harmonic


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harmonic
Visual representation of harmonics in the periodic motion of a vibrating guitar string. First (or fundamental) harmonic (top), second harmonic (center), and sixth harmonic (bottom).

har·mon·ic

 (här-mŏn′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to harmony.
b. Pleasing to the ear: harmonic orchestral effects.
c. Characterized by harmony: a harmonic liturgical chant.
2. Of or relating to harmonics.
3. Integrated in nature.
n.
1.
a. Any of a series of musical tones whose frequencies are integral multiples of the frequency of a fundamental tone.
b. A tone produced on a stringed instrument by lightly touching an open or stopped vibrating string at a given fraction of its length so that both segments vibrate. Also called overtone, partial, partial tone.
2. harmonics(used with a sing. verb) The theory or study of the physical properties and characteristics of musical sound.
3. Physics Any of a series of periodic waves whose frequencies are integral multiples of a fundamental frequency.

[Latin harmonicus, from Greek harmonikos, from harmoniā, harmony; see harmony.]

har·mon′i·cal·ly adv.

harmonic

(hɑːˈmɒnɪk)
adj
1. of, involving, producing, or characterized by harmony; harmonious
2. (Music, other) music of, relating to, or belonging to harmony
3. (Mathematics) maths
a. capable of expression in the form of sine and cosine functions
b. of or relating to numbers whose reciprocals form an arithmetic progression
4. (General Physics) physics of or concerned with an oscillation that has a frequency that is an integral multiple of a fundamental frequency
5. (General Physics) physics of or concerned with harmonics
n
6. (Music, other) physics music a component of a periodic quantity, such as a musical tone, with a frequency that is an integral multiple of the fundamental frequency. The first harmonic is the fundamental, the second harmonic (twice the fundamental frequency) is the first overtone, the third harmonic (three times the fundamental frequency) is the second overtone, etc
7. (General Physics) physics music a component of a periodic quantity, such as a musical tone, with a frequency that is an integral multiple of the fundamental frequency. The first harmonic is the fundamental, the second harmonic (twice the fundamental frequency) is the first overtone, the third harmonic (three times the fundamental frequency) is the second overtone, etc
8. (Music, other) music (not in technical use) overtone: in this case, the first overtone is the first harmonic, etc
[C16: from Latin harmonicus relating to harmony]
harˈmonically adv

har•mon•ic

(hɑrˈmɒn ɪk)

adj.
1. pertaining to harmony, as distinguished from melody and rhythm.
2. marked by harmony; in harmony; concordant; consonant.
3. of, pertaining to, or noting a series of oscillations in which each oscillation has a frequency that is an integral multiple of the same basic frequency.
4. Math.
a. (of a set of values) related in a manner analogous to the frequencies of tones that are consonant.
b. capable of being represented by sine and cosine functions.
n.
6. a single oscillation whose frequency is an integral multiple of the fundamental frequency.
[1560–70; < Latin harmonicus < Greek harmonikós musical, suitable. See harmony, -ic]
har•mon′i•cal•ly, adv.
har•mon′i•cal•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.harmonic - a tone that is a component of a complex sound
pure tone, tone - a steady sound without overtones; "they tested his hearing with pure tones of different frequencies"
first harmonic, fundamental frequency, fundamental - the lowest tone of a harmonic series
partial tone, overtone, partial - a harmonic with a frequency that is a multiple of the fundamental frequency
2.harmonic - any of a series of musical tones whose frequencies are integral multiples of the frequency of a fundamental
timbre, tone, quality, timber - (music) the distinctive property of a complex sound (a voice or noise or musical sound); "the timbre of her soprano was rich and lovely"; "the muffled tones of the broken bell summoned them to meet"
Adj.1.harmonic - of or relating to harmony as distinct from melody and rhythm; "subtleties of harmonic change and tonality"- Ralph Hill
nonharmonic - not harmonic; "a nonharmonic note"
2.harmonic - of or relating to harmonics
3.harmonic - of or relating to the branch of acoustics that studies the composition of musical sounds; "the sound of the resonating cavity cannot be the only determinant of the harmonic response"
4.harmonic - relating to vibrations that occur as a result of vibrations in a nearby body; "sympathetic vibration"
harmonious - musically pleasing
5.harmonic - involving or characterized by harmony
harmonious - musically pleasing

