hard-headed


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hard-headed

adj
1. tough, realistic, or shrewd; not moved by sentiment
2. US and Canadian stubborn; obstinate
ˌhard-ˈheadedly adv
ˌhard-ˈheadedness n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

hard-headed

adjective shrewd, tough, practical, cool, sensible, realistic, pragmatic, astute, hard-boiled (informal), hard-bitten, level-headed, unsentimental, badass (slang, chiefly U.S.) a hard-headed and shrewd businesswoman
sentimental, unrealistic, idealistic, impractical
Translations

hard-headed

[ˈhɑːdˈhedɪd] ADJ (= shrewd) → realista, práctico; (= stubborn) → terco

hard-headed

[ˌhɑːdˈhɛdɪd] adjpratico/a

hard

(haːd) adjective
1. firm; solid; not easy to break, scratch etc. The ground is too hard to dig.
2. not easy to do, learn, solve etc. Is English a hard language to learn?; He is a hard man to please.
3. not feeling or showing kindness. a hard master.
4. (of weather) severe. a hard winter.
5. having or causing suffering. a hard life; hard times.
6. (of water) containing many chemical salts and so not easily forming bubbles when soap is added. The water is hard in this part of the country.
adverb
1. with great effort. He works very hard; Think hard.
2. with great force; heavily. Don't hit him too hard; It was raining hard.
3. with great attention. He stared hard at the man.
4. to the full extent; completely. The car turned hard right.
ˈharden verb
to make or become hard. Don't touch the toffee till it hardens; Try not to harden your heart against him.
ˈhardness noun
ˈhardship noun
(something which causes) pain, suffering etc. a life full of hardship.
ˈhard-and-fast adjective
(of rules) that can never be changed or ignored.
ˈhard-back noun
a book with a hard cover. Hard-backs are more expensive than paperbacks.
ˌhard-ˈboiled adjective
(of eggs) boiled until the white and the yolk are solid.
hardˈdisk noun
a device that is fixed inside a computer and is used for storing information.
ˈhard-earned adjective
earned by hard work or with difficulty. I deserve every penny of my hard-earned wages.
ˌhard-ˈheaded adjective
practical; shrewd; not influenced by emotion. a hard-headed businessman.
ˌhard-ˈhearted adjective
not feeling or showing pity or kindness. a hard-hearted employer.
ˈhardware noun
1. metal goods such as pots, tools etc. This shop sells hardware.
2. the mechanical parts of a computer.
ˌhard-ˈwearing adjective
that will not wear out easily. a hard-wearing fabric.
be hard on
1. to punish or criticize severely. Don't be too hard on the boy – he's too young to know that he was doing wrong.
2. to be unfair to. If you punish all the children for the broken window it's a bit hard on those who had nothing to do with it.
hard at it
busy doing (something). I've been hard at it all day, trying to get this report finished.
hard done by
unfairly treated. You should complain to the headmaster if you feel hard done by.
hard lines/luck
bad luck. Hard lines/luck! I'm afraid you haven't won this time; It's hard luck that he broke his leg.
hard of hearing
rather deaf. He is a bit hard of hearing now.
a hard time (of it)
trouble, difficulty, worry etc. The audience gave the speaker a hard time of it at the meeting; The speaker had a hard time (of it) trying to make himself heard.
hard up
not having much especially money. I'm a bit hard up at the moment; I'm hard up for envelopes.
References in classic literature ?
A little hard-headed, Ripstone pippin-faced man, was conversing with a fat old gentleman in one corner; and two or three more old gentlemen, and two or three more old ladies, sat bolt upright and motionless on their chairs, staring very hard at Mr.
Tell Josiah Bounderby of Coketown, of your district schools and your model schools, and your training schools, and your whole kettle-of-fish of schools; and Josiah Bounderby of Coketown, tells you plainly, all right, all correct - he hadn't such advantages - but let us have hard-headed, solid-fisted people - the education that made him won't do for everybody, he knows well - such and such his education was, however, and you may force him to swallow boiling fat, but you shall never force him to suppress the facts of his life.
A willing, working, soft hearted, not hard-headed fellow, Plornish took his fortune as smoothly as could be expected; but it was a rough one.
I have cross-examined these men, one of them a hard-headed countryman, one a farrier, and one a moorland farmer, who all tell the same story of this dreadful apparition, exactly corresponding to the hell-hound of the legend.
He was a hard-headed, practical man, and farthest from him was any intention of ever reading the books.
He was much older than the Maypole man, being to all appearance five-and- forty; but was one of those self-possessed, hard-headed, imperturbable fellows, who, if they are ever beaten at fisticuffs, or other kind of warfare, never know it, and go on coolly till they win.
He had inherited his father's sordid love of money, without inheriting his father's hard-headed capacity for seeing the uses to which money can be put.
Yes," I said, "I do remember you now; and you are as hard-headed as you were thirteen years ago in that ship, else you wouldn't have punished me so.
A hard-headed, square-shouldered, pertinaciously self-willed man--it was plainly useless to contend with him.
Of course there were exceptions, when some cross-grained, hard-headed fellow came up who would never be happy unless he was quarrelling with his nearest neighbours, or when there was some class-dispute, between the fifth form and the fags, for instance, which required blood-letting; and a champion was picked out on each side tacitly, who settled the matter by a good hearty mill.
Why, in sooth, Little John," said he, "thou hast a blundering hard-headed way that seemeth to bring thee right side uppermost in all thy troubles; but let us see who cometh out best this day.
What evenings, when the candles came, and I was expected to employ myself, but, not daring to read an entertaining book, pored over some hard-headed, harder-hearted treatise on arithmetic; when the tables of weights and measures set themselves to tunes, as 'Rule Britannia', or 'Away with Melancholy'; when they wouldn't stand still to be learnt, but would go threading my grandmother's needle through my unfortunate head, in at one ear and out at the other