hate crime


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Related to hate crime: terrorism

hate crime

n.
A crime motivated by prejudice against a social group: "[His]murders were hate crimes targeting victims by gender" (Jane Caputi and Diana E.H. Russell).

hate crime

n
(Law) a crime, esp of violence, in which the victim is targeted because of his or her race, religion, sexuality, etc
References in periodicals archive ?
Staff will be trained in diversity issues, what constitutes hate crime, the relevant law and the processes required to report it.
The Local Law Enforcement Hate Crimes Prevention Act would provide federal resources and assistance to local police when a hate crime based on sexual orientation or gender identity occurs.
In the context of hate crime, I do have some regrets that we have a constitutional prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment," lamented Young--the Canadian Alan Dershowitz--in a March 28 Toronto Star column.
Due to their visibility and appearance, Sikh Americans were proportionately singled out for harassment more than any other ethnic or religious group in the country during the hate crime epidemic.
When a community reacts to a hate crime, skinheads perceive that reaction as aggressive, which reinforces the notion that skinheads must defend themselves against a common enemy.
In Hate Crime, former CBS Radio reporter Joyce King meticulously maps out the whole gruesome tale, from that fateful night to the investigation to the media maelstrom that turned Jasper (pop.
The material in this training guide is intended to assist law enforcement agencies in establishing a hate crime training program for their personnel.
There is no adequate federal standard of what constitutes a hate crime, and nothing could make plainer the need for one than the way young Matthew Shepard died in Wyoming in October 1998.
Hate crime laws provide increased penalties for those who commit crimes based on bias against race, religion, ethnicity, disability, national origin, gender or sexual orientation.
In the wake of the brutal October 1998 murder-robbery of University of Wyoming student Matthew Shepard, the news media, liberal gay rights groups, politicians, and others engaged in a national outcry for swift enactment of hate crime legislation.
The death of gay college student Matthew Shepard, who in October was kidnapped, pistol-whipped and left tied to a fence for 18 hours in near-freezing temperatures in Wyoming, has prompted calls from around the nation for tougher hate crime legislation that would include protection for homosexuals.
The authors assert that ambiguities in the various definitions of a "hate crime" undermine consistency in the compilations of hate crime statistics.