handout


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hand·out

 (hănd′out′)
n.
1. A gift, as of food, clothing, or money, given to the needy.
2. A folder or leaflet circulated free of charge.
3. A sheet or sheets of paper containing topical information, distributed to people attending a speech, lecture, or meeting.
4. A prepared news or publicity release.

hand•out

(ˈhændˌaʊt)

n.
1. a portion of food or the like given to a needy person, as a beggar.
2. a press release.
3. any copy of a speech, fact sheet, etc., distributed at a meeting.
4. anything given away for nothing, as a free sample of a product.
[1825–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.handout - an announcement distributed to members of the press in order to supplement or replace an oral presentationhandout - an announcement distributed to members of the press in order to supplement or replace an oral presentation
promulgation, announcement - a public statement containing information about an event that has happened or is going to happen; "the announcement appeared in the local newspaper"; "the promulgation was written in English"
2.handout - giving money or food or clothing to a needy person
charity - an activity or gift that benefits the public at large

handout

noun
1. (often plural) charity, dole, alms They depended on handouts from the state.
2. press release, bulletin, circular, mailshot Official handouts described the couple as elated.
3. leaflet, literature (informal), bulletin, flyer, pamphlet, printed matter lectures, handouts, slides and videos
4. giveaway, freebie (informal), free gift, free sample advertised with publicity handouts

handout

noun
1. Something given to a charity or cause:
2. Assistance, especially money, food, and other necessities, given to the needy or dispossessed:
Translations
تَبَرُّعات للفُقَراءورقَة مَعلومات ، وَرقَة عَمَل للطُلاّب
dar chudýmdávkapodklad pro schůzi atdsylabus
almissedonationfotokopi
kiosztott elõadásvázlat/anyag
plán prednáškyvecné dary pre chudobných
ders notusadakateksir

handout

[ˈhændaʊt] N
1. (= leaflet) → octavilla f, panfleto m; (= pamphlet) → folleto m; (= press handout) → nota f de prensa; (at lecture) → hoja f
2. (= money) → limosna f
3. (= distribution) → distribución f, repartimiento m

handout

hand-out [ˈhændaʊt] n
(= document) → prospectus m; (at lecture, meeting)polycopié m (= press handout) → communiqué m de presse
(= subsidy) (from government, charity)subvention f
cash handout → subvention f
to live off handouts from sb (from the state)vivre de la charité de qn; (from individual)
He lives off handouts from his parents → Il vit du soutien financier de ses parents.
see also hand out

handout

[ˈhændˌaʊt] n (leaflet) → volantino; (press handout) → comunicato stampa; (at lecture) → fotocopia (fam) (money) → elemosina