harmonic

adjective
Characterized by harmony of sound:
Translations
تَوافُقي النَّغَم ، مُؤْتَلِف
harmonický
harmonisk
ahenkli

harmonic

[hɑːˈmɒnɪk] ADJarmónico

harmonic

[hɑːrˈmɒnɪk] adjharmonique

harmonic

n (Mus) → Oberton m
adj (Mus, Phys) → harmonisch

harmonic

[hɑːˈmɒnɪk] adjarmonico/a

harmony

(ˈhaːməni) plural ˈharmonies noun
1. (of musical sounds, colours etc) (the state of forming) a pleasing combination. The singers sang in harmony.
2. the agreement of people's feelings, opinions etc. Few married couples live in perfect harmony.
harˈmonic (-ˈmo-) adjective
of, or concerned with, especially musical harmony.
harˈmonious (-ˈməu-) adjective
1. pleasant-sounding. a harmonious melody.
2. pleasant to the eye. a harmonious colour scheme.
3. without disagreement or bad feeling. a harmonious relationship.
harˈmoniously adverb
harˈmoniousness noun
ˈharmonize, ˈharmonise verb
1. to sing or play musical instruments in harmony.
2. to add different parts to (a melody) to form harmonies.
3. to (cause to) be in harmony or agreement. The colours in this room harmonize nicely.
harmoniˈzation, harmoniˈsation noun
References in classic literature ?
The coroner is to sit in the first-floor room at the Sol's Arms, where the Harmonic Meetings take place twice a week and where the chair is filled by a gentleman of professional celebrity, faced by Little Swills, the comic vocalist, who hopes
He is conducted by the beadle and the landlord to the Harmonic Meeting Room, where he puts his hat on the piano and takes a Windsor-chair at the head of a long table formed of several short tables put together and ornamented with glutinous rings in endless involutions, made by pots and glasses.
It is considered not unlikely that he will get up an imitation of the coroner and make it the principal feature of the Harmonic Meeting in the evenlng.
The beadle is very careful that two gentlemen not very neat about the cuffs and buttons (for whose accommodation he has provided a special little table near the coroner in the Harmonic Meeting Room) should see all that is to be seen.
The Harmonic Meeting hour arriving, the gentleman of professional celebrity takes the chair, is faced
The jingling piano at last is silent, and the Harmonic friends rally round their pillows.
He belonged, in fact, to none of the numerous societies which swarm in the English capital, from the Harmonic to that of the Entomologists, founded mainly for the purpose of abolishing pernicious insects.
The club received him with transport, and held an harmonic meeting that evening in his honour; while Mrs.
These then, though unbeheld in deep of night, Shine not in vain, nor think, though men were none, That heav'n would want spectators, God want praise; Millions of spiritual Creatures walk the Earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep: All these with ceasless praise his works behold Both day and night: how often from the steep Of echoing Hill or Thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive each to others note Singing thir great Creator: oft in bands While they keep watch, or nightly rounding walk With Heav'nly touch of instrumental sounds In full harmonic number joind, thir songs Divide the night, and lift our thoughts to Heaven.
the ear of Handel predict the witchcraft of harmonic sound?
We conducted a prospective, double-blind clinical trial to evaluate the differences in operating time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative pain at 3 hours and 1 week, and delayed (>24 hr) bleeding associated with ultrasonic harmonic scalpel tonsillectomy and conventional tonsillectomy.
com/reports/c50413) has announced the addition of the new Frost & Sullivan Report "World Harmonic Filter Markets" to their offering.