harbour


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har·bour

 (här′bər)
n. & v. Chiefly British
Variant of harbor.

harbour

(ˈhɑːbə) or

harbor

n
1. (Nautical Terms) a sheltered port
2. a place of refuge or safety
vb
3. (tr) to give shelter to: to harbour a criminal.
4. (tr) to maintain secretly: to harbour a grudge.
5. (Nautical Terms) to shelter (a vessel) in a harbour or (of a vessel) to seek shelter
[Old English herebeorg, from here troop, army + beorg shelter; related to Old High German heriberga hostelry, Old Norse herbergi]
ˈharbourer, ˈharborer n
ˈharbourless, ˈharborless adj

har•bor

(ˈhɑr bər)

n.
1. a part of a body of water along the shore deep enough for anchoring a ship and so situated with respect to coastal features, as to provide protection from winds, waves, and currents.
2. such a body of water having docks or port facilities.
3. any place of shelter or refuge.
v.t.
4. to give shelter to: to harbor refugees.
5. to conceal; hide: to harbor fugitives.
6. to keep or hold in the mind; maintain; entertain: to harbor suspicion.
7. to house or contain.
8. to shelter (a vessel), as in a harbor.
v.i.
9. (of a vessel) to take shelter in a harbor.
Also, esp. Brit.,harbour.
[before 1150; Middle English herber(we),herberge, Old English herebeorg lodgings, quarters =here army + (ge)beorg refuge; c. Old Saxon, Old High German heriberga]
har′bor•er, n.
har′bor•less, adj.
har′bor•ous, adj.
syn: harbor, port, haven refer to a shelter for ships. A harbor is a natural or an artificially constructed shelter and anchorage for ships: a fine harbor on the eastern coast. A port is a harbor viewed esp. with reference to its commercial activities and facilities: a thriving port. haven is a literary word meaning refuge, although occasionally referring to a natural harbor that can be utilized by ships as a place of safety: to seek a haven in a storm. See also cherish.

harbour


Past participle: harboured
Gerund: harbouring

Imperative
harbour
harbour
Present
I harbour
you harbour
he/she/it harbours
we harbour
you harbour
they harbour
Preterite
I harboured
you harboured
he/she/it harboured
we harboured
you harboured
they harboured
Present Continuous
I am harbouring
you are harbouring
he/she/it is harbouring
we are harbouring
you are harbouring
they are harbouring
Present Perfect
I have harboured
you have harboured
he/she/it has harboured
we have harboured
you have harboured
they have harboured
Past Continuous
I was harbouring
you were harbouring
he/she/it was harbouring
we were harbouring
you were harbouring
they were harbouring
Past Perfect
I had harboured
you had harboured
he/she/it had harboured
we had harboured
you had harboured
they had harboured
Future
I will harbour
you will harbour
he/she/it will harbour
we will harbour
you will harbour
they will harbour
Future Perfect
I will have harboured
you will have harboured
he/she/it will have harboured
we will have harboured
you will have harboured
they will have harboured
Future Continuous
I will be harbouring
you will be harbouring
he/she/it will be harbouring
we will be harbouring
you will be harbouring
they will be harbouring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been harbouring
you have been harbouring
he/she/it has been harbouring
we have been harbouring
you have been harbouring
they have been harbouring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been harbouring
you will have been harbouring
he/she/it will have been harbouring
we will have been harbouring
you will have been harbouring
they will have been harbouring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been harbouring
you had been harbouring
he/she/it had been harbouring
we had been harbouring
you had been harbouring
they had been harbouring
Conditional
I would harbour
you would harbour
he/she/it would harbour
we would harbour
you would harbour
they would harbour
Past Conditional
I would have harboured
you would have harboured
he/she/it would have harboured
we would have harboured
you would have harboured
they would have harboured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.harbour - a sheltered port where ships can take on or discharge cargoharbour - a sheltered port where ships can take on or discharge cargo
docking facility, dockage, dock - landing in a harbor next to a pier where ships are loaded and unloaded or repaired; may have gates to let water in or out; "the ship arrived at the dock more than a day late"
landing place, landing - structure providing a place where boats can land people or goods
seafront - the waterfront of a seaside town
port - a place (seaport or airport) where people and merchandise can enter or leave a country
coaling station - a seaport where ships can take on supplies of coal
port of call - any port where a ship stops except its home port
anchorage ground, anchorage - place for vessels to anchor
2.harbour - a place of refuge and comfort and security
asylum, sanctuary, refuge - a shelter from danger or hardship
Verb1.harbour - secretly shelter (as of fugitives or criminals)
shelter - provide shelter for; "After the earthquake, the government could not provide shelter for the thousands of homeless people"
2.harbour - keep in one's possession; of animals
keep, hold on - retain possession of; "Can I keep my old stuffed animals?"; "She kept her maiden name after she married"
3.harbour - hold back a thought or feeling about; "She is harboring a grudge against him"
conceal, hide - prevent from being seen or discovered; "Muslim women hide their faces"; "hide the money"
4.harbour - maintain (a theory, thoughts, or feelings); "bear a grudge"; "entertain interesting notions"; "harbor a resentment"
feel, experience - undergo an emotional sensation or be in a particular state of mind; "She felt resentful"; "He felt regret"

