hare

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hare

 (hâr)
n.
Any of various mammals of the family Leporidae, especially of the genus Lepus, similar to rabbits but having longer ears and legs and giving birth to active, furred young.
intr.v. hared, har·ing, hares
To move hurriedly, as if hunting a swift quarry.

[Middle English, from Old English hara; see kas- in Indo-European roots.]

hare

(hɛə)
n, pl hares or hare
1. (Animals) any solitary leporid mammal of the genus Lepus, such as L. europaeus (European hare). Hares are larger than rabbits, having longer ears and legs, and live in shallow nests (forms).
2. make a hare of someone informal Irish to defeat someone completely
3. run with the hare and hunt with the hounds to be on good terms with both sides
vb
(intr; often foll by off, after, etc) informal Brit to go or run fast or wildly
[Old English hara; related to Old Norse heri, Old High German haso, Swedish hare, Sanskrit śaśá]
ˈhareˌlike adj

Hare

(hɛə)
n
1. (Biography) Sir David. born 1947, British dramatist and theatre director: his plays include Plenty (1978), Pravda (with Howard Brenton, 1985), The Secret Rapture (1989), Racing Demon (1990), The Permanent Way (2003), and Stuff Happens (2004)
2. (Biography) William. 19th century, Irish murderer and bodysnatcher: associate of William Burke

Hare

(hɛə)
n
(Peoples) a member of a Dene Native Canadian people of northern Canada
[of Athapascan origin]

hare

(hɛər)

n., pl. hares, (esp. collectively) hare.
any of several long-eared, hopping lagomorphs of the family Leporidae, esp. of the genus Lepus, closely related to the rabbits but usu. larger and characteristically bearing well-developed young.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English hara; akin to Middle Dutch haese, Old High German haso, Old Norse heri hare]
hare′like`, adj.

hare

(hâr)
Any of various mammals similar to rabbits but having longer ears and legs and giving birth to active, furred young. Most hares are burrowing animals but do not make extensive warrens the way rabbits do.

hare

, rabbit, jackrabbit - Hares live in the open and bear young that have fur at birth, while rabbits live in burrows and bear young that are naked at birth; jackrabbits are hares, not rabbits.
See also related terms for naked.

hare


Past participle: hared
Gerund: haring

Imperative
hare
hare
Present
I hare
you hare
he/she/it hares
we hare
you hare
they hare
Preterite
I hared
you hared
he/she/it hared
we hared
you hared
they hared
Present Continuous
I am haring
you are haring
he/she/it is haring
we are haring
you are haring
they are haring
Present Perfect
I have hared
you have hared
he/she/it has hared
we have hared
you have hared
they have hared
Past Continuous
I was haring
you were haring
he/she/it was haring
we were haring
you were haring
they were haring
Past Perfect
I had hared
you had hared
he/she/it had hared
we had hared
you had hared
they had hared
Future
I will hare
you will hare
he/she/it will hare
we will hare
you will hare
they will hare
Future Perfect
I will have hared
you will have hared
he/she/it will have hared
we will have hared
you will have hared
they will have hared
Future Continuous
I will be haring
you will be haring
he/she/it will be haring
we will be haring
you will be haring
they will be haring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been haring
you have been haring
he/she/it has been haring
we have been haring
you have been haring
they have been haring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been haring
you will have been haring
he/she/it will have been haring
we will have been haring
you will have been haring
they will have been haring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been haring
you had been haring
he/she/it had been haring
we had been haring
you had been haring
they had been haring
Conditional
I would hare
you would hare
he/she/it would hare
we would hare
you would hare
they would hare
Past Conditional
I would have hared
you would have hared
he/she/it would have hared
we would have hared
you would have hared
they would have hared
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hare - swift timid long-eared mammal larger than a rabbit having a divided upper lip and long hind legshare - swift timid long-eared mammal larger than a rabbit having a divided upper lip and long hind legs; young born furred and with open eyes
leporid, leporid mammal - rabbits and hares
genus Lepus, Lepus - type genus of the Leporidae: hares
leveret - a young hare especially one in its first year
European hare, Lepus europaeus - large hare introduced in North America; does not turn white in winter
jackrabbit - large hare of western North America
Arctic hare, Lepus arcticus, polar hare - a large hare of northern North America; it is almost completely white in winter
Lepus americanus, snowshoe hare, snowshoe rabbit, varying hare - large large-footed North American hare; white in winter
hare, rabbit - flesh of any of various rabbits or hares (wild or domesticated) eaten as food
2.hare - flesh of any of various rabbits or hares (wild or domesticated) eaten as food
European rabbit, Old World rabbit, Oryctolagus cuniculus - common greyish-brown burrowing animal native to southern Europe and northern Africa but introduced elsewhere; widely domesticated and developed in various colors and for various needs; young are born naked and helpless
cottontail, cottontail rabbit, wood rabbit - common small rabbit of North America having greyish or brownish fur and a tail with a white underside; a host for Ixodes pacificus and Ixodes scapularis (Lyme disease ticks)
hare - swift timid long-eared mammal larger than a rabbit having a divided upper lip and long hind legs; young born furred and with open eyes
game - the flesh of wild animals that is used for food
Verb1.hare - run quickly, like a hare; "He hared down the hill"
run - move fast by using one's feet, with one foot off the ground at any given time; "Don't run--you'll be out of breath"; "The children ran to the store"

