harrow

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Har·row

 (hăr′ō)
A borough of Greater London in southeast England. It is the site of the public school Harrow, founded in 1572.

har·row 1

 (hăr′ō)
n.
A farm implement consisting of a heavy frame with sharp teeth or upright disks, used to break up and even off plowed ground.
tr.v. har·rowed, har·row·ing, har·rows
1. To break up and level (soil or land) with a harrow.
2. To inflict great distress or torment on.

[Middle English harwe.]

har′row·er n.

har·row 2

 (hăr′ō)
tr.v. har·rowed, har·row·ing, har·rows Archaic
To plunder or rob (Hell of redeemed souls). Used of Jesus after the Crucifixion.

[Middle English herwen, variant of harien; see harry.]

harrow

(ˈhærəʊ)
n
(Agriculture) any of various implements used to level the ground, stir the soil, break up clods, destroy weeds, etc, in soil
vb
1. (Agriculture) (tr) to draw a harrow over (land)
2. (Agriculture) (intr) (of soil) to become broken up through harrowing
3. (tr) to distress; vex
[C13: of Scandinavian origin; compare Danish harv, Swedish harf; related to Middle Dutch harke rake]
ˈharrower n
ˈharrowing adj, n
ˈharrowingly adv

harrow

(ˈhærəʊ)
vb (tr)
1. to plunder or ravish
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (of Christ) to descend into (hell) to rescue righteous souls
[C13: variant of Old English hergian to harry]
ˈharrowment n

Harrow

(ˈhærəʊ)
n
(Placename) a borough of NW Greater London; site of an English boys' public school founded in 1571 at Harrow-on-the-Hill, a part of this borough. Pop: 210 700 (2003 est). Area: 51 sq km (20 sq miles)

har•row1

(ˈhær oʊ)

n.
1. an agricultural implement with spikelike teeth or upright disks, for leveling and breaking up clods in plowed land.
v.t.
2. to draw a harrow over (land).
3. to disturb keenly or painfully; distress the mind, feelings, etc., of.
v.i.
4. to become broken up by harrowing, as soil.
[1250–1300; Middle English harwe; akin to Old Norse herfi harrow, Middle Dutch harke rake]
har′row•er, n.

har•row2

(ˈhær oʊ)

v.t. Archaic.
to despoil.
[before 1000; Middle English harwen, herwen, Old English hergian to harry]
har′row•ment, n.

Har•row

(ˈhær oʊ)

n.
a borough of Greater London, in SE England. 201,300.

harrow

, harrowing - To harrow is to wound the feelings or cause to suffer—which gives us harrowing.
See also related terms for suffer.

harrow


Past participle: harrowed
Gerund: harrowing

Imperative
harrow
harrow
Present
I harrow
you harrow
he/she/it harrows
we harrow
you harrow
they harrow
Preterite
I harrowed
you harrowed
he/she/it harrowed
we harrowed
you harrowed
they harrowed
Present Continuous
I am harrowing
you are harrowing
he/she/it is harrowing
we are harrowing
you are harrowing
they are harrowing
Present Perfect
I have harrowed
you have harrowed
he/she/it has harrowed
we have harrowed
you have harrowed
they have harrowed
Past Continuous
I was harrowing
you were harrowing
he/she/it was harrowing
we were harrowing
you were harrowing
they were harrowing
Past Perfect
I had harrowed
you had harrowed
he/she/it had harrowed
we had harrowed
you had harrowed
they had harrowed
Future
I will harrow
you will harrow
he/she/it will harrow
we will harrow
you will harrow
they will harrow
Future Perfect
I will have harrowed
you will have harrowed
he/she/it will have harrowed
we will have harrowed
you will have harrowed
they will have harrowed
Future Continuous
I will be harrowing
you will be harrowing
he/she/it will be harrowing
we will be harrowing
you will be harrowing
they will be harrowing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been harrowing
you have been harrowing
he/she/it has been harrowing
we have been harrowing
you have been harrowing
they have been harrowing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been harrowing
you will have been harrowing
he/she/it will have been harrowing
we will have been harrowing
you will have been harrowing
they will have been harrowing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been harrowing
you had been harrowing
he/she/it had been harrowing
we had been harrowing
you had been harrowing
they had been harrowing
Conditional
I would harrow
you would harrow
he/she/it would harrow
we would harrow
you would harrow
they would harrow
Past Conditional
I would have harrowed
you would have harrowed
he/she/it would have harrowed
we would have harrowed
you would have harrowed
they would have harrowed

