hatchway

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hatch·way

 (hăch′wā′)
n.
1. A passage or opening leading to a hold, compartment, or cellar.
2. A ladder or stairway within a hatchway.

hatchway

(ˈhætʃˌweɪ)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) an opening in the deck of a vessel to provide access below
2. (Architecture) a similar opening in a wall, floor, ceiling, or roof, usually fitted with a lid or door
Often shortened to: hatch

hatch1

(hætʃ)

v.t.
1. to cause young to emerge from (the egg), as by brooding or incubating.
2. to bring forth or produce; devise; plot.
v.i.
3. to be hatched.
4. to brood.
n.
5. the act of hatching.
6. something that is hatched, as a brood.
[1200–50; Middle English hacchen; akin to Middle High German hecken to hatch]
hatch′a•ble, adj.
hatch`a•bil′i•ty, n.
hatch′er, n.

hatch2

(hætʃ)

n.
1.
a. Also called hatchway. an opening in the deck of a vessel or in the floor or roof of a building, used as a passageway.
b. the cover over such an opening.
2. an opening or door in an aircraft.
3. the lower half of a divided door.
4. a small door, grated opening, or serving counter in or attached to a wall.
Idioms:
down the hatch, (used as a toast.)
[before 1100; Middle English hacche, Old English hæcc grating, hatch, half-gate; akin to Middle Dutch hecke gate, railing]

hatch3

(hætʃ)

v.t.
1. to mark with lines, esp. closely set parallel lines, as for shading in drawing or engraving.
n.
2. a shading line in drawing or engraving.
[1470–80; earlier hache < Middle French hacher to cut up, derivative of hache ax. See hatchet]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hatchway - an entrance equipped with a hatchhatchway - an entrance equipped with a hatch; especially a passageway between decks of a ship
entrance, entranceway, entryway, entree, entry - something that provides access (to get in or get out); "they waited at the entrance to the garden"; "beggars waited just outside the entryway to the cathedral"
escape hatch - hatchway that provides a means of escape in an emergency
hatch - a movable barrier covering a hatchway
Translations
فتْحَة في سَطْح السَّفينَه
palubní jícen
luge
lejáró
lestarop, lúgugat
palubný otvor
ambar ağzı kapağı

hatchway

[ˈhætʃweɪ] n [ship] → écoutille f

hatch1

(hӕtʃ) noun
(the door or cover of) an opening in a wall, floor, ship's deck etc. There are two hatches between the kitchen and dining-room for serving food.
ˈhatchway noun
an opening, especially in a ship's deck.
References in classic literature ?
Every once and a while Peleg came hobbling out of his whalebone den, roaring at the men down the hatchways, roaring up to the riggers at the mast-head, and then concluded by roaring back into his wigwam.
He followed cautiously, but when he got to bows found no one, and the hatchways were all closed.
Her cargo is not stowed in any sense; it is simply dumped into her through six hatchways, more or less, by twelve winches or so, with clatter and hurry and racket and heat, in a cloud of steam and a mess of coal-dust.
Where did’ee ever fall in with a regular built vessel, with starn-post and cutwater, gar board-streak and plank- shear, gangways, and hatchways, and waterways, quarter-deck, and forecastle, ay, and flush-deck?
For days they suffered the doleful rigors and retchings of sea-sickness, lurking below in their berths in squalid state, or emerging now and then like spectres from the hatchways, in capotes and blankets, with dirty nightcaps, grizzly beard, lantern visage and unhappy eye, shivering about the deck, and ever and anon crawling to the sides of the vessel, and offering up their tributes to the windward, to infinite annoyance of the captain.
Pacing back and forth the length of the hatchways and savagely chewing the end of a cigar, was the man whose casual glance had rescued me from the sea.
On the flanks it is cased with wood, and at top completely covered by a large, sloping, battened hatchway.
Among the great beams, bulks, and ringbolts of the ship, and the emigrant-berths, and chests, and bundles, and barrels, and heaps of miscellaneous baggage -'lighted up, here and there, by dangling lanterns; and elsewhere by the yellow daylight straying down a windsail or a hatchway - were crowded groups of people, making new friendships, taking leave of one another, talking, laughing, crying, eating and drinking; some, already settled down into the possession of their few feet of space, with their little households arranged, and tiny children established on stools, or in dwarf elbow-chairs; others, despairing of a resting-place, and wandering disconsolately.
He was standing on the ladder with his back to us, peering over the combing of the hatchway.
cried D'Artagnan, as he went down the steps of the hatchway, preceded by the lantern, "what a number of barrels
Disko in the cabin growled up the hatchway, and they could hear him suck his pencil.
Come," he said, and we followed him through the hatchway which had been opened by one of the seamen.