haplessness


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hap·less

 (hăp′lĭs)
adj.
Luckless; unfortunate. See Synonyms at unfortunate.

hap′less·ly adv.
hap′less·ness n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
David James' haplessness is an obvious predicament for the England coach, but what alternatives are there?
And Dundalk took great pleasure in their opponents' haplessness by adding another before the break.
Such haplessness had been the result of officials creating a green that possessed all the friction and hold of a marble staircase.
With typical haplessness, O'Muilleoir has proven the point of my original column: I believe the Andytown News is guilty of working to silence not only those who question its cosy relationship with Sinn Fein or its Stakeknife coverage, but any media organisation that might give breath to free and open debate on these matters.
The wit and wisdom of George W Bush:As world leaders go, even the First Minister may have some way to go before catching up with the verbal haplessness of the current US president.
And got trodden into the ground over 90 minutes of barely believable haplessness.
Genuine malice within the group is not nearly as common as the haplessness which humans invariably demonstrate in the face of the complexity and nuance of human relationships.
and by complaining that today's public doesn't know why we really are in Afghanistan with the haplessness of our troops out there.
It's a reference to the haplessness of self-presentation--to the way that a woman's Cleopatra eyeliner makes her look not like Elizabeth Taylor but like someone who is failing to look like Elizabeth Taylor--and is frequently quoted as such.
Leicester, for all their first-half haplessness, do not lack fight and drive.
Pressed on the obvious gulf in class and power and the haplessness of the Wales display, his guard was still firmly up.
And then David James fulfilling all predictions of his own haplessness by pulling Thierry Henry down in the box.