hammerstone


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ham·mer·stone

 (hăm′ər-stōn′)
n. Archaeology
A stone or cobble used as a pounding or pecking tool.

hammerstone

(ˈhæməˌstəʊn)
n
(Archaeology) a stone used as a hammer in the production of tools during the Acheulian period
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Debitage locus and structure from Taller B: (A) west view of Structure 1, (B) North view of Structure 1, (C) review of possible hammerstone cache from the wall at Structure 1; (D) B-201 debitage locus with its four hammerstones; (E) general view of the site.
A used core usually has characteristic marks on its surface, produced by the blows of a hammerstone or hollows where there were once sections of material.
The event was to help raise funds to support the junior section of the Hammerstone Leach Lane club.
Caption: Freeing the Stone From upper left to lower left, drawings depict the process of using a hammerstone to pound a lump of stone with a prepared surface, called a core, to release a sharp flake that can be used as a tool.
SAVE: PS10 THE FLASK Thermos hammerstone stainless steel flask (1 litre), Asda, direct.
Quaternary man now worked with his hammerstone around a core or nodule, removing small flakes to shape his tool into a circular disk-like form, an amygdaloid shape, or an elongated hache: "One has to remark", added then Reboux,
The use-wear analysis by Nina Kononenko revealed a history of use which suggests that, after its initial manufacture, the tool was re-sharpened (re-ground), rehalted and re-used several times including its use as an anvil and hammerstone.
Progress in the sector is also good news for industrial material suppliers such as Hammerstone Corp.
He and other members of his group were carrying petrol bombs," The Telegraph quoted Hammerstone, as saying.
In the main reduction area we noted >30 broken, partially trimmed, oval blanks ranging in size from basal milling slabs to small hand stones and one silcrete cobble with bruising and battering from use as a hammerstone.
39) Of particular note are a suite of special grips which enable the tool-maker to cradle the target stone and firmly pinch the hammerstone, such that tool-making does not expose the hand to damage.
2006): "Experimental patterns of hammerstone percussion damage on bones: implications for inferences of carcass processing by humans", Journal of Human Evolution, 33, pp.