halachic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to halachic: Halakhah

Ha·la·cha

or Ha·la·khah also Ha·la·kah  (hä′lä-KHä′, hä-lä′KHə, -lô′-)
n. Judaism
The legal part of Talmudic literature, an interpretation of the laws of the Scriptures.

[Hebrew hălākâ, rule, tradition, from hālak, to go; see hlk in Semitic roots.]

Ha·lach′ic (hə-lä′KHĭk) adj.

halachic

,

halakhic

or

halakic

adj
(Judaism) Judaism relating to or connected with the Halacha
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Ram Zahavi, director of Religious Education in the Education Ministry, said religious schools go by the halachic rulings of the rabbinate, which state that girls should not enlist in the army.
Goshen-Gottstein's study highlights the points that, on the one hand, medieval rabbinic conceptualizations of Avoda Zara which were developed in response to Christianity cannot be mechanically applied in halachic rulings to Hindu universes, and, on the other hand, the ongoing encounters with Hinduism can surprisingly illuminate certain dimensions of Jewish thought.
Unless a woman obtains a halachic divorce ("get") from her first husband, any children of another relationship would be considered mamzers, illegitimate, and unable to marry into any other Jewish family.
But US courts have indeed cited provisions of Islamic Sharia law, and Jewish Halachic law and other countries' laws.
Questions of marital obligations, Halachic status, but no requests for a, eh, reversal of it," he said.
Incidentally, the ministers from the religious parties were aware that the Law of Return had no direct bearing on legal interpretations of Halachic definitions and, apparently, this was also why they accepted Ben-Gurion's view.
Jewish activism that operates under the halachic commandments is destined to achieve 'tikkun olam'.
JERUSALEM: The Mishna, the Talmud and Halachic literature all mention a legal innovation by the Sages, contradicting a Biblical Law, which stipulates that a person must restore that which he took by robbery to its original owners (Leviticus 5, 23).
Fifty influential Jewish rabbinic leaders on Tuesday released a controversial Halachic (traditional compendium of Jewish Law) ruling forbidding Jews from selling or renting homes to gentiles in predominantly Jewish areas in Israel.
Scholars of Jewish culture and practitioners of philanthropy cover sociology and history, orthodoxy and federations, halachic perspectives, new thinking for a changing philanthropic climate, and the role of the rabbi in the fiscal health of his congregation.