hand

(hӕnd) noun
1. the part of the body at the end of the arm.
2. a pointer on a clock, watch etc. Clocks usually have an hour hand and a minute hand.
3. a person employed as a helper, crew member etc. a farm hand; All hands on deck!
4. help; assistance. Can I lend a hand?; Give me a hand with this box, please.
5. a set of playing-cards dealt to a person. I had a very good hand so I thought I had a chance of winning.
6. a measure (approximately centimetres) used for measuring the height of horses. a horse of 14 hands.
7. handwriting. written in a neat hand.
verb
(often with back, ~down, ~up etc).
1. to give (something) to someone by hand. I handed him the book; He handed it back to me; I'll go up the ladder, and you can hand the tools up to me.
2. to pass, transfer etc into another's care etc. That is the end of my report from Paris. I'll now hand you back to Fred Smith in the television studio in London.
ˈhandful noun
1. as much as can be held in one hand. a handful of sweets.
2. a small number. Only a handful of people came to the meeting.
3. a person etc difficult to control. Her three children are a (bit of a) handful.
ˈhandbag noun
(American usually purse) a small bag carried by women, for personal belongings.
ˈhandbill noun
a small printed notice.
ˈhandbook noun
a small book giving information about (how to do) something. a handbook of European birds; a bicycle-repair handbook.
ˈhandbrake noun
(in a car, bus etc) a brake operated by the driver's hand.
ˈhandcuff verb
to put handcuffs on (a person). The police handcuffed the criminal.
ˈhandcuffs noun plural
steel rings, joined by a short chain, put round the wrists of prisoners. a pair of handcuffs.
ˈhand-lens noun
a magnifying-glass held in the hand.
ˌhandˈmade adjective
made with a person's hands or with tools held in the hands, rather than by machines. hand-made furniture.
hand-ˈoperated adjective
hand-operated switches.
ˈhand-outhand outbelowˌhand-ˈpicked adjective
chosen very carefully. a hand-picked team of workers.
ˈhandshake noun
the act of grasping (a person's) hand eg as a greeting.
ˈhandstand noun
the gymnastic act of balancing one's body upright in the air with one's hands on the ground.
ˈhandwriting noun
1. writing with a pen or pencil. Today we will practise handwriting.
2. the way in which a person writes. Your handwriting is terrible!
ˈhandwritten adjective
The letter was handwritten, not typed.
at hand
1. (with close or near) near. The bus station is close at hand.
2. available. Help is at hand.
at the hands of
from, or by the action of. He received very rough treatment at the hands of the terrorists.
be hand in glove (with someone)
to be very closely associated with someone, especially for a bad purpose.
by hand
1. with a person's hand or tools held in the hands, rather than with machinery. furniture made by hand.
2. not by post but by a messenger etc. This parcel was delivered by hand.
fall into the hands (of someone)
to be caught, found, captured etc by someone. He fell into the hands of bandits; The documents fell into the wrong hands (= were found, captured etc by someone who was not supposed to see them).
force someone's hand
to force someone to do something either which he does not want to do or sooner than he wants to do it.
get one's hands on
1. to catch. If I ever get my hands on him, I'll make him sorry for what he did!
2. to get or obtain. I'd love to get my hands on a car like that.
give/lend a helping hand
to help or assist. I'm always ready to give/lend a helping hand.
hand down
to pass on from one generation to the next. These customs have been handed down from father to son since the Middle Ages.
hand in
to give or bring to a person, place etc. The teacher told the children to hand in their exercise-books.
hand in hand
with one person holding the hand of another. The boy and girl were walking along hand in hand; Poverty and crime go hand in hand.
hand on
to give to someone. When you have finished reading these notes, hand them on to me.
hand out
to give to several people; to distribute. The teacher handed out books to all the pupils; They were handing out leaflets in the street.
hand-out noun
a leaflet.
handout noun
1. a leaflet or a copy of a piece of paper with information given to students in class, distributed at a meeting etc. You'll find the diagram on page four of your handout.
2. money, clothes etc given to a very poor person or a beggar.
hand over
to give or pass; to surrender. We know you have the jewels, so hand them over; They handed the thief over to the police.
hand over fist
in large amounts, usually quickly. He's making money hand over fist.
hands down
very easily. You'll win hands down.
hands off!
do not touch!.
hands-on adjective
practical; involving active participation. hands-on experience with computers.
hands up!
raise your hands above your head. `Hands up!' shouted the gunman.
hand to hand with one individual fighting another at close quarters: The soldiers fought the enemy hand to hand; () adjective (etc)
hand-to-hand fighting.
have a hand in (something)
to be one of the people who have caused, done etc (something). Did you have a hand in the building of this boat / in the success of the project?
have/get/gain the upper hand
to (begin to) win, beat the enemy etc. The enemy made a fierce attack but failed to get the upper hand.
hold hands (with someone)
to be hand in hand with someone. The boy and girl walked along holding hands (with each other).
in good hands
receiving care and attention. The patient is in good hands.
in hand
1. not used etc; remaining. We still have $10 in hand.
2. being dealt with. We have received your complaint and the matter is now in hand.
in the hands of
being dealt with by. This matter is now in the hands of my solicitor.
keep one's hand in
to remain good or skilful at doing something by doing it occasionally. I still sometimes play a game of billiards, just to keep my hand in.
off one's hands
no longer needing to be looked after etc. You'll be glad to get the children off your hands for a couple of weeks.
on hand
near; present; ready for use etc. We always keep some candles on hand in case there's a power failure.
(on the one hand) … on the other hand
an expression used to introduce two opposing parts of an argument etc. (On the one hand) we could stay and help you, but on the other hand, it might be better if we went to help him instead.
out of hand
unable to be controlled. The angry crowd was getting out of hand.
shake hands with (someone) / shake someone's hand
to grasp a person's (usually right) hand, in one's own (usually right) hand, as a form of greeting, as a sign of agreement etc.
a show of hands
at a meeting, debate etc, a vote expressed by people raising their hands.
take in hand
to look after, discipline or train.
to hand
here; easily reached. All the tools you need are to hand.

handout

n folleto (p. ej., con consejos médicos)
References in periodicals archive ?
Ameers for PP-199 and PP-203 would be appointed after some days, however, newly elected Ameers would assume charge after oath-taking ceremony on November 2, the handout added.
The plantar fasciitis handout follows a 2014 effort to release a list of five tests/procedures that are commonly ordered for foot and ankle conditions but not always necessary.
But the fact we are lining the pockets of people who don't even live here anymore, but are still entitled to the handout merely because their children were born here, is ludicrous.
The handout is supposed 'to help pay your heating bills' and designed as a flat sum for all pensioners to put towards the costs of keeping warm during the icy winter months.
The handout instructs the wives of male teachers to list their occupation on visa applications as housewife and states that they should not mention that they would be working.
Once in a week a handout released from IG Khyber Pakhtunkhwa when he took the charge as IG KP, which inscribed that several policemen were suspended over corruption or involvement in other criminal activities, however, not a single policemen were identified which seems like the suspension of policemen were limited to paper works nothing else.
If the Chancellor has found PS1bn down the back of the sofa, I can think of better ways to use it than to award married couples who are both working with good salaries a handout of PS60 per week He could have done away with bedroom tax, reduced the cap on the social care bill for the elderly, or paid families who have given up work to care for children so disabled they can't even use childcare.
It's a great thing that they are doing for us and we are indeed grateful for the wonderful iftr today for which, I am glad, we don't have to pay," Mohammed Ismail, 28, an Indian labourer told XPRESS at the Al Quoz camp, a venue of a handout this week.
Scrap the $2 billion annual handout, and help return the budget to surplus in a way that doesn't harm ordinary Australians.
Patient age and gender were available for all patients eligible to receive either a handout or a mail questionnaire; other patient characteristics used in analyses were self-reported.
The handout says that the Iran pipe is "an important factor contributing to development of Turkmen-Iranian relations and enhancing regional trade and economic ties, expanding opportunities for bilateral and multilateral partnership.
Many joined the demonstration after first collecting their handout cheques.