harmonics


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harmonic
Visual representation of harmonics in the periodic motion of a vibrating guitar string. First (or fundamental) harmonic (top), second harmonic (center), and sixth harmonic (bottom).

har·mon·ic

 (här-mŏn′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to harmony.
b. Pleasing to the ear: harmonic orchestral effects.
c. Characterized by harmony: a harmonic liturgical chant.
2. Of or relating to harmonics.
3. Integrated in nature.
n.
1.
a. Any of a series of musical tones whose frequencies are integral multiples of the frequency of a fundamental tone.
b. A tone produced on a stringed instrument by lightly touching an open or stopped vibrating string at a given fraction of its length so that both segments vibrate. Also called overtone, partial, partial tone.
2. harmonics(used with a sing. verb) The theory or study of the physical properties and characteristics of musical sound.
3. Physics Any of a series of periodic waves whose frequencies are integral multiples of a fundamental frequency.

[Latin harmonicus, from Greek harmonikos, from harmoniā, harmony; see harmony.]

har·mon′i·cal·ly adv.

harmonics

(hɑːˈmɒnɪks)
n
1. (Music, other) (functioning as singular) the science of musical sounds and their acoustic properties
2. (Music, other) (functioning as plural) the overtones of a fundamental note, as produced by lightly touching the string of a stringed instrument at one of its node points while playing. See harmonic6

har•mon•ics

(hɑrˈmɒn ɪks)

n.
1. (used with a sing. v.) the science of musical sounds.
2. (used with a pl. v.) the partials or overtones of a fundamental tone.
3. (used with a pl. v.) the flutelike tones of the strings of a stringed instrument made to vibrate to produce overtones.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.harmonics - the study of musical sound
acoustics - the study of the physical properties of sound
Translations

harmonics

[hɑːˈmɒnɪks] Narmonía f

harmonics

[hɑːrˈmɒnɪks] nplharmoniques mpl or fpl

harmonics

n singHarmonik f

harmonics

[hɑːˈmɒnɪks]
1. npl (Mus) → armonia
2. nsg (Phys) → armonica
References in classic literature ?
The coroner is to sit in the first-floor room at the Sol's Arms, where the Harmonic Meetings take place twice a week and where the chair is filled by a gentleman of professional celebrity, faced by Little Swills, the comic vocalist, who hopes
He belonged, in fact, to none of the numerous societies which swarm in the English capital, from the Harmonic to that of the Entomologists, founded mainly for the purpose of abolishing pernicious insects.
The club received him with transport, and held an harmonic meeting that evening in his honour; while Mrs.