hard news

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hard news

n.
News or investigative journalism that deals with serious topics and events.

hard′-news′, hard′news′ adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hard news - news that deals with serious topics or events
news - information reported in a newspaper or news magazine; "the news of my death was greatly exaggerated"
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References in periodicals archive ?
sharing, but has since tried to boost its hard-news credentials.
What explains the success of hard-news letters, such as Kane's Beverage Week, the various Institutional Investor letters and Communications Daily?
CBS covered Afghanistan most heavily yet its hard-news reputation was undermined by a decision to treat pop singer Michael Jackson's untimely death as a major story.
In an introductory essay, Jones describes his career path, from his early days as a college student to work as an AP hard-news photographer and the transition into his current role as a celebrity portrait photographer.
But I'm more of a hard-news kind of gal as it were and, while I really enjoyed filling in, hard news is what I really wanted so I was delighted when the opportunity came up to become news anchor.
On her final appearance on ``Today,'' NBC presented montages honoring her, and even the tribute to her hard-news abilities ended with images of her singing and dancing.
In his move away from fact-based, neutral, impersonal hard-news stories, Gans suggests that journalism needs to focus much more on understanding what leads to, and follows from, events and conditions.
This, he said, was the result of a "post-Watergate 'gotcha' type of journalism" exemplified by "the reassignment of soft news to hard-news reporters as soon as it hits the front page.
Hard-news footage combined with some lighter moments and a few songs of the day thrown in make it great viewing.
A variation on the hard-news format is the hard-news sidebar, which frequently presents factual news content without direct quotations from sources and without excessive detail.
It's kind of crude journalism to blend one's private life with one's public life to bring them down," says Dick Schwarzlose, a journalism professor at Northwestern University, noting that the activist underpinnings of outing could impair the impartiality of hard-news reporters.
Lessons learned: The basic lesson from all three sites is that they're viewed (and view themselves) as hard-news sites -- Cranfill's Dallas operation, for example, broke a worldwide story about Timothy McVey's Oklahoma City bomb confession, and they did it before the print operation had it on the newsstands.