haul off


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haul

 (hôl)
v. hauled, haul·ing, hauls
v.tr.
1. To pull or drag forcibly: hauled the boat onto the beach. See Synonyms at pull.
2. To transport, as with a truck or cart: hauling cars across the country.
3.
a. To cause (oneself) to move, especially slowly or laboriously: hauled myself down to the lobby.
b. To compel to go, especially for trial: hauled their competitor into court.
4. Nautical To change the course of (a ship), especially in order to sail closer into the wind.
v.intr.
1. To pull or drag something forcibly.
2. To provide transportation; cart.
3. To shift direction: The wind hauled to the east.
4. Nautical To change the course of a ship.
n.
1. The act of pulling or dragging.
2. The act of transporting or carting.
3. A distance, especially the distance over which something is pulled or transported.
4.
a. Something that is pulled or transported; a load.
b. Everything collected or acquired at a single time; the take: a big haul of fish.
Phrasal Verbs:
haul off Informal
1. To draw back slightly, as in preparation for initiating an action: "hauled off and smacked the hapless aide across the face" (Bill Barol).
2. To withdraw or move to another place.
haul out
To move from water onto the shore: a beach where seals often haul out; canoeists who hauled out on the riverbank to rest.
haul up
To come to a halt.
Idiom:
haul ass Vulgar Slang
To move quickly: We'll be late if you don't haul ass.

[Middle English haulen, from Old French haler, of Germanic origin; see kelə- in Indo-European roots.]

haul′er n.

haul off

vb (intr, adverb)
1. (foll by and) informal US and Canadian to draw back in preparation (esp to strike or fight): I hauled off and slugged him.
2. (Nautical Terms) nautical to alter the course of a vessel so as to avoid an obstruction, shallow waters, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.haul off - take away by means of a vehicle; "They carted off the old furniture"
take away, take out - take out or remove; "take out the chicken after adding the vegetables"
Translations

w>haul off

vi (Naut) → (ab)drehen, den Kurs ändern
References in classic literature ?
They lock themselves together and chew each other's jaws for a while; then they roll and tumble on the ground till one loses a horn or a leg and has to haul off for repairs.
The fisherman found the haul off Yarmouth, the Isle of Wight, on Sunday morning.
RAFA BENITEZ has defended his decision to haul off Fernando Torres in yesterday's draw against Birmingham City.