having


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have

 (hăv)
v. had (hăd), hav·ing, has (hăz)
v.tr.
1.
a. To be in possession of: already had a car.
b. To possess as a characteristic, quality, or function: has a beard; had a great deal of energy.
c. To possess or contain as a constituent part: a car that has air bags.
2. To occupy a particular relation to: had many disciples.
3. To possess knowledge of or facility in: has very little Spanish.
4. To hold in the mind; entertain: had doubts about their loyalty.
5. To use or exhibit in action: have compassion.
6.
a. To come into possession of; acquire: Not one copy of the book was to be had in the entire town.
b. To receive; get: I had a letter from my cousin.
c. To accept; take: I'll have the peas instead of the spinach.
7.
a. To suffer from: have defective vision.
b. To be subject to the experience of: had a difficult time last winter.
8.
a. To cause to do something, as by persuasion or compulsion: had my assistant run the errand.
b. To cause to be in a specified place or state: had the guests in the dining room; had everyone fascinated.
9. To permit; allow: I won't have that kind of behavior in my house.
10. To carry on, perform, or execute: have an argument.
11.
a. To place at a disadvantage: Your opponent in the debate had you on every issue.
b. Informal To get the better of, especially by trickery or deception: They realized too late that they'd been had by a swindler.
c. Informal To influence by dishonest means; bribe: an incorruptible official who could not be had.
12.
a. To procreate (offspring): wanted to have a child.
b. To give birth to; bear: She's going to have a baby.
13. To partake of: have lunch.
14. To be obliged to; must: We simply have to get there on time.
15. To engage in sexual intercourse with.
v.aux.
Used with a past participle to form the present perfect, past perfect, and future perfect tenses indicating completed action: The troublemaker has gone for good. I regretted that I had lost my temper. They will have finished by the time we arrive.
n.
One enjoying especially material wealth: "The gulf widens between the feast of the haves and the famine of the have-nots" (Salman Rushdie).
Phrasal Verbs:
have at
To attack.
have on
1. To wear: had on red shoes.
2. To be scheduled: We have a dinner party on for Friday.
Idioms:
have a mind to
To be inclined to (do something).
had better/best Usage Problem
To be wise or obliged to; should or must: He had better do what he is told. You had best bring a raincoat in this weather.
have done with
To stop; cease: Have done with your quibbling!
have had it Informal
1. To have endured all that one can: I've had it with their delays.
2. To be in a state beyond remedy, repair, or salvage: That coat has had it.
3. To have done everything that is possible or that will be permitted.
have in mind
1. To remember or think of: She has your best interests in mind.
2. To intend or be inclined (to do something): I have in mind to sell the house.
have it
1. To assert; maintain: Rumor has it that he quit.
2. To think and act with respect to (something being considered): Have it your way.
3. To gain a victory in a voice vote: The ayes have it.
have/have got it all over
To be much better than (someone) at a particular endeavor.
have/have got it in for
To act in a hostile manner toward or intend to harm (someone), especially because of a grudge.
have/have got it in (one)
To have the capacity or disposition to (to do something).
have it out
To settle decisively, especially by means of an argument or a discussion.
have/have got nothing on (someone)
1. To fail to be equal or superior to (someone) in a particular way.
2. To know or be able to prove information regarding (someone).
have (something) coming
To deserve what one receives: You had that reprimand coming for a very long time.
have/have got (someone's) back
To protect or shield someone from harm, loss, or danger.
have to do with
To be concerned or associated with.

[Middle English haven, from Old English habban; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: The idioms had better and had best resemble an auxiliary verb in that their form never changes to show person or tense and that they cannot follow another verb in a phrase. In informal speech, people tend to omit had, especially with had better, as in You better clean up your room! In formal contexts and in writing, however, had should be kept either in full or as a contraction: We had better revise the proposal or We'd better revise the proposal. See Usage Note at rather.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Sophia was much pleased with the beauty of the girl, whom she pitied for her simplicity in having dressed herself in that manner, as she saw the envy which it had occasioned among her equals.
David Stuart, one of the partners, proceeded with his men to the post already established by him at the mouth of the Oakinagan; having furnished this with goods and ammunition, he proceeded three hundred miles up that river, where he established another post in a good trading neighborhood.
Wardle invited the full circle to dinner at the Adelphi; and the decanters having been thrice sent round, opened the business.
In this vessel, after a long voyage, I arrived in England the 11th of June, in the year 1687, having been thirty-five years absent.
However, having an infirmity - for I am hard of hearing, sir--"
Whilst the burghers of the Hague were tearing in pieces the bodies of John and Cornelius de Witt, and whilst William of Orange, after having made sure that his two antagonists were really dead, was galloping over the Leyden road, followed by Captain van Deken, whom he found a little too compassionate to honour him any longer with his confidence, Craeke, the faithful servant, mounted on a good horse, and little suspecting what terrible events had taken place since his departure, proceeded along the high road lined with trees, until he was clear of the town and the neighbouring villages.
It was Sir Edward, who informed by Augusta of her Brother's marriage, came doubtless to reproach him for having dared to unite himself to me without his Knowledge.
We stayed, however, in this place from the latter end of July to the beginning of September, when having provided ourselves with other vessels, we set out for Cochim, and landed there after a very hazardous and difficult passage, made so partly by the currents and storms which separated us from each other, and partly by continual apprehensions of the English and Dutch, who were cruising for us in the Indian seas.
The Antisseans also, having taken in those who were banished from Chios, afterwards did the same thing; and also the Zancleans, after having taken in the people of Samos.
Boris Drubetskoy, having left his wife in Moscow and being for the present en garcon (as he phrased it), was also there and, though not an aide-de-camp, had subscribed a large sum toward the expenses.
The bees, however, did not suffer this to happen, and they stopped their excavations in due time; so that the basins, as soon as they had been a little deepened, came to have flat bottoms; and these flat bottoms, formed by thin little plates of the vermilion wax having been left ungnawed, were situated, as far as the eye could judge, exactly along the planes of imaginary intersection between the basins on the opposite sides of the ridge of wax.
But in maintaining armed men there in place of colonies one spends much more, having to consume on the garrison all the income from the state, so that the acquisition turns into a loss, and many more are exasperated, because the whole state is injured; through the shifting of the garrison up and down all become acquainted with hardship, and all become hostile, and they are enemies who, whilst beaten on their own ground, are yet able to do hurt.