haematology

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Related to haematologists: hematologists

haematology

(ˌhɛm-; ˌhiːməˈtɒlədʒɪ) or

hematology

n
(Medicine) the branch of medical science concerned with diseases of the blood and blood-forming tissues
haematologic, hematologic, ˌhaematoˈlogical, ˌhematoˈlogical adj
ˌhaemaˈtologist, ˌhemaˈtologist n

hematology, haematology

the branch of medical science that studies the morphology of the blood and blood-forming tissues. — hematologist, haematologist, n.hematologie, haematologic, hematological, haematological, adj.
See also: Blood and Blood Vessels
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.haematology - the branch of medicine that deals with diseases of the blood and blood-forming organshaematology - the branch of medicine that deals with diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
Translations

haematology

hematology (US) [ˌhiːməˈtɒlədʒɪ] Nhematología f

haematology

[ˌhiːməˈtɒlədʒi] hematology (US) nhématologie f

haematology

, (US) hematology
nHämatologie f

haematology

hematology (Am) [ˌhiːməˈtɒlədʒɪ] nematologia
References in periodicals archive ?
KARACHI -- Haematologists in particular and doctors in general have urged Karachiites to translate their spirit to donate blood for victims of natural calamities into a strong culture.
Haematologists are also experts on cancer of the blood (leukaemia) and on blood clotting problems such as haemophilia.
It is literally vital for patients that any new EU legislation should improve co-operation for more and better-targeted funding for research in haematology, allowing haematologists to secure the research resources they need to help patients access the best possible expertise and treatment.
Before that time haematologists could either train as haematological pathologists, or as paediatricians or physicians.
The pioneering move using umbilical cords by haematologists at Heartlands Hospital is giving new hope to blood cancer patients, many of whom have died because they were unable to find a bone marrow donor.
His daughter Elaine Williams said: "We just wanted to say thank you to the consultant and the haematologists.
The service we provide to the patient is no different than if we had a medical oncologist and we believe it is better to have haematologists, who have a much wider range of skills.