halo effect


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halo effect

n.
An effect whereby the perception of positive qualities in one thing or part gives rise to the perception of similar qualities in related things or in the whole: "Congenial surroundings or service at a restaurant can sometimes create a halo effect for the food" (M.H. Reed).

halo effect

n
1. (Psychology) See horns and halo effect
2. (Commerce) the beneficial effect on sales of a company's range of products produced by the popularity or high profile of one particular product

ha′lo effect`


n.
a potential inaccuracy in estimation or judgment, esp. of a person, due to a tendency to overgeneralize from a single salient feature or action, usu. in a favorable direction.
[1925–30]
References in periodicals archive ?
Apparently, the white blot is the sun and the black circle surrounding it is just a halo effect, not the moon.
It wasn't just the laptop ban, it was the Muslim country ban [by the US] which had a halo effect on the whole of our part of the world including west Asia; India, Pakistan and everywhere else, because a lot of people felt they weren't welcome there that they were going to have difficulties," said Clark.
For the 25 congregations, the total halo effect came to $73 million, according to the study.
This is known scientifically as exaggerated emotional coherence, and more commonly referred to simply as the halo effect.
The primary driver of this increased effectiveness is the halo effect of the contextual environment in which the ads are seen.
Since overall effectiveness for DCN publishers was 67% higher, and inventory quality was 11% higher (50% divided by 45%), it implies that premium publishers drive 51% higher effectiveness due to the halo effect.
Matt Trigg, Asda's local sourcing manager for Wales, said: "There's been an increase in locally sourced products due to a halo effect from the success of the country and the local pride amongst Welsh people that's come as a result.
Prolonging the halo effect of the dial, the stones are arranged in varied cuts to form a dazzling architecture of diamonds.
Psychologists call this phenomenon "exaggerated emotional coherence" or "the halo effect.
Pierre Bouvard, Chief Insights Officer of Cumulus/Westwood One, says TV's good fortune will have a halo effect on radio too.
Viewers will be treated to a beautiful halo effect as the earth, sun and moon align.
The coverage of his sad passing will have a halo effect on a totally new generation.