hale


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Related to hale: Nathan Hale, hale and hearty

hale 1

 (hāl)
adj. hal·er, hal·est
Free from infirmity or illness; sound. See Synonyms at healthy.

[Middle English, from Old English hāl; see kailo- in Indo-European roots.]

hale′ness n.

hale 2

 (hāl)
tr.v. haled, hal·ing, hales
1. To compel to go: "In short order the human rights campaign was haled before a high court of indignation" (Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.).
2. Archaic To pull, draw, drag, or hoist.

[Middle English halen, to pull, drag, from Old French haler, of Germanic origin; see kelə- in Indo-European roots.]

hale

(heɪl)
adj
1. healthy and robust (esp in the phrase hale and hearty)
2. dialect Scot and Northern English whole
[Old English hæl whole]
ˈhaleness n

hale

(heɪl)
vb
(tr) to pull or drag; haul
[C13: from Old French haler, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German halōn to fetch, Old English geholian to acquire]
ˈhaler n

Hale

(heɪl)
n
1. (Biography) George Ellery. 1868–1938, US astronomer: undertook research into sunspots and invented the spectroheliograph
2. (Biography) Sir Matthew. 1609–76, English judge and scholar; Lord Chief Justice (1671–76)

hale1

(heɪl)

adj. hal•er, hal•est.
free from disease or infirmity.
[before 1000; Middle English (north); Old English hāl whole]
hale′ness, n.

hale2

(heɪl)

v.t. haled, hal•ing.
1. to compel (someone) to go: to hale a suspect into court.
2. to haul; pull.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Middle French haler < Germanic; compare Old High German halōn to fetch, Old English geholian to get. compare haul]
hal′er, n.

Hale

(heɪl)

n.
1. Edward Everett, 1822–1909, U.S. clergyman and author.
2. George Ellery, 1868–1938, U.S. astronomer.
3. Nathan, 1755–76, American soldier hanged as a spy by the British during the American Revolution.
4. Sarah Josepha, 1788–1879, U.S. editor and author.

hale

- A handle of a plow or wheelbarrow.
See also related terms for plow.

hale


Past participle: haled
Gerund: haling

Imperative
hale
hale
Present
I hale
you hale
he/she/it hales
we hale
you hale
they hale
Preterite
I haled
you haled
he/she/it haled
we haled
you haled
they haled
Present Continuous
I am haling
you are haling
he/she/it is haling
we are haling
you are haling
they are haling
Present Perfect
I have haled
you have haled
he/she/it has haled
we have haled
you have haled
they have haled
Past Continuous
I was haling
you were haling
he/she/it was haling
we were haling
you were haling
they were haling
Past Perfect
I had haled
you had haled
he/she/it had haled
we had haled
you had haled
they had haled
Future
I will hale
you will hale
he/she/it will hale
we will hale
you will hale
they will hale
Future Perfect
I will have haled
you will have haled
he/she/it will have haled
we will have haled
you will have haled
they will have haled
Future Continuous
I will be haling
you will be haling
he/she/it will be haling
we will be haling
you will be haling
they will be haling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been haling
you have been haling
he/she/it has been haling
we have been haling
you have been haling
they have been haling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been haling
you will have been haling
he/she/it will have been haling
we will have been haling
you will have been haling
they will have been haling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been haling
you had been haling
he/she/it had been haling
we had been haling
you had been haling
they had been haling
Conditional
I would hale
you would hale
he/she/it would hale
we would hale
you would hale
they would hale
Past Conditional
I would have haled
you would have haled
he/she/it would have haled
we would have haled
you would have haled
they would have haled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hale - a soldier of the American Revolution who was hanged as a spy by the BritishHale - a soldier of the American Revolution who was hanged as a spy by the British; his last words were supposed to have been `I only regret that I have but one life to give for my country' (1755-1776)
2.Hale - United States astronomer who discovered that sunspots are associated with strong magnetic fields (1868-1938)
3.hale - prolific United States writer (1822-1909)Hale - prolific United States writer (1822-1909)
Verb1.hale - to cause to do through pressure or necessity, by physical, moral or intellectual means :"She forced him to take a job in the city"; "He squeezed her for information"
turn up the heat, turn up the pressure - apply great or increased pressure; "The Democrats turned up the heat on their candidate to concede the election"
drive - to compel or force or urge relentlessly or exert coercive pressure on, or motivate strongly; "She is driven by her passion"
bludgeon - overcome or coerce as if by using a heavy club; "The teacher bludgeoned the students into learning the math formulas"
steamroll, steamroller - bring to a specified state by overwhelming force or pressure; "The Senator steamrollered the bill to defeat"
squeeze for - squeeze someone for money, information, etc.
dragoon, railroad, sandbag - compel by coercion, threats, or crude means; "They sandbagged him to make dinner for everyone"
terrorise, terrorize - coerce by violence or with threats
compel, obligate, oblige - force somebody to do something; "We compel all students to fill out this form"
bring oneself - cause to undertake a certain action, usually used in the negative; "He could not bring himself to call his parents"
2.hale - draw slowly or heavily; "haul stones"; "haul nets"
draw, pull, force - cause to move by pulling; "draw a wagon"; "pull a sled"
bouse, bowse - haul with a tackle
Adj.1.hale - exhibiting or restored to vigorous good health; "hale and hearty"; "whole in mind and body"; "a whole person again"
healthy - having or indicating good health in body or mind; free from infirmity or disease; "a rosy healthy baby"; "staying fit and healthy"

