handkerchief


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hand·ker·chief

 (hăng′kər-chĭf, -chēf′)
n. pl. hand·ker·chiefs also hand·ker·chieves (-chĭvz, -chēvz′)
1. A small square of cloth used especially for wiping the nose or mouth.
2. A large piece of cloth worn as a decorative article; a scarf.

handkerchief

(ˈhæŋkətʃɪf; -tʃiːf)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a small square of soft absorbent material, such as linen, silk, or soft paper, carried and used to wipe the nose, etc

hand•ker•chief

(ˈhæŋ kər tʃɪf, -ˌtʃif)

n.
1. a small piece of fabric, usu. square, used for wiping the nose, eyes, etc., or worn as an accessory.
2. a neckerchief or kerchief.
[1520–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.handkerchief - a square piece of cloth used for wiping the eyes or nose or as a costume accessoryhandkerchief - a square piece of cloth used for wiping the eyes or nose or as a costume accessory
bandana, bandanna - large and brightly colored handkerchief; often used as a neckerchief
piece of cloth, piece of material - a separate part consisting of fabric
pocket-handkerchief - a handkerchief that is carried in a pocket

handkerchief

noun hanky, tissue (informal), mouchoir, snot rag (slang), nose rag (slang) She blew her nose on her already damp handkerchief.
Translations
مِنْدِيلمنديل، محْرَمَه
kapesník
lommetørklæde
nenäliina
maramicarupčić
zsebkendõzsebkendő
vasaklútur
ハンカチ
손수건
nosinė
kabatlakatiņš
vreckovka
robec
näsduk
ผ้าเช็ดหน้า
khăn mùi xoa

handkerchief

[ˈhæŋkətʃɪf] Npañuelo m
see also pocket C

handkerchief

[ˈhæŋkərtʃɪf] nmouchoir mhand-knitted [ˌhændˈnɪtɪd] adjtricoté(e) à la main

handkerchief

nTaschentuch nt

handkerchief

[ˈhæŋkətʃɪf] nfazzoletto

handkerchief

(ˈhӕŋkətʃif) plurals ˈhandkerchiefs ~ˈhandkerchieves (-tʃiːvz) noun
(abbreviation hanky) (plural ˈhankies, ~hankie (ˈhaŋki) ) a small usually square piece of cloth or paper tissue used for wiping or blowing one's nose into.

handkerchief

مِنْدِيل kapesník lommetørklæde Taschentuch μαντήλι pañuelo nenäliina mouchoir rupčić fazzoletto ハンカチ 손수건 zakdoek lommetørkle chusteczka lenço носовой платок näsduk ผ้าเช็ดหน้า mendil khăn mùi xoa 手绢
References in classic literature ?
He was seeking in his mind, then, for the least awkward means of retreat, when he remarked that Aramis had let his handkerchief fall, and by mistake, no doubt, had placed his foot upon it.
The handkerchief was indeed richly embroidered, and had a coronet and arms at one of its corners.
LITTLE Benjamin said that the first thing to be done was to get back Peter's clothes, in order that they might be able to use the pocket handkerchief.
THEN he suggested that they should fill the pocket- handkerchief with onions, as a little present for his Aunt.
A big Chinaman, remarkably evil-looking, with his head swathed in a yellow silk handkerchief and face badly pock-marked, planted a pike-pole on the Reindeer's bow and began to shove the entangled boats apart.
The Yellow Handkerchief hesitated; but I repeated the order fiercely (much more fiercely than I felt), at the same time sending my hand to my hip.
After Anna Mikhaylovna had driven off with her son to visit Count Cyril Vladimirovich Bezukhov, Countess Rostova sat for a long time all alone applying her handkerchief to her eyes.
Accident had made me acquainted with the virtues of this estimable woman, and I felt assured that she would treat even a pocket- handkerchief kindly.
The merry old gentleman, placing a snuff-box in one pocket of his trousers, a note-case in the other, and a watch in his waistcoat pocket, with a guard-chain round his neck, and sticking a mock diamond pin in his shirt: buttoned his coat tight round him, and putting his spectacle-case and handkerchief in his pockets, trotted up and down the room with a stick, in imitation of the manner in which old gentlmen walk about the streets any hour in the day.
The coroner moved round to the end of the table and undid a silk handkerchief which had been passed under the chin and knotted on the top of the head.
The first ten or fifteen times I wanted my handkerchief I didn't seem to care; I got along, and said never mind, it isn't any matter, and dropped it out of my mind.
They were all generous, these travelling men; they gave Tiny Soderball handkerchiefs and gloves and ribbons and striped stockings, and so many bottles of perfume and cakes of scented soap that she bestowed some of them on Lena.