haggard

(redirected from haggardness)
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hag·gard

 (hăg′ərd)
adj.
1. Exhausted or distraught and often gaunt in appearance.
2. Wild and intractable. Used of a hawk in falconry.
n.
An adult hawk captured for training.

[French hagard, wild, from Old French, wild hawk, raptor, perhaps of Germanic origin.]

hag′gard·ly adv.
hag′gard·ness n.

haggard

(ˈhæɡəd)
adj
1. careworn or gaunt, as from lack of sleep, anxiety, or starvation
2. wild or unruly
3. (Falconry) (of a hawk) having reached maturity in the wild before being caught
n
(Falconry) falconry a hawk that has reached maturity before being caught. Compare eyas, passage hawk
[C16: from Old French hagard wild; perhaps related to hedge]
ˈhaggardly adv
ˈhaggardness n

haggard

(ˈhæɡərd)
n
(Agriculture) (in Ireland and the Isle of Man) an enclosure beside a farmhouse in which crops are stored
[C16: related to Old Norse heygarthr, from hey hay + garthr yard]

Haggard

(ˈhæɡəd)
n
(Biography) Sir (Henry) Rider. 1856–1925, British author of romantic adventure stories, including King Solomon's Mines (1885)

hag•gard

(ˈhæg ərd)

adj.
1. gaunt, wasted, or exhausted in appearance, as from prolonged suffering or strain; worn: the haggard faces of refugees.
2. wild; wild-looking.
[1560–70; orig., wild female hawk. See hag1, -ard]
hag′gard•ly, adv.
hag′gard•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.haggard - British writer noted for romantic adventure novels (1856-1925)Haggard - British writer noted for romantic adventure novels (1856-1925)
Adj.1.haggard - showing the wearing effects of overwork or care or sufferinghaggard - showing the wearing effects of overwork or care or suffering; "looking careworn as she bent over her mending"; "her face was drawn and haggard from sleeplessness"; "that raddled but still noble face"; "shocked to see the worn look of his handsome young face"- Charles Dickens
tired - depleted of strength or energy; "tired mothers with crying babies"; "too tired to eat"
2.haggard - very thin especially from disease or hunger or cold; "emaciated bony hands"; "a nightmare population of gaunt men and skeletal boys"; "eyes were haggard and cavernous"; "small pinched faces"; "kept life in his wasted frame only by grim concentration"
lean, thin - lacking excess flesh; "you can't be too rich or too thin"; "Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look"-Shakespeare

haggard

haggard

adjective
Pale and exhausted, as because of worry or sleeplessness:
Translations
هَزيل وَمُنْهَك
ztrhaný
udkørt
hurja
bijedandivljioronuo
nyúzott
gugginn
やつれた
sumenkęs
izvārdzisnomocīts

haggard

[ˈhægəd] ADJ (from tiredness) → ojeroso; (= unwell, unhealthy) → demacrado, macilento

haggard

[ˈhægərd] adj (= drawn, careworn) [person] → exténué(e); [face, features] → défait(e)

haggard

adjausgezehrt; (from tiredness) → abgespannt; (from worry) → abgehärmt, verhärmt; he had a very haggard expression throughout the trialer wirkte während der ganzen Verhandlung sehr mitgenommen

haggard

[ˈhægəd] adj (careworn) → tirato/a; (gaunt) → smunto/a

haggard

(ˈhӕgəd) adjective
(of a person) looking very tired and thin-faced, because of pain, worry etc. She looked haggard after a sleepless night.

haggard

a. ojeroso-a; desfigurado-a; desaliñado-a.
References in classic literature ?
Woodcourt was in his presence for some moments without being perceived, and he told me that he never could forget the haggardness of his face and the dejection of his manner before he was aroused from his dream.
In that flashing glimpse, even as he reined and spurred to make his own horse leap sidewise out from under, Harley Kennan observed the scratched skin and torn clothing, the wild-burning eyes, and the haggardness under the scraggly growth of beard, of the man-hunted man.
He had the air of a stranger; and seemed, by a certain haggardness in his look, as well as by the dusty soils on his dress, to have travelled some distance.