harness


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Related to harness: harness racing

har·ness

 (här′nĭs)
n.
1. The gear or tackle, other than a yoke, with which a draft animal pulls a vehicle or implement.
2. Something resembling such gear or tackle, as the arrangement of straps used to hold a parachute to the body.
3. A device that raises and lowers the warp threads on a loom.
4. Archaic Armor for a man or horse.
tr.v. har·nessed, har·ness·ing, har·ness·es
1.
a. To put a harness on (a draft animal).
b. To fasten by the use of a harness.
2. To bring under control and direct the force of: If you can harness your energy, you will accomplish a great deal.
Idiom:
in harness
On duty or at work.

[Middle English harnes, from Old French harneis, of Germanic origin; see nes- in Indo-European roots.]

har′ness·er n.

harness

(ˈhɑːnɪs)
n
1. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) an arrangement of leather straps buckled or looped together, fitted to a draught animal in order that the animal can be attached to and pull a cart
2. something resembling this, esp for attaching something to the body: a parachute harness.
3. (Mountaineering) mountaineering an arrangement of webbing straps that enables a climber to attach himself to the rope so that the impact of a fall is minimized
4. (Electrical Engineering) the total system of electrical leads for a vehicle or aircraft
5. (Knitting & Sewing) weaving the part of a loom that raises and lowers the warp threads, creating the shed
6. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) archaic armour collectively
7. in harness at one's routine work
vb (tr)
8. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) to put harness on (a horse)
9. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) (usually foll by to) to attach (a draught animal) by means of harness to (a cart, etc)
10. to control so as to employ the energy or potential power of: to harness the atom.
11. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) to equip or clothe with armour
[C13: from Old French harneis baggage, probably from Old Norse hernest (unattested) provisions, from herr army + nest provisions]
ˈharnesser n
ˈharnessless adj
ˈharness-ˌlike adj

har•ness

(ˈhɑr nɪs)

n.
1. the combination of straps, bands, and other parts forming the working gear of a draft animal. Compare yoke (def. 1).
2. (on a loom) the frame containing heddles through which the warp threads are drawn.
3. armor for persons or horses.
v.t.
4. to put a harness on (a horse, donkey, dog, etc.); attach by a harness, as to a vehicle.
5. to bring under conditions for effective use; gain control over for a particular end: to harness water power.
6. Archaic. to array in armor or equipments of war.
Idioms:
in harness, engaged in one's usual routine; working.
[1250–1300; Middle English harneis, herneis < Old French herneis baggage, equipment]

harness


Past participle: harnessed
Gerund: harnessing

Imperative
harness
harness
Present
I harness
you harness
he/she/it harnesses
we harness
you harness
they harness
Preterite
I harnessed
you harnessed
he/she/it harnessed
we harnessed
you harnessed
they harnessed
Present Continuous
I am harnessing
you are harnessing
he/she/it is harnessing
we are harnessing
you are harnessing
they are harnessing
Present Perfect
I have harnessed
you have harnessed
he/she/it has harnessed
we have harnessed
you have harnessed
they have harnessed
Past Continuous
I was harnessing
you were harnessing
he/she/it was harnessing
we were harnessing
you were harnessing
they were harnessing
Past Perfect
I had harnessed
you had harnessed
he/she/it had harnessed
we had harnessed
you had harnessed
they had harnessed
Future
I will harness
you will harness
he/she/it will harness
we will harness
you will harness
they will harness
Future Perfect
I will have harnessed
you will have harnessed
he/she/it will have harnessed
we will have harnessed
you will have harnessed
they will have harnessed
Future Continuous
I will be harnessing
you will be harnessing
he/she/it will be harnessing
we will be harnessing
you will be harnessing
they will be harnessing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been harnessing
you have been harnessing
he/she/it has been harnessing
we have been harnessing
you have been harnessing
they have been harnessing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been harnessing
you will have been harnessing
he/she/it will have been harnessing
we will have been harnessing
you will have been harnessing
they will have been harnessing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been harnessing
you had been harnessing
he/she/it had been harnessing
we had been harnessing
you had been harnessing
they had been harnessing
Conditional
I would harness
you would harness
he/she/it would harness
we would harness
you would harness
they would harness
Past Conditional
I would have harnessed
you would have harnessed
he/she/it would have harnessed
we would have harnessed
you would have harnessed
they would have harnessed

