hassium


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has·si·um

 (hä′sē-əm)
n. Symbol Hs
An artificially produced radioactive element with atomic number 108 that has known isotopes with mass numbers ranging from 263 to 277, all of which decay by alpha particle emission or spontaneous fission. The isotope with the longest confirmed half-life (16.5 minutes) is Hs-277. See Periodic Table.

[From Medieval Latin Hassia, Hesse (German state containing Darmstadt, where the element was first synthesized).]

hassium

(ˈhæsɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a synthetic element produced in small quantities by high-energy ion bombardment. Symbol: Hs; atomic no: 108
[C20: from Latin, from Hesse, German state where it was discovered]

has·si·um

(hä′sē-əm)
Symbol Hs A synthetic, radioactive element that is produced by bombarding lead with iron ions. Its most stable isotope has a half-life of two milliseconds. Atomic number 108. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hassium - a radioactive transuranic element
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
Translations
hassium
هسيوم
хасий
hassi
hassium
Hassium
hasio
hassium
hassium
hassium
hassij
hassio
ハッシウム
하슘
hasis
hassium
hassium
has
hassiu
hassium
hasijumхасиjум
hassium
แฮลเชียม
хасiй
References in periodicals archive ?
Even its title is appropriately ectoplasmic, and could reference the Holy Spirit, or a tongue-in-cheek variation bearing the same first word; or, as I found when I looked through the periodic table of elements and discovered Hs as the symbol for Hassium, a silvery substance only produced a few times through nuclear reaction in tiny, almost unobservable quantities, with an incredibly short life.
Access versions are finished in Hassium cloth, Ambiance in Osmium cloth and Laureate in Rhodium cloth with Duster lettering.
For the first time, researchers have studied the chemistry of the element hassium, confirming its location on the periodic table.