hammerbeam


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ham·mer·beam

 (hăm′ər-bēm′)
n.
A short horizontal beam projecting inward at the top of an interior wall, used in opposite pairs instead of a tie beam as a support for arched roof braces.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other side stands the Great Hall, an impressive doubleheight space with large crown-like chandeliers hanging in the cavernous ceiling from the hammerbeam timber roof structure.
Eidlitz, who was primarily responsible for the interior, departed from the historicizing envelope to create a seemingly modern interior (since rebuilt) characterized by a delicate hammerbeam ceiling and galleries cantilevered on iron brackets.
Buchanan Street is also home to the Argyll Arcade with its ornate iron-framed hammerbeam roof.
Architectural highlights include grotesque stone gargoyles and comely female faces carved into pillars of stone, cathedral-like hammerbeam roofs, and stained-glass windows decorating the reading rooms, chapels, and great halls.
Earlier in the day, Yell's trainer, John Hawkes, provided a major upset when his youngster Hammerbeam beat the long-odds-on favourite Murphy's Blu Boy in the Blue Diamond Prelude.
Five stone statues of unnamed Saxon kings look down from alcoves beneath the 12th Century hammerbeam oak roof.
The original plaster-grained ceiling depicting the Knights of the Garter had to be replaced with a new ceiling of oak hammerbeam, the largest of its kind to be built this century.
The quality of the work, from the hammerbeam roof to the stonework is superb.
The upper room, which has a hammerbeam roof was built in 1641.
Centrepiece of the hotel is the magnificent, three-storey Great Hall with its carved stone walls, hammerbeam roof and grand piano.
St Leonard's, Bridgnorth, which was mostly rebuilt in the 19th century, but still has a hammerbeam roof which dates back to 1662.
This green ticket-hall, the long office half-rounded at its ends, that ironic clerestory, brown glazed tiles, green below, the same, the decorative hammerbeams supporting nothing, above, of course