hangman


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hang·man

 (hăng′mən)
n.
1. A man employed to execute condemned prisoners by hanging.
2. (also -măn) A game in which one player chooses a word whose letters are guessed at by another player. For each wrong guess, a new part of the stick figure of a hanging man is drawn until either the word is guessed correctly or the drawing is completed.

hangman

(ˈhæŋmən)
n, pl -men
(Law) an official who carries out a sentence of hanging on condemned criminals

hang•man

(ˈhæŋ mən)

n., pl. -men.
a person who hangs criminals who are condemned to death; public executioner.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hangman - an executioner who hangs the condemned personhangman - an executioner who hangs the condemned person
executioner, public executioner - an official who inflicts capital punishment in pursuit of a warrant
Translations
جَلاد، مُنَفِّذ حُكْم الإعْدام
kat
bøddel
böîull
rabelj

hangman

[ˈhæŋmən] N (hangmen (pl)) → verdugo m

hangman

[ˈhæŋmən] n
(= executioner) → bourreau m
(= game) → pendu m

hangman

[ˈhæŋmən] n (-men (pl)) → boia m inv

hang

(hӕŋ) past tense, past participle hung (haŋ) verb
1. to put or fix, or to be put or fixed, above the ground eg by a hook. We'll hang the picture on that wall; The picture is hanging on the wall.
2. to fasten (something), or to be fastened, at the top or side so that it can move freely but cannot fall. A door hangs by its hinges.
3. (past tense, past participle hanged) to kill, or to be killed, by having a rope put round the neck and being allowed to drop. Murderers used to be hanged in the United Kingdom, but no-one hangs for murder now.
4. (often with down or out) to be bending, drooping or falling downwards. The dog's tongue was hanging out; Her hair was hanging down.
5. to bow (one's head). He hung his head in shame.
ˈhanger noun
(usually ˈcoat-hanger) a shaped metal, wooden or plastic frame with a hook on which jackets, dresses etc are hung up.
ˈhanging noun
the (act of) killing a criminal by hanging.
ˈhangings noun plural
curtains or material hung on walls for decoration.
ˈhangman noun
a man whose job it is to hang criminals.
ˈhangover noun
the unpleasant after effects of having had too much alcohol. He woke up with a hangover.
get the hang of
to learn or begin to understand how to do (something). It may seem difficult at first, but you'll get the hang of it after a few weeks.
hang about/around
1. to stand around, doing nothing. I don't like to see all these youths hanging about (street-corners).
2. to be close to (a person) frequently. I don't want you hanging around my daughter.
hang back
to hesitate or be unwilling. The soldiers all hung back when the sergeant asked for volunteers.
hang in the balance
to be in doubt. The success of this project is hanging in the balance.
hang on
1. to wait. Will you hang on a minute – I'm not quite ready.
2. (often with to) to hold. Hang on to that rope.
3. to keep; to retain. He likes to hang on to his money.
hang together
to agree or be consistent. His statements just do not hang together.
hang up
1. to hang (something) on something. Hang up your coat in the cupboard.
2. (often with on) to put the receiver back after a telephone conversation. I tried to talk to her, but she hung up (on me).

She hung the picture up.
The murderer was hanged.
References in classic literature ?
The executioner knotted the cord firmly round the unfortunate man's neck and was just about to swing him into the air, when the Sultan's purveyor dashed through the crowd, and cried, panting, to the hangman,
The hangman did as he was bid, and was tying the cord firmly, when he was stopped by the voice of the Jewish doctor beseeching him to pause, for he had something very important to say.
Loosen the Jewish doctor," said he to the hangman, "and string up the tailor instead, since he has made confession of his crime.
The usher hastened on his errand, but was only just in time, for the tailor was positively swinging in the air, when his voice fell upon the silence of the crowd, commanding the hangman to cut down the body.
And in times to come,' pursued the hangman, 'if our grandsons should think of their grandfathers' times, and find these things altered, they'll say, "Those were days indeed, and we've been going down hill ever since.
Gashford had leant back in his chair, regarding him with eyes so sunken, and so shadowed by his heavy brows, that for aught the hangman saw of them, he might have been stone blind.
I'd lead them, Muster Gashford,'--the hangman was beginning in a reckless way, when Gashford started forward, laid his finger on his lips, and feigned to write, just as the door was opened by John Grueby.
I was ne'er a hangman in all my life, nor do I now intend to begin that trade.
The meeting marked the point at which Albert Pierrepoint's two worlds - jovial Oldham publican by night, clinical state hangman in his spare time - collided.
Capital punishment is on the statute book in Zimbabwe, but no one has been executed since 2005, when the country's last hangman retired.
Sick Ian Brady played games of hangman with Myra Hindley in court, it has emerged.
SICK Ian Brady played the kids' game hangman with Myra Hindley in court, it has emerged.