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harp

harp

 (härp)
n.
1. Music
a. An instrument having an upright triangular frame consisting of a pillar, a curved neck, and a hollow back containing the sounding board, with usually 46 or 47 strings of graded lengths that are played by plucking with the fingers.
b. Any of various ancient and modern instruments of similar or U-shaped design.
c. Informal A harmonica.
2. Something, such as a pair of vertical supports for a lampshade, that resembles a harp.
intr.v. harped, harp·ing, harps
To play a harp.
Phrasal Verb:
harp on
To talk or write about to an excessive and tedious degree; dwell on.

[Middle English, from Old English hearpe and from Old French harpe, of Germanic origin.]

harp′er n.
harp′ist n.

harp

(hɑːp)
n
1. (Instruments) a large triangular plucked stringed instrument consisting of a soundboard connected to an upright pillar by means of a curved crossbar from which the strings extend downwards. The strings are tuned diatonically and may be raised in pitch either one or two semitones by the use of pedals (double-action harp). Basic key: B major; range: nearly seven octaves
2. something resembling this, esp in shape
3. (Instruments) an informal name (esp in pop music) for harmonica
vb
4. (Instruments) (intr) to play the harp
5. (tr) archaic to speak; utter; express
6. (intr; foll by on or upon) to speak or write in a persistent and tedious manner
[Old English hearpe; related to Old Norse harpa, Old High German harfa, Latin corbis basket, Russian korobit to warp]
ˈharper, ˈharpist n

harp

(hɑrp)

n.
1. a musical instrument consisting of a triangular frame formed by a soundbox, a pillar, and a curved neck, and having strings stretched between the soundbox and the neck that are plucked with the fingers.
2. a harp-shaped implement or device.
3. a vertical metal frame shaped to bend around the bulb in a standing lamp and used to support a lamp shade.
v.i.
4. to play on a harp.
5. harp on or upon, to repeat interminably and tediously.
[before 900; Middle English harpe, Old English hearpe, c. Old Saxon, Old Norse harpa, Old High German harfa]
harp′er, n.

harp


Past participle: harped
Gerund: harping

Imperative
harp
harp
Present
I harp
you harp
he/she/it harps
we harp
you harp
they harp
Preterite
I harped
you harped
he/she/it harped
we harped
you harped
they harped
Present Continuous
I am harping
you are harping
he/she/it is harping
we are harping
you are harping
they are harping
Present Perfect
I have harped
you have harped
he/she/it has harped
we have harped
you have harped
they have harped
Past Continuous
I was harping
you were harping
he/she/it was harping
we were harping
you were harping
they were harping
Past Perfect
I had harped
you had harped
he/she/it had harped
we had harped
you had harped
they had harped
Future
I will harp
you will harp
he/she/it will harp
we will harp
you will harp
they will harp
Future Perfect
I will have harped
you will have harped
he/she/it will have harped
we will have harped
you will have harped
they will have harped
Future Continuous
I will be harping
you will be harping
he/she/it will be harping
we will be harping
you will be harping
they will be harping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been harping
you have been harping
he/she/it has been harping
we have been harping
you have been harping
they have been harping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been harping
you will have been harping
he/she/it will have been harping
we will have been harping
you will have been harping
they will have been harping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been harping
you had been harping
he/she/it had been harping
we had been harping
you had been harping
they had been harping
Conditional
I would harp
you would harp
he/she/it would harp
we would harp
you would harp
they would harp
Past Conditional
I would have harped
you would have harped
he/she/it would have harped
we would have harped
you would have harped
they would have harped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.harp - a chordophone that has a triangular frame consisting of a sounding board and a pillar and a curved neckharp - a chordophone that has a triangular frame consisting of a sounding board and a pillar and a curved neck; the strings stretched between the neck and the soundbox are plucked with the fingers
aeolian harp, aeolian lyre, wind harp - a harp having strings tuned in unison; they sound when wind passes over them
chordophone - a stringed instrument of the group including harps, lutes, lyres, and zithers
lyre - a harp used by ancient Greeks for accompaniment
2.harp - a pair of curved vertical supports for a lampshade
support - any device that bears the weight of another thing; "there was no place to attach supports for a shelf"
3.harp - a small rectangular free-reed instrument having a row of free reeds set back in air holes and played by blowing into the desired holeharp - a small rectangular free-reed instrument having a row of free reeds set back in air holes and played by blowing into the desired hole
free-reed instrument - a wind instrument with a free reed
Verb1.harp - come back to; "Don't dwell on the past"; "She is always harping on the same old things"
ingeminate, iterate, reiterate, repeat, restate, retell - to say, state, or perform again; "She kept reiterating her request"
2.harp - play the harp; "She harped the Saint-Saens beautifully"
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
play - perform music on (a musical instrument); "He plays the flute"; "Can you play on this old recorder?"
Translations
قِيثارقيثارَه
harfa
harpe
harppujankuttaa
harfa
hárfa
harpa
ハープ
하프
arfaarfininkaskalbėti vieną ir tą patį
arfa
harfă
harfa
harfa
harpa
พิณตั้ง
arpharp
đàn hạc