hare

noun
Related words
adjective leporine
male buck
female doe
young leveret
habitation down, husk
see rabbits and hares
Translations
заек
zajíczaječice
hare
leporo
jänis
खरहाखारगोश
zec
nyúlmezei nyúl
héri
野ウサギ
산토끼
lepus
zaķis
zajac
zajeczajklja
hare
กระต่ายป่า
thỏ rừng

hare

[hɛəʳ]
A. N (hares or hare (pl)) → liebre f
first catch your hareno hay que empezar por el tejado
B. VIir a todo correr, ir a toda pastilla
to hare away or offirse a todo correr or a toda pastilla, salir disparado
to hare in/out/through (Brit) → entrar/salir/pasar a todo correr or a toda pastilla
he went haring pastpasó como un rayo

hare

[ˈhɛər]
nlièvre m
hare off
vipartir en trombehare-brained [ˈhɛərbreɪnd] adj [scheme] → farfelu(e); [person] → farfelu(e)

hare

n(Feld)hase m; hare and hounds (= game)Schnitzeljagd f; to run with the hare and hunt with the hounds (prov) → es mit niemandem verderben wollen; to start a hare (fig)vom Thema ablenken ? mad
vi (Brit inf) → sausen, flitzen (inf); to hare offlossausen or -flitzen (inf)

hare

:
harebell
nGlockenblume f
harebrained
adj person, planverrückt, behämmert (inf)
harelip
nHasenscharte f

hare

[hɛəʳ] nlepre f

hare

(heə) noun
an animal with long ears, like a rabbit but slightly larger.

hare

أَرْنَبٌ بَرِّيَّة zajíc hare Hase λαγός liebre jänis lièvre zec lepre 野ウサギ 산토끼 haas hare zając lebre заяц hare กระต่ายป่า yabani tavşan thỏ rừng 野兔
References in classic literature ?
Whatever pale fears and forebodings some of them might have felt before; these were not only now kept out of sight through the growing awe of Ahab, but they were broken up, and on all sides routed, as timid prairie hares that scatter before the bounding bison.
I don't know what hare; likely enough it may be one of our own hares out of the woods; any hare they can find will do for the dogs and men to run after;" and before long the dogs began their "yo
The emperor said it was--but charitably advised him to go and hunt hares and not endanger so precious a life as his in an attempt which had brought death to so many of the world's most illustrious heroes.
The staid, sober, thinking and industrious ones of our number would employ themselves in making corn-brooms, mats, horse-collars, and baskets; and another class of us would spend the time in hunting opossums, hares, and coons.
In the stone face over the great window of the bed-chamber where the murder was done, two fine dints were pointed out in the sculptured nose, which everybody recognised, and which nobody had seen of old; and on the scarce occasions when two or three ragged peasants emerged from the crowd to take a hurried peep at Monsieur the Marquis petrified, a skinny finger would not have pointed to it for a minute, before they all started away among the moss and leaves, like the more fortunate hares who could find a living there.
Swine's flesh, dressed in several modes, appeared on the lower part of the board, as also that of fowls, deer, goats, and hares, and various kinds of fish, together with huge loaves and cakes of bread, and sundry confections made of fruits and honey.
Countless were the hares ready skinned and the plucked fowls that hung on the trees for burial in the pots, numberless the wildfowl and game of various sorts suspended from the branches that the air might keep them cool.
In the old days he used to be taken out by the young men when they went hunting wild goats, or deer, or hares, but now that his master was gone he was lying neglected on the heaps of mule and cow dung that lay in front of the stable doors till the men should come and draw it away to manure the great close; and he was full of fleas.
The women were badly clad; the children worse; their garments were buffalo robes, or the skins of foxes, hares, and badgers, and sometimes the skins of ducks, sewed together, with the plumage on.
With that they went into the castle together, and found a great many servants there, and the rooms all richly furnished, and full of golden chairs and tables; and behind the castle was a garden, and around it was a park half a mile long, full of sheep, and goats, and hares, and deer; and in the courtyard were stables and cow-houses.
Above them rose the primeval yews and oaks of The Chase, in which there poised gentle roosting birds in their last nap; and about them stole the hopping rabbits and hares.
Such men, therefore, are not the object of law; for they are themselves a law: and it would be ridiculous in any one to endeavour to include them in the penalties of a law: for probably they might say what Antisthenes tells us the lions did to the hares when they demanded to be admitted to an equal share with them in the government.