haloid


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Related to haloid: haloid acid

haloid

(ˈhælɔɪd) chem
adj
(Elements & Compounds) resembling or derived from a halogen: a haloid salt.
n
(Elements & Compounds) a compound containing halogen atoms in its molecules; halide
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
Limited Tenders are invited for Supply of led metal haloid lamp
The mineral resources subject to the law are the following: coal, ferrous ores, non-ferrous ores, aluminum ores and aluminiferous rocks, noble metals, radioactive metals, rare and disperse soils, haloid salts, useful non-metalliferous substances, useful rocks, precious and semiprecious stones, peat, therapeutic muds and peats, bituminous rocks, non-combustible gases, geothermal waters, gases accompanying them, natural mineral waters (gaseous and flat), therapeutic mineral waters, as well as the mining waste product in waste heaps and tailing management facilities.
Xerox emerged from Haloid Photographic, a company that used its knowledge of Kodak film chemistry to make photographic paper.
The company initially known as Haloid Company had their first logo rendered in 1937.
Haloid Xerox made a brief appearance in the logo in 1958, but was dropped three years later when it was completely replaced by Xerox in 1961.
1920s, processed in 2010 or Haloid Platina, exact expiration date unknown, ca.
Finally, he met Joe Wilson, the president of a photo paper company called Haloid.
In fact, he draws on the storied Xerox, known at its 1906 founding as the Haloid Company, as a prime case.
Finally, in 1960, the Haloid Company, later to be called Xerox, brought photocopies to the public.
Haloid Corporation (now Xerox) flourished by abandoning the standard equipment sales business model and adopting a leasing model (8).