had been seen on the Tower Wharf that morning, embarking on board the steamer bound for Rotterdam.