hagiography

(redirected from hagiographies)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

hag·i·og·ra·phy

 (hăg′ē-ŏg′rə-fē, hā′jē-)
n. pl. hag·i·og·ra·phies
1.
a. The writing of the lives of saints.
b. A biography of a saint.
2.
a. The writing of an admiring or idealized biography.
b. An admiring or idealized biography.

hag′i·og′raph·er n.
hag′i·o·graph′ic (-ə-grăf′ĭk), hag′i·o·graph′i·cal adj.

hagiography

(ˌhæɡɪˈɒɡrəfɪ)
n, pl -phies
1. (Theology) the writing of the lives of the saints
2. (Theology) biography of the saints
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) any biography that idealizes or idolizes its subject
hagiographic, ˌhagioˈgraphical adj

hag•i•og•ra•phy

(ˌhæg iˈɒg rə fi, ˌheɪ dʒi-)

n., pl. -phies.
the writing and critical study of the lives of the saints.
[1805–15]
hag`i•o•graph′ic (-əˈgræf ɪk) hag`i•o•graph′i•cal, adj.

hagiography

the writing and critical study of the lives of the saints; hagiology. — hagiographer, n. — hagiographic, hagiographical, adj.
See also: Saints
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hagiography - a biography that idealizes or idolizes the person (especially a person who is a saint)
biography, life history, life story, life - an account of the series of events making up a person's life
Translations

hagiography

[ˌhægɪˈɒgrəfɪ] Nhagiografía f

hagiography

n (lit, fig)Hagiografie f; (lit also)Heiligengeschichte f
References in periodicals archive ?
From hagiographies to literary descriptions of sacred paintings to treatises on relics and theurgy, Professor Miller examines a wide variety of ancient texts to reveal how Christian writers increasingly described the matter of the world as invested with divine power.
While focusing on one of the few laymen to become a saint in the Middle Ages, the study takes on a variety of issues regarding, not only the value of hagiographies as historical sources, but also the importance of understanding what has 'been lost'.
Hagerty's succinct essay on the hagiographies of Guru Nanak is an interesting look at the creation and replication of a historiographical paradigm within the Sikh tradition.
In his series Hagiographies, Palminteri collected old statues and applied coats of brightly colored paint to transform religious icons into heroic figures such as Superman, Batman, Captain America, and The Flash.
Hagiographies deal with motivation, faith, trust, enthusiastic endeavor--the aspects of wisdom that arise from specific practices, and the benefits such practices bring for one's self and others.
Part one consists of five chapters that show that these hagiographies adhere to a narrative arc encompassing all stages of life and religious experience.
He analyzes hagiographies, places them in their historical context, relates these stories to popular culture as well as patterns in the earlier Christian tradition, and then determines what purposes the animal stories serve.
This analysis unites Twain's tale to the deep structure of fairytales, epics, and hagiographies and emphasizes Twain as storyteller: "Twain is no official hagiographer, but a storyteller returning the form to its folk roots" (118).
In this exhaustively researched, tightly written, rigorous critical study of the life of Saint Rose of Lima, Frank Graziano carefully elaborates the cultural and historical issues that surrounded Saint Rose's life, beatification, canonization, and longlasting legend as told through varied hagiographies and archival documents.
Though these personal interludes are short and sweet, they're as cannily designed as one of those candidate hagiographies political conventions show.
Looking at Church hagiographies about early Christian female martyrs shows that conflicted, ambivalent thinking about their sister Christians continued in the minds and hearts of the Christian men who set down their stories.
Matthew Ritchie is a self-professed cosmologist, a connoisseur of information structures whose templates include action painting, superstring theory, medieval hagiographies, molecular biology, and comic books.