hale

adjective (Old-fashioned) healthy, well, strong, sound, fit, flourishing, blooming, robust, vigorous, hearty, in the pink, in fine fettle, right as rain (Brit. informal), able-bodied looking hale and hearty

hale

adjective
Having good health:
Idioms: fit as a fiddle, hale and hearty, in fine fettle.
Translations

hale

[heɪl] ADJsano, robusto
hale and heartyrobusto, sano y fuerte

hale

[ˈheɪl] adj
hale and hearty → robuste, en pleine santé

hale

adj (+er)kräftig; old manrüstig; hale and heartygesund und munter

hale

[heɪl] adj hale and heartyche scoppia di salute
References in classic literature ?
Tal had not sufficiently recovered from the jaguar wounds to go with the party, but the old man, in spite of his years, was hale and hearty and capable of withstanding hardships.
With his florid cheek, his compact figure smartly arrayed in a bright-buttoned blue coat, his brisk and vigorous step, and his hale and hearty aspect, altogether he seemed -- not young, indeed -- but a kind of new contrivance of Mother Nature in the shape of man, whom age and infirmity had no business to touch.
On the 24th of April he sold his horse--said 'I'm just fifty-seven today, hale and hearty--it would be a PRETTY howdy-do for me to be wasting such a trip as that and such weather as this, on a horse, when there ain't anything in the world so splendid as a tramp on foot through the fresh spring woods and over the cheery mountains, to a man that IS a man--and I can make my dog carry my claim in a little bundle, anyway, when it's collected.
Joseph was an elderly, nay, an old man: very old, perhaps, though hale and sinewy.
His face was so very mild and pleasant, and had something so reverend in it, though it was hale and hearty, that I was not sure but that he was having a good-humoured jest with me.
Solomon Macey, a small hale old man with an abundant crop of long white hair reaching nearly to his shoulders, advanced to the indicated spot, bowing reverently while he fiddled, as much as to say that he respected the company, though he respected the key-note more.
I heard the feet of the slayers as they bounded forward to hale me to the dreadful death, but my tongue clave to the roof of my mouth--I could not say a word.
Hale, stopped him on the street and asked, "Have n't you got a good leather business, Mr.
As for the old Squire, he is still hale and hearty, though rheumatic withal.
The hale and weather-beaten old man who sat beside him had sustained less injury from a far longer course of the same mode of life.
Hale, the wife of the minister of Beverly, was likewise accused.
In the large wicker-bottomed arm-chair in the left-hand chimney- nook sat old Martin Poyser, a hale but shrunken and bleached image of his portly black-haired son--his head hanging forward a little, and his elbows pushed backwards so as to allow the whole of his forearm to rest on the arm of the chair.