hale

(redirected from halest)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

hale 1

 (hāl)
adj. hal·er, hal·est
Free from infirmity or illness; sound. See Synonyms at healthy.

[Middle English, from Old English hāl; see kailo- in Indo-European roots.]

hale′ness n.

hale 2

 (hāl)
tr.v. haled, hal·ing, hales
1. To compel to go: "In short order the human rights campaign was haled before a high court of indignation" (Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.).
2. Archaic To pull, draw, drag, or hoist.

[Middle English halen, to pull, drag, from Old French haler, of Germanic origin; see kelə- in Indo-European roots.]

hale

(heɪl)
adj
1. healthy and robust (esp in the phrase hale and hearty)
2. dialect Scot and Northern English whole
[Old English hæl whole]
ˈhaleness n

hale

(heɪl)
vb
(tr) to pull or drag; haul
[C13: from Old French haler, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German halōn to fetch, Old English geholian to acquire]
ˈhaler n

Hale

(heɪl)
n
1. (Biography) George Ellery. 1868–1938, US astronomer: undertook research into sunspots and invented the spectroheliograph
2. (Biography) Sir Matthew. 1609–76, English judge and scholar; Lord Chief Justice (1671–76)

hale1

(heɪl)

adj. hal•er, hal•est.
free from disease or infirmity.
[before 1000; Middle English (north); Old English hāl whole]
hale′ness, n.

hale2

(heɪl)

v.t. haled, hal•ing.
1. to compel (someone) to go: to hale a suspect into court.
2. to haul; pull.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Middle French haler < Germanic; compare Old High German halōn to fetch, Old English geholian to get. compare haul]
hal′er, n.

Hale

(heɪl)

n.
1. Edward Everett, 1822–1909, U.S. clergyman and author.
2. George Ellery, 1868–1938, U.S. astronomer.
3. Nathan, 1755–76, American soldier hanged as a spy by the British during the American Revolution.
4. Sarah Josepha, 1788–1879, U.S. editor and author.

hale

- A handle of a plow or wheelbarrow.
See also related terms for plow.

hale


Past participle: haled
Gerund: haling

Imperative
hale
hale
Present
I hale
you hale
he/she/it hales
we hale
you hale
they hale
Preterite
I haled
you haled
he/she/it haled
we haled
you haled
they haled
Present Continuous
I am haling
you are haling
he/she/it is haling
we are haling
you are haling
they are haling
Present Perfect
I have haled
you have haled
he/she/it has haled
we have haled
you have haled
they have haled
Past Continuous
I was haling
you were haling
he/she/it was haling
we were haling
you were haling
they were haling
Past Perfect
I had haled
you had haled
he/she/it had haled
we had haled
you had haled
they had haled
Future
I will hale
you will hale
he/she/it will hale
we will hale
you will hale
they will hale
Future Perfect
I will have haled
you will have haled
he/she/it will have haled
we will have haled
you will have haled
they will have haled
Future Continuous
I will be haling
you will be haling
he/she/it will be haling
we will be haling
you will be haling
they will be haling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been haling
you have been haling
he/she/it has been haling
we have been haling
you have been haling
they have been haling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been haling
you will have been haling
he/she/it will have been haling
we will have been haling
you will have been haling
they will have been haling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been haling
you had been haling
he/she/it had been haling
we had been haling
you had been haling
they had been haling
Conditional
I would hale
you would hale
he/she/it would hale
we would hale
you would hale
they would hale
Past Conditional
I would have haled
you would have haled
he/she/it would have haled
we would have haled
you would have haled
they would have haled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hale - a soldier of the American Revolution who was hanged as a spy by the BritishHale - a soldier of the American Revolution who was hanged as a spy by the British; his last words were supposed to have been `I only regret that I have but one life to give for my country' (1755-1776)
2.Hale - United States astronomer who discovered that sunspots are associated with strong magnetic fields (1868-1938)
3.hale - prolific United States writer (1822-1909)Hale - prolific United States writer (1822-1909)
Verb1.hale - to cause to do through pressure or necessity, by physical, moral or intellectual means :"She forced him to take a job in the city"; "He squeezed her for information"
turn up the heat, turn up the pressure - apply great or increased pressure; "The Democrats turned up the heat on their candidate to concede the election"
drive - to compel or force or urge relentlessly or exert coercive pressure on, or motivate strongly; "She is driven by her passion"
bludgeon - overcome or coerce as if by using a heavy club; "The teacher bludgeoned the students into learning the math formulas"
steamroll, steamroller - bring to a specified state by overwhelming force or pressure; "The Senator steamrollered the bill to defeat"
squeeze for - squeeze someone for money, information, etc.
dragoon, railroad, sandbag - compel by coercion, threats, or crude means; "They sandbagged him to make dinner for everyone"
terrorise, terrorize - coerce by violence or with threats
compel, obligate, oblige - force somebody to do something; "We compel all students to fill out this form"
bring oneself - cause to undertake a certain action, usually used in the negative; "He could not bring himself to call his parents"
2.hale - draw slowly or heavily; "haul stones"; "haul nets"
draw, pull, force - cause to move by pulling; "draw a wagon"; "pull a sled"
bouse, bowse - haul with a tackle
Adj.1.hale - exhibiting or restored to vigorous good health; "hale and hearty"; "whole in mind and body"; "a whole person again"
healthy - having or indicating good health in body or mind; free from infirmity or disease; "a rosy healthy baby"; "staying fit and healthy"

hale

adjective (Old-fashioned) healthy, well, strong, sound, fit, flourishing, blooming, robust, vigorous, hearty, in the pink, in fine fettle, right as rain (Brit. informal), able-bodied looking hale and hearty

hale

adjective
Having good health:
Idioms: fit as a fiddle, hale and hearty, in fine fettle.
Translations

hale

[heɪl] ADJsano, robusto
hale and heartyrobusto, sano y fuerte

hale

[ˈheɪl] adj
hale and hearty → robuste, en pleine santé

hale

adj (+er)kräftig; old manrüstig; hale and heartygesund und munter

hale

[heɪl] adj hale and heartyche scoppia di salute
References in periodicals archive ?
The former calmly demurs, enacting a de-monstration worthy of the halest giant.
Rizzo & Braz (2001), trabalhando com cinco cultivares de melao rendilhado (Sunrise, Aragon, Halest Best Jumbo, Nero e Bonus no.
Clyde are still missing Paul Mc HaleSt Johnstone manager Owen Coyle is considering playing against Airdrie United despite suffering from two broken toes.