harp

[hɑːp] Narpa f
harp on VI + ADV to harp on (about)estar siempre con la misma historia (de), machacar (sobre)
stop harping on!¡no machaques!, ¡corta el rollo!

harp

[ˈhɑːrp]
nharpe f
harp on
vi
to harp on about sth → parler tout le temps de qch

harp

nHarfe f

harp

[hɑːp] narpa
harp on vi + adv (fam) to harp on (about)continuare a menarla (con)

harp

(haːp) noun
a usually large musical instrument which is held upright, and which has many strings which are plucked with the fingers.
ˈharpist noun
harp on (about)
to keep on talking about. He's forever harping on (about his low wages); She keeps harping on his faults.

harp

قِيثار harfa harpe Harfe άρπα arpa harppu harpe harfa arpa ハープ 하프 harp harpe harfa harpa арфа harpa พิณตั้ง harp đàn hạc 竖琴
References in classic literature ?
He did not know but that the day of his death was dawning in the sky; and his heart throbbed with solemn throes of joy and desire, as he thought that the wondrous all, of which he had often pondered,--the great white throne, with its ever radiant rainbow; the white-robed multitude, with voices as many waters; the crowns, the palms, the harps,--might all break upon his vision before that sun should set again.
In a gallery a band with cymbals, horns, harps, and other horrors, opened the proceedings with what seemed to be the crude first-draft or original agony of the wail known to later centuries as "In the Sweet Bye and Bye.
Then Crown'd again thir gold'n Harps they took, Harps ever tun'd, that glittering by their side Like Quivers hung, and with Praeamble sweet Of charming symphonie they introduce Thir sacred Song, and waken raptures high; No voice exempt, no voice but well could joine Melodious part, such concord is in Heav'n.
Their outward garments were adorned with the figures of suns, moons, and stars; interwoven with those of fiddles, flutes, harps, trumpets, guitars, harpsichords, and many other instruments of music, unknown to us in Europe.
When he asked capitalists for money, they replied that he might as well expect to lease jew's- harps as telephones.
But the instant the car was opposite the duke and duchess and Don Quixote the music of the clarions ceased, and then that of the lutes and harps on the car, and the figure in the robe rose up, and flinging it apart and removing the veil from its face, disclosed to their eyes the shape of Death itself, fleshless and hideous, at which sight Don Quixote felt uneasy, Sancho frightened, and the duke and duchess displayed a certain trepidation.
The drag was filled with midas-ears, harps, melames, and particularly the most beautiful hammers I have ever seen.
It is as though the Aeolian harps had caught some strayed wind from an unknown world, and brought strange messages from peopled stars.
Under his direction, Monsieur Le Quoi made some purchases, consisting of a few cloths; some groceries, with a good deal of gunpowder and tobacco; a quantity of iron-ware, among which was a large proportion of Barlow’s jack-knives, potash-kettles, and spiders; a very formidable collection of crockery of the coarsest quality and most uncouth forms; together with every other common article that the art of man has devised for his wants, not forgetting the luxuries of looking-glasses and Jew’s- harps.
A strange roseate light shone through the spaces among their trunks and the wind made in their branches the music of AEolian harps.
Then, when they had eaten and drunk as much as they could, and when the day faded and the great moon arose, all red and round, over the spires and towers of Nottingham Town, they joined hands and danced around the fires, to the music of bagpipes and harps.
The reds and creams of the background, the lyres and harps and urns and skulls, the protuberances of plaster, the fringes of scarlet plush, the sinking and blazing of innumerable electric lights, could scarcely have been surpassed for decorative effect by any craftsman of the ancient or modern world.