Harrow

Harrows are the primary implements used to break up dirt clods, fill in holes, and generally level the ground after it has been broken by a turning plow. One of the earlier approaches to harrowing, and one that survived on a limited scale through many centuries, was merely to drag a tree limb with plenty of branches on it over the ground. Harrows to be pulled by horses were made in five-foot wide sections, with provisions for linking them together side-by-side to make them wider. Each section was considered a load for one horse. Thus, if three sections were linked together side-by-side, three horses were used to pull the combination.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.harrow - a cultivator that pulverizes or smooths the soil
cultivator, tiller - a farm implement used to break up the surface of the soil (for aeration and weed control and conservation of moisture)
disc harrow, disk harrow - a harrow with a series of disks set on edge at an angle
Verb1.harrow - draw a harrow over (land)
farming, husbandry, agriculture - the practice of cultivating the land or raising stock
plow, plough, turn - to break and turn over earth especially with a plow; "Farmer Jones plowed his east field last week"; "turn the earth in the Spring"

harrow

verb
Archaic. To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war:
Archaic: spoil.
Translations
brány
äeshara
borona
akėčios
aanjagenangstdoenegegge
brona
grapă
brána
brana

harrow

[ˈhærəʊ] (Agr)
A. Ngrada f, rastra f
B. VT
1. (Agr) → gradar
2. (fig) → torturar, destrozar

harrow

[ˈhærəʊ] nherse f

harrow

(Agr)
nEgge f
vt
(Agr) → eggen
(fig, usu pass) to harrow somebodyjdn quälen or peinigen (geh)

harrow

[ˈhærəʊ] (Agr)
1. nerpice m
2. vterpicare
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Despite all this (consider it fair warning), the show bulges with bright art and is almost harrowingly on-topic.
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Initially, you may perceive it as slow, sluggish even, yet that impression is illusory--upon attentive listening to the recording, you will probably arrive at the same conclusion as I have: that what we hear is an infinite lyrical poem, harbouring vivid detail, refined internal structure, now and then coming across as a harrowingly poignant prayer, silent grief, the mother's pure love for her child, as well as faith: "By the Cross with thee to stay, there with thee to weep and pray, is all I ask of thee to give".
We see Lee enjoying idyllic afternoons with Joe and his son, Patrick (Ben O'Brien), sailing their rickety old boat in the Manchester harbor; Joe receiving the diagnosis of congestive heart failure that presumably drove his wife, Elise (Gretchen Mol), to hit the bottle and ultimately end their marriage; Lee playing the role of fun-loving family man to his loving but exasperated wife, Randi (Michelle Williams), and their three young children; and, in a harrowingly sad sequence, the pointless, unspeakable tragedy that drove Lee to his current life of remote solitude.
Josemaria harrowingly escaped through the Pyrenees from the red zone (where he could do no work, and his life was in constant danger) to the blue zone (where at last he could resume his activities, and he was safe).
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Why, just last month, KC Concepcion and some photographer colleagues put up a consciousness-raising and fund-generating photo exhibit on the harrowingly tragic earthquake in Nepal, so local awareness of the power of celebrity clout is palpably growing.
The Palestinians living and dying under this regime of drone-secured occupation experience suffering as at once generalised, site-specific and harrowingly material.