had


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had

 (hăd)
v.
Past tense and past participle of have.

had

(hæd)
vb
the past tense and past participle of have

have

(hæv; unstressed həv, əv; for 26 usually hæf)

v.andauxiliary v., pres. sing. 1stand2nd pers. have, v.t.
1. to possess; own; hold for use; contain: I have property. The work has an index.
2. to accept in some relation: He wants to marry her, if she'll have him.
3. to get; receive; take: to have a part in a play; to have news.
4. to experience, undergo, or endure: Have a good time. He had a heart attack.
5. to hold in mind, sight, etc.: to have doubts.
6. to cause to, as by command or invitation: Have him come here at five.
7. to be in a certain relation to: She has three cousins.
8. to show or exhibit in action or words: She had the crust to refuse my invitation.
9. to be identified or distinguished by; possess the characteristic of: This wood has a silky texture.
10. to engage in; carry on: to have a talk; to have a fight.
11. to partake of; eat or drink: We had cake for dessert.
12. to permit; allow: I will not have any talking during the concert.
13. to assert or represent as being: Rumor has it that she's moving.
14. to give birth to; beget: to have a baby.
15. to hold an advantage over: He has you there.
16. to outwit; deceive; cheat: We realized we'd been had by a con artist.
17. to control or possess through bribery; bribe.
18. to gain possession of: There is none to be had at that price.
19. to hold or put in a certain position or situation: The problem had me stumped.
20. to exercise; display: Have pity on them.
21. to invite or cause to be present as a companion or guest: We had Evelyn over for dinner.
22. to engage in sexual intercourse with.
23. to know or be skilled in: to have neither Latin nor Greek.
v.i.
24. to be in possession of money or wealth: those who have and those who have not.
auxiliary verb.
25. (used with a past participle to form perfect tenses): She has gone. I would have felt better if the hotel had cost less.
26. to be required, compelled, or under obligation (fol. by infinitival to, with or without a main verb): I have to leave now.
27. have at, to attack with vigor.
n.
28. one that has wealth, social position, or other material benefits.
Idioms:
1. have done, to cease; finish.
2. have had it,
a. to be tired and disgusted: I've had it with your excuses.
b. to be ready for discarding, as something shabby, old, or no longer useful or popular.
3. have it coming, to deserve whatever good or ill fortune one receives.
4. have it in for, to wish harm to.
5. have it out, to reach an understanding through fighting or intense discussion.
6. have to do with,
a. to be connected or associated with: Your ambition had a lot to do with your success.
b. to deal with; be concerned with.
[before 900; Middle English haven,habben, Old English habban, c. Old Saxon hebbian, Old High German habēn, Old Norse hafa, Gothic haban]
usage: See of.
Translations

had

[ˈhæd](STRONG) [həd]
pt of have
pp of have
you've been had! → tu t'es fait avoir!

have

(hӕv) 3rd person singular present tense has (hӕz) : past tense, past participle had (hӕd) : short forms I've (ӕiv) (I have), you've (juːv) (you have), he's (hiːz) (he has), she's (ʃiːz) (she has), it's (its) (it has), we've (wiːv) (we have), they've (ðeiv) (they have), I'd (aid) (I had), you'd (juːd) (you had), he'd (hiːd) (he had), she'd (ʃiːd) (she had), it'd (ˈitəd) (it had), we'd (wiːd) (we had), they'd (ðeid) (they had): negative short forms hadn't (ˈhӕdnt) (had not), hasn't (ˈhӕznt) (has not), haven't (ˈhӕvnt) (have not) – verb
1. used with past participle of other verbs to show that an action is in the indefinite past and has been completed. I've bought a new dictionary; Has he gone yet?.
2. (also have got) to hold or possess (something which belongs to oneself or to someone else). I have a book of yours at home; He's got your book; I don't have any books by Sir Walter Scott.
3. (also have got) to possess something as part of oneself or in some way connected with oneself. She has blue eyes; Our house has six rooms; I've got a pain in my stomach.
4. (sometimes with back) to receive or get. Have you had any news of your brother?; Thank you for lending me the book – you can have it back next week.
5. to produce. He does have some good ideas; She has had a baby.
6. to cause to be done. I'm having a tooth (taken) out; Have Smith come and see me.
7. to enjoy or suffer. We had a lovely holiday.
8. to do or take. I'll have a drink; Let me have a try.
9. to allow. I will not have you wearing clothes like that!
10. (with back, ~in, ~round etc) to ask to one's house as a guest or to do a job. We're having friends round for dinner; We're having someone in to paint this room.
11. to think or feel. I have some doubts about this project.
12. to trick. You've been had!
ˈhas-been noun
a person who is no longer famous and important.
have done with
to stop or put an end to. Let's have done with all this quarrelling.
have had it
to be dead, ruined etc. The bullet went into his brain – he's had it, I'm afraid.
have it in oneself etc
to have the courage or ability to do something. I hear she told her boss to stop shouting at her – I didn't think she had it in her.
have it out (often with with)
to argue with (a person) in order to put an end to some disagreement. I'm going to have it out with her once and for all.
have on
1. (also have got on) to wear. That's a nice suit you have on.
2. to fool (someone). You're having me on – that's not really true, is it?
3. (also have got on) to be busy with. Have you (got) anything on this afternoon?
have to (also have got to)
to be obliged to (do something). I don't want to do this, but I have to; Do you have to go so soon?; I've got to leave soon; You didn't have to do that, did you?
have to do with (a person or thing) , (also have got to do with)
to be of importance or concern to (a person or thing). What have these letters to do with you?; Your remarks have (got) nothing to do with the subject we are discussing.
have up (usually with for)
to make (a person) appear in court to answer some charge. He was had up for drunken driving.
have what it takes , (also have got what it takes)
to have the qualities or ability that one needs to do something. He has (got) what it takes to make a good officer.
I have it! , (also I've got it!)
I have found the answer (to a problem etc).

had

pret & pp de have
References in classic literature ?
Don't you wish we had the money Papa lost when we were little, Jo?
She had a decided mouth, a comical nose, and sharp, gray eyes, which appeared to see everything, and were by turns fierce, funny, or thoughtful.
Somehow the sight of the old shoes had a good effect upon the girls, for Mother was coming, and everyone brightened to welcome her.
It's the best we've had yet," said Meg, as the dead villain sat up and rubbed his elbows.
His mother, Louise Bentley, the girl who came into the world on that night when Jesse ran through the fields crying to God that he be given a son, had grown to womanhood on the farm and had married young John Hardy of Wines- burg, who became a banker.
If a pedestrian got in her way she drove straight ahead and the frightened citizen had to es- cape as best he could.
His eyes were brown and as a child he had a habit of looking at things and people a long time without appearing to see what he was looking at.
Often he wished that he would never have to go back to town and once when he had come home from the farm after a long visit, something happened that had a lasting effect on his mind.
Tom Swift, who had been slowly looking through the pages of a magazine, in the contents of which he seemed to be deeply interested, turned the final folio, ruffled the sheets back again to look at a certain map and drawing, and then, slapping the book down on a table before him, with a noise not unlike that of a shot, exclaimed:
He stopped and looked at the magazine he had so hastily slapped down.
But this isn't that," and Tom picked up the magazine and leafed it to find the article he had been reading.
The Mayas had a peculiar civilization of their own, thousands of years ago, and their calendar system was so involved "