Harness

Mostly made of leather straps, a harness is used to connect draft animals like horses to loads to be pulled. The key to the success of the horse as an efficient pulling machine is in the design of a harness that allows his strength to be transmitted to the load to be pulled without impairing breathing or blood circulation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Harness - a support consisting of an arrangement of straps for holding something to the body (especially one supporting a person suspended from a parachute)harness - a support consisting of an arrangement of straps for holding something to the body (especially one supporting a person suspended from a parachute)
chute, parachute - rescue equipment consisting of a device that fills with air and retards your fall
support - any device that bears the weight of another thing; "there was no place to attach supports for a shelf"
2.harness - stable gear consisting of an arrangement of leather straps fitted to a draft animal so that it can be attached to and pull a cart
bridle - headgear for a horse; includes a headstall and bit and reins to give the rider or driver control
cinch, girth - stable gear consisting of a band around a horse's belly that holds the saddle in place
hackamore, halter - rope or canvas headgear for a horse, with a rope for leading
headgear - stable gear consisting of any part of a harness that fits about the horse's head
martingale - a harness strap that connects the nose piece to the girth; prevents the horse from throwing back its head
saddlery, stable gear, tack - gear for a horse
trace - either of two lines that connect a horse's harness to a wagon or other vehicle or to a whiffletree
Verb1.harness - put a harness; "harness the horse"
animal husbandry - breeding and caring for farm animals
attach - cause to be attached
inspan - attach a yoke or harness to; "inspan the draft animals"
unharness - remove the harness from; "unharness a horse"
2.harness - exploit the power of; "harness natural forces and resources"
exploit, tap - draw from; make good use of; "we must exploit the resources we are given wisely"
3.harness - control and direct with or as if by reins; "rein a horse"
control, command - exercise authoritative control or power over; "control the budget"; "Command the military forces"
4.harness - keep in check; "rule one's temper"
confine, limit, throttle, trammel, restrain, restrict, bound - place limits on (extent or access); "restrict the use of this parking lot"; "limit the time you can spend with your friends"

harness

verb
1. exploit, control, channel, apply, employ, utilize, mobilize, make productive, turn to account, render useful the movement's ability to harness the anger of all Ukrainians
2. put in harness, couple, saddle, yoke, hitch up the horses were harnessed to a heavy wagon
noun
1. equipment, tackle, gear, tack, trappings Always check that the straps of the harness are properly adjusted.
in harness
1. working, together, in a team At Opera North he will be in harness with Paul Daniel.
2. at work, working, employed, active, busy, in action The longing for work will return and you will be right back in harness.
Translations
سَرْج، عُدَّهيُسَخِّر، يَسْتَخْدِميُسْرِجُ
okšírovatpostrojvyužít
seletøjudnytte
valjaat
befoghámhasznosít
aktygileggja aktygi viîvirkja
kinkytipajungtipakinktai
iejūgsiejūgtizmantot
ošírovaťpostroj
konjska vprega
enerji üretimi için kullanmakkoşmakkoşum takımıkoşum vurmak

harness

[ˈhɑːnɪs]
A. N (for horse) → arreos mpl, jaeces mpl; (= safety harness) (for walking a child) → andadores mpl, correas fpl; (on high chair, baby seat) → correas fpl de sujeción or seguridad; (for mountaineer etc) → arnés m
to work in harness (with)trabajar conjuntamente (con)
to die in harnessmorir con las botas puestas
to get back in harnessvolver al trabajo
B. VT
1. (lit) [+ horse] → enjaezar, poner los arreos a; (to carriage) → enganchar
to harness a horse to a cartenganchar un caballo a un carro
2. (fig) [+ resources, energy] → utilizar, aprovechar
C. CPD harness race Ncarrera f de trotones

