hard-earned


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hard-earned

adj
obtained or earned through effort or struggle
Translations

hard-earned

[ˈhɑːdˈɜːnd] ADJganado con el sudor de la frente

hard-earned

[ˈhɑːdˌɜːnd] adj (money) → sudato/a, guadagnato/a a fatica; (rest, praise) → meritato/a

hard

(haːd) adjective
1. firm; solid; not easy to break, scratch etc. The ground is too hard to dig.
2. not easy to do, learn, solve etc. Is English a hard language to learn?; He is a hard man to please.
3. not feeling or showing kindness. a hard master.
4. (of weather) severe. a hard winter.
5. having or causing suffering. a hard life; hard times.
6. (of water) containing many chemical salts and so not easily forming bubbles when soap is added. The water is hard in this part of the country.
adverb
1. with great effort. He works very hard; Think hard.
2. with great force; heavily. Don't hit him too hard; It was raining hard.
3. with great attention. He stared hard at the man.
4. to the full extent; completely. The car turned hard right.
ˈharden verb
to make or become hard. Don't touch the toffee till it hardens; Try not to harden your heart against him.
ˈhardness noun
ˈhardship noun
(something which causes) pain, suffering etc. a life full of hardship.
ˈhard-and-fast adjective
(of rules) that can never be changed or ignored.
ˈhard-back noun
a book with a hard cover. Hard-backs are more expensive than paperbacks.
ˌhard-ˈboiled adjective
(of eggs) boiled until the white and the yolk are solid.
hardˈdisk noun
a device that is fixed inside a computer and is used for storing information.
ˈhard-earned adjective
earned by hard work or with difficulty. I deserve every penny of my hard-earned wages.
ˌhard-ˈheaded adjective
practical; shrewd; not influenced by emotion. a hard-headed businessman.
ˌhard-ˈhearted adjective
not feeling or showing pity or kindness. a hard-hearted employer.
ˈhardware noun
1. metal goods such as pots, tools etc. This shop sells hardware.
2. the mechanical parts of a computer.
ˌhard-ˈwearing adjective
that will not wear out easily. a hard-wearing fabric.
be hard on
1. to punish or criticize severely. Don't be too hard on the boy – he's too young to know that he was doing wrong.
2. to be unfair to. If you punish all the children for the broken window it's a bit hard on those who had nothing to do with it.
hard at it
busy doing (something). I've been hard at it all day, trying to get this report finished.
hard done by
unfairly treated. You should complain to the headmaster if you feel hard done by.
hard lines/luck
bad luck. Hard lines/luck! I'm afraid you haven't won this time; It's hard luck that he broke his leg.
hard of hearing
rather deaf. He is a bit hard of hearing now.
a hard time (of it)
trouble, difficulty, worry etc. The audience gave the speaker a hard time of it at the meeting; The speaker had a hard time (of it) trying to make himself heard.
hard up
not having much especially money. I'm a bit hard up at the moment; I'm hard up for envelopes.
References in classic literature ?
But every one of them did what she had set out to do, and sent home those hard-earned dollars.
She would have you out of your hard-earned bed in the middle of the night, doctor, dear, if she took a spell of misery, that she would.
Many of the trappers have squandered in one drunken frolic the hard-earned wages of a year; some have run in debt, and must toil on to pay for past pleasure.
Was, then, the American Revolution effected, was the American Confederacy formed, was the precious blood of thousands spilt, and the hard-earned substance of millions lavished, not that the people of America should enjoy peace, liberty, and safety, but that the government of the individual States, that particular municipal establishments, might enjoy a certain extent of power, and be arrayed with certain dignities and attributes of sovereignty?
I had received my first quarter's wages, and was returning to my lodgings, possessed heart and soul with the pleasant feeling that the master who had paid me grudged every penny of that hard-earned pittance--(I had long ceased to regard Mr.
Although, as a general case, a ship unlucky in falling in with whales continues to cruise after them until she has barely sufficient provisions remaining to take her home, turning round then quietly and making the best of her way to her friends, yet there are instances when even this natural obstacle to the further prosecution of the voyage is overcome by headstrong captains, who, bartering the fruits of their hard-earned toils for a new supply of provisions in some of the ports of Chili or Peru, begin the voyage afresh with unabated zeal and perseverance.
Thousands of the elders, of what were then called the New States[*], broke up from the enjoyment of their hard-earned indulgences, and were to be seen leading long files of descendants, born and reared in the forests of Ohio and Kentucky, deeper into the land, in quest of that which might be termed, without the aid of poetry, their natural and more congenial atmosphere.
Pearce; and damn the coffee; and damn you; and damn my own folly in having lavished MY hard-earned knowledge and the treasure of my regard and intimacy on a heartless guttersnipe.
Jo thought what a blaze her pile of papers upstairs would make, and her hard-earned money lay rather heavily on her conscience at that minute.
As they approached the centre of the town the scene was brightened by a row of well-lit stores, and even more by a cluster of saloons and gaming houses, in which the miners spent their hard-earned but generous wages.
How, for instance, could any one expect to excite sympathy among lovers of good literature by telling how a family found their home alive with vermin, and of all the suffering and inconvenience and humiliation they were put to, and the hard-earned money they spent, in efforts to get rid of them?
Methinks it is more disgrace for one of our garb to wring hard-earned farthings out of the gripe of poor lean peasants.