haematoma

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Related to haematomas: oedema

haematoma

(ˌhiːməˈtəʊmə; ˌhɛm-) or

hematoma

n, pl -mas or -mata (-mətə)
(Pathology) pathol a tumour of clotted or partially clotted blood
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.haematoma - a localized swelling filled with blood
intumescence, intumescency - swelling up with blood or other fluids (as with congestion)
Translations

haematoma

hematoma (US) [ˌhiːməˈtəʊmə] N (haematomas or haematomata (pl)) [ˌhiməˈtəʊmətə]hematoma m

haematoma

, (US) hematoma
n pl <-mas or -mata> → Hämatom nt (spec), → Bluterguss m
References in periodicals archive ?
Most patients have single haematomas but there had been few cases of multiple hematomas as reported in literature (5).
Patients with small non-expanding haematomas should be observed in a high acuity setting and resolution radiographically assessed frequently.
Hyperacute haematomas are hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging and DWI because of the T2 shine-through phenomenon.
But the new research shows that the haemorrhages, known as subdural haematomas, resolve themselves quickly and soon become undetectable.
Haematomas can heal by themselves, but the blood is a good breeding area for bacteria and the ear will be deformed by scar tissue as it heals.
Rowin J, Lewis SL: Spontaneous bilateral subdural haematomas associated with chronic ginkgo biloba ingestion.
Conservative management may be appropriate in patients with non expanding haematomas that show improvement on serial CT.
However, large haematomas may occur even if coagulation of the patients is normal, and this may be fatal if unrecognised (3,4).
Enclosed haematomas of the neck are relatively rare; occurring secondary to often trivial precipitating factors, occasionally with fatal outcomes.
Buxton and colleagues reported many possible complications from neuroendoscopy including delay in awakening, pneumocephalus, transient anisocoria, transient hemiparesis, cerebral infarction, transient fever, meningism, infection, short-term memory loss, diabetes insipidus, inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, transient cerebrospinal fluid leaks, chronic subdural haematomas, traumatic basilar artery aneurysm and hydrocephalus (1).
Spinal subdural haematomas occur less commonly than spinal epidural haematomas (14,15).
From your description, the condition is suggestive of an ear haematoma, which is a fluid-filled swelling that develops on the ear flaps of dogs.