harbour

noun
1. port, haven, dock, mooring, marina, pier, wharf, anchorage, jetty, pontoon, slipway The ship was allowed to tie up in the harbour.
2. sanctuary, haven, shelter, retreat, asylum, refuge, oasis, covert, safe haven, sanctum a safe harbour for music rejected by the mainstream
verb
1. hold, bear, maintain, nurse, retain, foster, entertain, nurture, cling to, cherish, brood over He might have been murdered by someone harbouring a grudge.
2. shelter, protect, hide, relieve, lodge, shield, conceal, secrete, provide refuge, give asylum to harbouring terrorist suspects
Translations
ميناءمِينَاءيأوييَضْمِرُ، يَحْمِلُ فِكْرَةً او شُعورا
пристанище
přístavživitpřechovávat
havnhusenæreskjule
haveno
satama
luka
kikötőmenedéket adtáplál
höfnhÿsa; skÿlaala í brjósti sér
항구
portus
priglobtisuteikti prieglobstįuostasuosto viršininkas
dot patvērumuostaperināt
hamn
ท่าเรือ
bến cảng

harbour

harbor (US) [ˈhɑːbəʳ]
A. Npuerto m
B. VT (= retain) [+ fear, hope] → abrigar; (= shelter) [+ criminal, spy] → dar abrigo or refugio a; (= conceal) → esconder
that corner harbours the dusten ese rincón se amontona el polvo
to harbour a grudgeguardar rencor
C. CPD harbour dues NPLderechos mpl portuarios
harbour master Ncapitán m de puerto

harbour

[ˈhɑːrr] (British) harbor (US)
n (for boats)port m safe harbour
vt
(= provide refuge for) [+ criminal, terrorist] → abriter
(= entertain) [+ hopes, suspicions, doubts] → entretenir; [+ ambitions] → nourrir; [+ regrets] → nourrir
to harbour a grudge against sb → en vouloir à qnharbour dues (British) harbor dues (US) npldroits mpl de portharbour master (British) harbor master (US) ncapitaine m de port

harbour

, (US) harbor
nHafen m
vt
criminal etcbeherbergen, Unterschlupf gewähren (+dat); goods(bei sich) aufbewahren
suspicions, grudge, doubts, resentmenthegen; ambitions, feelingshaben; regretsempfinden; to harbour thoughts of revengeRachegedanken hegen
(= conceal, contain) dirt harbours germsSchmutz ist eine Brutstätte für Krankheitserreger; some sufferers continue to harbour the virusin manchen Kranken lebt der Virus weiter

harbour

, (US) harbor:
harbour bar
nSandbank fvor dem Hafen
harbour dues
plHafengebühr(en) f(pl)
harbour master
nHafenmeister(in) m(f)

harbour

harbor (Am) [ˈhɑːbəʳ]
1. nporto
2. vt (hold, grudge, resentment) → covare, nutrire; (shelter, criminal, spy) → dar rifugio a, tener nascosto/a

harbour

(American) harbor (ˈhaːbə) noun
a place of shelter for ships. All the ships stayed in (the) harbour during the storm.
verb
1. to give shelter or refuge to (a person). It is against the law to harbour criminals.
2. to have (usually bad) thoughts in one's head. He harbours a grudge against me.
ˈharbour-master noun
the official in charge of a harbour.

harbour

مِينَاء přístav havn Hafen λιμάνι puerto satama port luka porto 항구 haven havn port porto гавань hamn ท่าเรือ liman bến cảng 海港
References in classic literature ?
In my native town of Salem, at the head of what, half a century ago, in the days of old King Derby, was a bustling wharf -- but which is now burdened with decayed wooden warehouses, and exhibits few or no symptoms of commercial life; except, perhaps, a bark or brig, half-way down its melancholy length, discharging hides; or, nearer at hand, a Nova Scotia schooner, pitching out her cargo of firewood -- at the head, I say, of this dilapidated wharf, which the tide often overflows, and along which, at the base and in the rear of the row of buildings, the track of many languid years is seen in a border of unthrifty grass -- here, with a view from its front windows adown this not very enlivening prospect, and thence across the harbour, stands a spacious edifice of brick.
And so they came into a deep forest, and by fortune they were nighted, and rode along in a deep way, and at the last they came into a courtelage where abode the duke of South Marches, and there they asked harbour.
The fever was over, and Emma could harbour little fear of the pulse being quickened again by injurious courtesy.
I wish him very happy; and I am so sure of his always doing his duty, that though now he may harbour some regret, in the end he must become so.
I had not known how to do it well, not understanding how the wind would set when we were out of the harbour.
One said she lived in the South Foreland Light, and had singed her whiskers by doing so; another, that she was made fast to the great buoy outside the harbour, and could only be visited at half-tide; a third, that she was locked up in Maidstone jail for child-stealing; a fourth, that she was seen to mount a broom in the last high wind, and make direct for Calais.
By the aid of cunning architects he had first blasted his harbour into shape, then built his hotels and pleasure-palaces, and then leased them to dependants of his who knew the right sort of people, and who knew that it was as much as their lease was worth to find accommodation for teetotal amateur photographers or wistful wandering Sunday-school treats.
Thither let us tend From off the tossing of these fiery waves, There rest, if any rest can harbour there, And reassembling our afflicted Powers, Consult how we may henceforth most offend Our Enemy, our own loss how repair, How overcome this dire Calamity, What reinforcement we may gain from Hope, If not what resolution from despare.
said the Jew; ``in Sheffield I can harbour with my kinsman Zareth, and find some means of travelling forth with safety.
I communicated to his majesty a project I had formed of seizing the enemy's whole fleet; which, as our scouts assured us, lay at anchor in the harbour, ready to sail with the first fair wind.
We had touched at many ports and made much profit, when one day upon the open sea we were caught by a terrible wind which blew us completely out of our reckoning, and lasting for several days finally drove us into harbour on a strange island.
Then he went and wakened the sailors, and bade them hoist the sails, for a breeze had sprung up and was blowing straight towards the harbour.