hardy

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Related to hardiest: hardest

har·dy 1

 (här′dē)
adj. har·di·er, har·di·est
1. Able to withstand difficult or adverse conditions; robust: hardy explorers; hardy perennials.
2.
a. Courageous; intrepid.
b. Archaic Brazenly daring; audacious.

[Middle English, from Old French hardi, past participle of hardir, make hard, embolden, of Germanic origin; see kar- in Indo-European roots.]

har′di·ly adv.
har′di·ness n.

click for a larger image
hardy2
left to right: cold-cutting and hot-cutting hardy chisel heads

har·dy 2

 (här′dē)
n. pl. har·dies
A square-shanked chisel that fits into a square hole in an anvil.

[Probably from hard.]

hardy

(ˈhɑːdɪ)
adj, -dier or -diest
1. having or demanding a tough constitution; robust
2. bold; courageous
3. foolhardy; rash
4. (Botany) (of plants) able to live out of doors throughout the winter
[C13: from Old French hardi bold, past participle of hardir to become bold, of Germanic origin; compare Old English hierdan to harden1, Old Norse hertha, Old High German herten]

hardy

(ˈhɑːdɪ)
n, pl -dies
(Tools) any blacksmith's tool made with a square shank so that it can be lodged in a square hole in an anvil
[C19: probably from hard]

Hardy

(ˈhɑːdɪ)
n
1. (Biography) Oliver. See Laurel and Hardy
2. (Biography) Thomas. 1840–1928, British novelist and poet. Most of his novels are set in his native Dorset (part of his fictional Wessex) and include Far from the Madding Crowd (1874), The Return of the Native (1878), The Mayor of Casterbridge (1886), Tess of the d'Urbervilles (1891), and Jude the Obscure (1895), after which his work consisted chiefly of verse
3. (Biography) Sir Thomas Masterman. 1769–1839, British naval officer, flag captain under Nelson (1799–1805): 1st Sea Lord (1830)

har•dy

(ˈhɑr di)

adj. -di•er, -di•est.
1. sturdy; strong: a hardy constitution.
2. (of plants) able to withstand the cold of winter in the open air.
3. requiring great physical courage, vigor, or endurance: hardy sports.
4. courageous: hardy explorers.
5. unduly bold; presumptuous; foolhardy.
[1175–1225; Middle English hardi < Old French, past participle of *hardir to harden, make brave < Germanic; compare Old High German hartjan to harden, Gothic -hardjan]
har′di•ness, n.

Har•dy

(ˈhɑr di)

n.
1. Oliver, 1892–1957, U.S. motion-picture comedian.
2. Thomas, 1840–1928, English novelist and poet.

Hardy

A heavy chisel designed to fit upright in the hardy-hole of an anvil.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hardy - United States slapstick comedian who played the pompous and overbearing member of the Laurel and Hardy duo who made many films (1892-1957)Hardy - United States slapstick comedian who played the pompous and overbearing member of the Laurel and Hardy duo who made many films (1892-1957)
Laurel and Hardy - United States slapstick comedy duo who made many films together
2.hardy - English novelist and poet (1840-1928)Hardy - English novelist and poet (1840-1928)
Adj.1.hardy - having rugged physical strength; inured to fatigue or hardships; "hardy explorers of northern Canada"; "proud of her tall stalwart son"; "stout seamen"; "sturdy young athletes"
robust - sturdy and strong in form, constitution, or construction; "a robust body"; "a robust perennial"
2.hardy - able to survive under unfavorable weather conditions; "strawberries are hardy and easy to grow"; "camels are tough and hardy creatures"
robust - sturdy and strong in form, constitution, or construction; "a robust body"; "a robust perennial"
3.hardy - invulnerable to fear or intimidationhardy - invulnerable to fear or intimidation; "audacious explorers"; "fearless reporters and photographers"; "intrepid pioneers"
bold - fearless and daring; "bold settlers on some foreign shore"; "a bold speech"; "a bold adventure"

hardy

adjective
1. strong, tough, robust, sound, fit, healthy, vigorous, rugged, sturdy, hale, stout, stalwart, hearty, lusty, in fine fettle They grew up to be farmers, round-faced and hardy.
strong soft, weak, delicate, fragile, frail, feeble, sickly, weedy
2. courageous, brave, daring, bold, heroic, manly, gritty, feisty (informal, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), resolute, intrepid, valiant, plucky, valorous, stouthearted A few hardy souls leapt into the encircling seas.
courageous soft, weak, feeble, weedy (informal), faint-hearted, wussy (slang), wimpish or wimpy (informal)

hardy

adjective
1. Physically toughened so as to have great endurance:
2. Capable of exerting considerable effort or of withstanding considerable stress or hardship:
Translations
جَريء ، شُجاع
otužilý
hårdfør
harîger, harîur
ištvermingumas
izturīgsnorūdīts
otužilý

hardy

[ˈhɑːdɪ] ADJ (hardier (compar) (hardiest (superl))) → fuerte, robusto (Bot) → resistente

hardy

[ˈhɑːrdi] adj
[person, animal] → robuste
[plant] → résistant(e) au gel

hardy

adj (+er)
(= tough, robust) person, animalrobust, zäh; (= hardened)abgehärtet; (Bot) plantwinterhart
(= bold) personunerschrocken

hardy

[ˈhɑːdɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) → forte, robusto/a (Bot) → resistente al gelo

hardy

(ˈhaːdi) adjective
tough; strong; able to bear cold, tiredness etc. This plant is very hardy and able to survive even rough winter weather.
ˈhardiness noun
References in classic literature ?
I, too, in the grey, small, antique structure, with its low roof, its latticed casements, its mouldering walls, its avenue of aged firs--all grown aslant under the stress of mountain winds; its garden, dark with yew and holly--and where no flowers but of the hardiest species would bloom--found a charm both potent and permanent.
By careful selection they rear only the hardiest specimens of each species, and with almost supernatural foresight they regulate the birth rate to merely offset the loss by death.
In point of endurance it was acknowledged that he could kill the hardiest of them.
Even the hardiest of them heartily disliked the turn and the man, although Duckworth, and Duckworth's Trained Cats and Rats, were an invariable popular success.
A band of Pawnees or of Blackfeet may occasionally traverse it in order to reach other hunting-grounds, but the hardiest of the braves are glad to lose sight of those awesome plains, and to find themselves once more upon their prairies.
New stock includes Pretty Maiden, a two-tiered, pink hydrangea that grows 3 to 4 feet tall and 4 to 5 feet wide; Blue Light, huge, double pale blue and violet clematis with blossoms 5 to 6 inches across; and Mandarin, one of the hardiest honeysuckles, with large orange-red blooms and a pale yellow throat, on vines 6 to 7 feet high.
Fuchsia magellanica is the hardiest of all fuchsias.
Where winters are severe, plant English lavender this is the hardiest form of lavender and the one best adapted to our particular climate.
NORTH-East people are the hardiest in Britain, using their heating less than anyone else in the UK, despite being exposed to some of the coldest temperatures, a survey reveals.
The musa basjoo is the hardiest of all if you think you might get away with leaving it outside throughout the year.
The Rolling Stones may be one of rock 'n' roll's hardiest bands, but their Russian fans - who've waited 31 years to hear them perform in Moscow - are hardier.
IT MAY be lewd, crude and as in your face as a full moon from the window of a passing car, but there's no denying the action in Fairway To Heaven has the power to make the hardiest of the politically correct crack into a smile.