harassed


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

ha·rass

 (hə-răs′, hăr′əs)
tr.v. ha·rassed, ha·rass·ing, ha·rass·es
1. To subject (another) to hostile or prejudicial remarks or actions; pressure or intimidate.
2. To irritate or torment persistently: His mind was harassed by doubts and misgivings.
3. To make repeated attacks or raids on (an enemy, for example).

[French harasser, from Old French (a la) harache, (a la) harace (as in courre a la harache, to chase) : hare, call used to set dogs on (of Germanic origin; see ko- in Indo-European roots) + -ache, -ace, deprecative n. suff.]

ha·rass′er n.
ha·rass′ment n.
Synonyms: harass, harry, hound, badger, pester, plague
These verbs mean to trouble persistently or incessantly. Harass and harry imply systematic persecution by besieging with repeated annoyances, threats, or demands: The landlord harassed the tenants who were behind in their rent. "John Adams and John Quincy Adams, pillars of personal rectitude, were harried throughout their presidencies by accusations of corruption, fraud, and abuses of power" (Alan Brinkley and Davis Dyer).
Hound suggests unrelenting pursuit to gain a desired end: Reporters hounded the celebrity for an interview. To badger is to nag or entreat persistently: The child badgered his parents for a new bicycle. To pester is to inflict a succession of petty annoyances: "How she would have pursued and pestered me with questions and surmises" (Charlotte Brontë).
Plague refers to a problem likened to a noxious disease: "As I have no estate, I am plagued with no tenants or stewards" (Henry Fielding).
Usage Note: The pronunciation of harass with stress on the first syllable (rhyming roughly with Paris) is the older, traditional pronunciation. The pronunciation with stress on the second syllable (rhyming roughly with surpass) is a newer pronunciation that first occurred in American English. Its use has steadily increased since the mid-1900s. In our 1987 survey, 50 percent of the Usage Panel preferred the pronunciation with stress on the first syllable, and 50 percent preferred stress on the second syllable. Fourteen years later, in our 2001 survey, preference for stress on the first syllable dropped to 30 percent while preference for stress on the second syllable rose to 70 percent. The results from our 2013 survey suggest that this trend away from the traditional pronunciation has continued: only 10 percent preferred the stress on the first syllable, whereas 90 percent preferred the pronunciation with the stress on the second syllable. In fact, in 2013, 35 percent of the Panel considered the pronunciation with the stress on the first syllable to be unacceptable. The original pronunciation has almost completely given way in only a few decades, at least in the United States.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.harassed - troubled persistently especially with petty annoyancesharassed - troubled persistently especially with petty annoyances; "harassed working mothers"; "a harried expression"; "her poor pestered father had to endure her constant interruptions"; "the vexed parents of an unruly teenager"
troubled - characterized by or indicative of distress or affliction or danger or need; "troubled areas"; "fell into a troubled sleep"; "a troubled expression"; "troubled teenagers"

harassed

adjective hassled, worried, troubled, strained, harried, under pressure, plagued, tormented, distraught (informal), vexed, under stress, careworn Looking harassed and drawn, he tendered his resignation.
Translations
مُتَضايِق
ztrápený
mishandlet
hrjáîur; áreittur; kvalinn
utrápený
bezmiştedirgin

harassed

[ˈhærəst] ADJ (= exhausted) → agobiado; (= under pressure) → presionado
to look harassedparecer agobiado

harassed

[ˈhærəst həˈræst] adj (= worried, stressed) → tracassé(e), stressé(e)

harassed

adjabgespannt, angegriffen, mitgenommen; (= worried)von Sorgen gequält; a harassed fatherein (viel) geplagter Vater; she was very harassed that dayan dem Tag wusste sie nicht, wo ihr der Kopf stand; he wiped his brow in a harassed mannerer wischte sich (dat)gequält die Stirn

harassed

[ˈhærəst] adj (under attack) → tormentato/a; (troubled) → assillato/a; (under pressure) → stressato/a
you look harassed → hai una faccia sconvolta

harass

(ˈhӕrəs) , ((especially American) həˈras) verb
1. to annoy or trouble (a person) constantly or frequently. The children have been harassing me all morning.
2. to make frequent sudden attacks on (an enemy). The army was constantly harassed by groups of terrorists.
ˈharassed adjective
a harassed mother.
ˈharassment noun
He complained of harassment by the police.
sexual harassmentsex
References in classic literature ?
Since Tom's harassed conscience had managed to drive him to the lawyer's house by night and wring a dread tale from lips that had been sealed with the dismalest and most formidable of oaths, Huck's confidence in the human race was well-nigh obliterated.
To-day the best that a harassed Black Hawk merchant can hope for is to sell provisions and farm machinery and automobiles to the rich farms where that first crop of stalwart Bohemian and Scandinavian girls are now the mistresses.
If his sisters or their friends happened to be among the onlookers on `popular nights,' Sylvester stood back in the shadow under the cottonwood trees, smoking and watching Lena with a harassed expression.
They had been harassed and perplexed in rugged mountain defiles, where their progress was continually impeded by rocks and precipices.
And at Rhodes the demagogues, by distributing of bribes, prevented the people from paying the trierarchs what was owing to them, who were obliged by the number of actions they were harassed with to conspire together and destroy the popular state.
His round blue eyes looked harassed behind his glasses.
At this Zeus was annoyed, but fulfilled his prayer because of his own promise; but to prevent him from enjoying any of the pleasures provided, and to keep him continually harassed, he hung a stone over his head which prevents him from ever reaching any of the pleasant things near by.
There were some long, heavy hills, but James drove so carefully and thoughtfully that we were not at all harassed.
Here the viceroy and his company were received with so much ceremony, as was rather troublesome than pleasing to us who were fatigued with the labours of the passage; and having stayed here some time, that the gentlemen who attended the viceroy to Goa might fit out their vessels, we set sail, and after having been detained some time at sea, by calms and contrary winds, and somewhat harassed by the English and Dutch, who were now increased to eleven ships of war, arrived at Goa, on Saturday, the 16th of December, and the viceroy made his entry with great magnificence.
The next morning he felt so harassed with the nightmare of consequences-- he dreaded so much the immediate issues before him--that seeing while he breakfasted the arrival of the Riverston coach, he went out hurriedly and took his place on it, that he might be relieved, at least for a day, from the necessity of doing or saying anything in Middlemarch.
Deputations from all corners of the Union harassed him without cessation or intermission.
He was free from that shame, which had usually harassed him after a fall; and he could look everyone straight in the face.