harness

[ˈhɑːrnɪs]
n
[horse] → harnais m
(also safety harness) → harnais m
vt
[+ resources, power, potential] → exploiter; [+ emotions, skills, talents] → exploiter
[+ animal] → atteler

harness

n
Geschirr nt; to be back in harness (fig)wieder bei der Arbeit or im gewohnten Trott sein; to work in harness (fig)zusammenarbeiten; to die in harness (fig: often hum)in den Sielen sterben
(of parachute)Gurtwerk nt; (for baby) → Laufgurt m
(Elec) → Kabelbaum m
vt
horseanschirren, aufzäumen; a horse that has never been harnessedein Pferd, das nie im Geschirr gegangen ist; to harness a horse to a carriageein Pferd vor einen Wagen spannen
(= utilize)nutzen; river etc alsonutzbar machen; anger etcnutzen, sich (dat)zunutze or zu Nutze machen

harness

[ˈhɑːnɪs]
1. n (for horse) → bardatura, finimenti mpl; (for baby) → briglie fpl; (safety harness) → imbracatura
to get back into harness (fig) → tornare al lavoro consueto
to die in harness (fig) → morire sul lavoro or sulla breccia
2. vt (horse) → bardare, mettere i finimenti a; (to carriage) → attaccare a; (resources) → sfruttare

harness

(ˈhaːnis) noun
the leather straps etc by which a horse is attached to a cart etc which it is pulling and by means of which it is controlled.
verb
1. to put the harness on (a horse).
2. to make use of (a source of power, eg a river) for some purpose, eg to produce electricity or to drive machinery. Attempts are now being made to harness the sun as a source of heat and power.

harness

n. cinturón corrector.
References in classic literature ?
I do not want to harness you to a needless expense that will pre- vent your making progress.
The black ground-shadows were already crowding over the heap in the road, and one horse ran out across the fields, his harness hanging to him, wolves at his heels.
Under this were hung flails, harness, various utensils of husbandry, and nets for fishing in the neighboring river.
Aware of their danger, they were going all abreast with great speed straight before the wind, rubbing their flanks as closely as so many spans of horses in harness.
He must never start at what he sees, nor speak to other horses, nor bite, nor kick, nor have any will of his own; but always do his master's will, even though he may be very tired or hungry; but the worst of all is, when his harness is once on, he may neither jump for joy nor lie down for weariness.
She was a native and essential cook, as much as Aunt Chloe,-- cooking being an indigenous talent of the African race; but Chloe was a trained and methodical one, who moved in an orderly domestic harness, while Dinah was a self-taught genius, and, like geniuses in general, was positive, opinionated and erratic, to the last degree.
By long years of patient industry and reading of the newspapers--for what are the libraries of science but files of newspapers--a man accumulates a myriad facts, lays them up in his memory, and then when in some spring of his life he saunters abroad into the Great Fields of thought, he, as it were, goes to grass like a horse and leaves all his harness behind in the stable.
There Sir Launcelot unarmed him, and set his harness by him, and went to bed, and anon he fell on sleep.
As we approached the Kaiserstuhl, a part of the harness gave way.
Suddenly he heard a small voice above the rattle and rumble of the wheels and the creaking of the harness.
Time enough to break her to harness when she gets a little older.
He walked up hill in the mire by the side of the mail, as the rest of the passengers did; not because they had the least relish for walking exercise, under the circumstances, but because the hill, and the harness, and the mud, and the mail, were all so heavy, that the horses had three times already come to a stop, besides once drawing the coach across the road, with the mutinous intent of taking it back to Blackheath.