half-caste


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half-caste

(hăf′kăst′, häf′käst′) Offensive
n.
A person of mixed racial descent.
adj.
Of mixed racial descent.

half-caste

n
(Genetics) a person having parents of different races, esp the offspring of a European and an Indian
adj
(Genetics) of, relating to, or designating such a person

half′-caste`



n.
1. a person whose parents are of different races.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to a half-caste.
[1785–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.half-caste - an offensive term for the offspring of parents of different races or cultures
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
half-breed - an offensive term for an offspring of parents of different races (especially of Caucasian and American Indian ancestry)
mixed-blood - a person whose ancestors belonged to two or more races
Translations

half-caste

[ˈhɑːfkɑːst] (often pej)
A. ADJmestizo
B. Nmestizo/a m/f

half-caste

[ˈhɑːfˌkɑːst] nmeticcio/a

half

(haːf) plural halves (haːvz) noun
1. one of two equal parts of anything. He tried to stick the two halves together again; half a kilo of sugar; a kilo and a half of sugar; one and a half kilos of sugar.
2. one of two equal parts of a game (eg in football, hockey) usually with a break between them. The Rangers scored three goals in the first half.
adjective
1. being (equal to) one of two equal parts (of something). a half bottle of wine.
2. being made up of two things in equal parts. A centaur is a mythical creature, half man and half horse.
3. not full or complete. a half smile.
adverb
1. to the extent of one half. This cup is only half full; It's half empty.
2. almost; partly. I'm half hoping he won't come; half dead from hunger.
half-
a half-dozen; a half-kilo of tea.
halve (haːv) verb
1. to divide (something) into two equal parts. He halved the apple.
2. to make half as great as before; to reduce by half. By going away early in the year, we nearly halved the cost of our holiday.
ˌhalf-and-ˈhalf adverb, adjective
in equal parts. We can split the costs between us half-and-half.
ˈhalf-back noun
in football, hockey etc, (a player in) a position directly behind the forwards.
ˈhalf-brother, ˈhalf-sister nouns
a brother or sister by one parent only. My father has been married twice, and I have two half-brothers.
ˈhalf-caste noun
a person whose father and mother are of different races, especially white and black.
ˌhalf-ˈhearted adjective
not eager; done without enthusiasm. a half-hearted cheer/attempt.
ˌhalf-ˈheartedly adverb
ˌhalf-ˈheartedness noun
ˌhalf-ˈholiday noun
a part of a day (usually the afternoon) during which no work is done. the school-children were given a half-holiday to celebrate the football team's success.
ˌhalf-ˈhourly adjective, adverb
done etc every half-hour. at half-hourly intervals; The buses to town run half-hourly.
ˌhalf-ˈterm noun
(the period when students are given) a holiday about the middle of a term. We get a week's holiday at half-term; (also adjective) a half-term holiday.
ˌhalf-ˈtime noun
a short rest between two halves of a game (of football etc). the players ate oranges at half-time.
ˌhalf-ˈway adjective, adverb
of or at a point equally far from the beginning and the end. We have reached the half-way point; We are half-way through the work now.
ˈhalf-wit noun
a fool or idiot.
ˌhalf-ˈwitted adjective
foolish or idiotic.
ˌhalf-ˈyearly adjective, adverb
done etc every six months. a half-yearly report; We balance our accounts half-yearly.
at half mast
(of flags) flying at a position half-way up a mast etc to show that someone of importance has died. The flags are (flying) at half mast.
by half
by a long way. He's too clever by half.
do things by halves
to do things in an incomplete way. He never does things by halves.
go halves with
to share the cost with.
half past three/four/seven etc ,(American) half after three etc
at thirty minutes past the hour stated. I'm leaving at half past six.
in half
in(to) two equal parts. He cut the cake in half; The pencil broke in half.
not half
a slang expression for very much. `Are you enjoying yourself?' `Not half!'
References in classic literature ?
The other explained that it had come with a fleet of canoes in charge of an English half-caste clerk Kurtz had with him; that Kurtz had apparently intended to return him- self, the station being by that time bare of goods and stores, but after coming three hundred miles, had sud- denly decided to go back, which he started to do alone in a small dug-out with four paddlers, leaving the half- caste to continue down the river with the ivory.
Den he go off courting der girl-she was a half-caste French girl- very pretty.
If he belonged to some savage tribe he had a savage wife --a dozen of them perhaps--and wild, half-caste children.
A half-caste, in a ragged turban and a shabby ulster, grinned a hideous greeting as he thrust a bottle of brandy and two tumblers in front of them.
The half-caste woman who looked after him (she smoked opium, and pretended to keep a second-hand furniture shop by the square where the cheap cabs wait) told the missionaries that she was Kim's mother's sister; but his mother had been nursemaid in a Colonel's family and had married Kimball O'Hara, a young colour- sergeant of the Mavericks, an Irish regiment.
Boyd, Minnie, and Captain Dettmar were the only whites on board, though Lorenzo, the small and greasy engineer, laid a part claim to white, being a Portuguese half-caste.
It was the OROHENA, owned by Toriki, the half-caste trader, who served as his own supercargo and who doubtlessly was even then in the stern sheets of the boat.
Meriem had traversed half the length of the village street when a score of white-robed Negroes and half-castes leaped out upon her from the dark interiors of surrounding huts.
I even pretended years ago to be an African, a half-caste African, but because of my light eyes I did not get away with it, but I dyed my hair black,"  Princess Michael explained.
He said: "I remember years ago people would say I was half-caste and I would hate that word because it makes you sound like you're half of something.
But there was one thing about them: over three years later the Battalion passed through a village they had been billeted in, and I saw several half-caste mites playing in the street.
The young Jedda (Margaret Dingle) learns to speak English, to play the piano and to wear clean white clothes; she plays with Joe (Willie Farrar), an older, half-caste boy on the station, and watches, bemused and fascinated, when the local Aboriginal people head off on their seasonal walkabout.