hawk


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hawk 1

 (hôk)
n.
1. Any of various birds of prey, especially of the genera Accipiter and Buteo in the family Accipitridae, characteristically having a short hooked bill and strong claws used for seizing.
2. Any of various similar birds of prey.
3. A person who preys on others; a shark.
4.
a. One who demonstrates an actively aggressive or combative attitude, as in an argument.
b. A person who favors military force or action in order to carry out foreign policy.
intr.v. hawked, hawk·ing, hawks
1. To hunt with trained hawks.
2. To swoop and strike in the manner of a hawk: "It was fun to watch the scattered snail kites ... lifting and falling in the wind as they hawked across the shining grass and water" (Peter Matthiessen).

[Middle English hauk, from Old English hafoc; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

hawk′ish adj.
hawk′ish·ly adv.
hawk′ish·ness n.

hawk 2

 (hôk)
v. hawked, hawk·ing, hawks
v.intr.
To peddle goods aggressively, especially by calling out.
v.tr.
To peddle (goods) aggressively, especially by calling out.

[Middle English hauken, back-formation from hauker; see hawker.]

hawk 3

 (hôk)
v. hawked, hawk·ing, hawks
v.intr.
To clear or attempt to clear the throat by or as if by coughing up phlegm.
v.tr.
To clear the throat of (phlegm).
n.
An audible effort to clear the throat by expelling phlegm.

[Imitative.]

hawk

(hɔːk)
n
1. (Animals) any of various diurnal birds of prey of the family Accipitridae, such as the goshawk and Cooper's hawk, typically having short rounded wings and a long tail.
2. (Animals) US and Canadian any of various other falconiform birds, including the falcons but not the eagles or vultures
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who advocates or supports war or warlike policies. Compare dove12
4. a ruthless or rapacious person
5. know a hawk from a handsaw to be able to judge things; be discerning
vb
6. (Falconry) (intr) to hunt with falcons, hawks, etc
7. (Falconry) (intr) (of falcons or hawks) to fly in quest of prey
8. to pursue or attack on the wing, as a hawk
[from Shakespeare (Hamlet II:2:375); handsaw is probably a corruption of dialect heronshaw heron]
[Old English hafoc; related to Old Norse haukr, Old Frisian havek, Old High German habuh, Polish kobuz]
ˈhawkˌlike adj

hawk

(hɔːk)
vb
1. to offer (goods) for sale, as in the street
2. (often foll by: about) to spread (news, gossip, etc)

hawk

(hɔːk)
vb
1. (intr) to clear the throat noisily
2. (tr) to force (phlegm) up from the throat
3. Brit a slang word for spit1
n
a noisy clearing of the throat
[C16: of imitative origin; see haw2]

hawk

(hɔːk)
n
(Building) a small square board with a handle underneath, used for carrying wet plaster or mortar. Also called: mortar board
[of unknown origin]

hawk1

(hɔk)
n.
1. any of various birds of prey of the family Accipitridae, having a short, hooked beak, broad wings, and curved talons.
2. any of various other birds of prey, as falcons, or similar, unrelated birds, as nighthawks.
3. a person who preys on others, as a sharper.
4. a person, esp. one in public office, who advocates war or a belligerent national attitude.
5. to hunt on the wing like a hawk.
6. to hunt using trained hawks.
v.t.
7. to pursue or catch on the wing: a bird that hawks insects.

v.i.
[before 900; Middle English hauk(e), Old English hafoc, c. Old Frisian havek, Old Saxon habuc, Old High German habuh, Old Norse haukr]
hawk′like`, adj.

hawk2

(hɔk)

v.t.
to peddle or offer for sale, esp. by calling aloud in public.
[1470–80; back formation from hawker2]

hawk3

(hɔk)

v.i.
1. to make an effort to raise phlegm from the throat; clear the throat noisily.
v.t.
2. to raise by hawking: to hawk phlegm up.
n.
3. a noisy effort to clear the throat.
[1575–85; imitative; see haw1]

hawk

(hôk)
Any of various birds of prey having a short hooked bill, broad wings, and strong claws for seizing prey. Hawks are usually smaller than eagles and larger than falcons.

hawk


Past participle: hawked
Gerund: hawking

Imperative
hawk
hawk
Present
I hawk
you hawk
he/she/it hawks
we hawk
you hawk
they hawk
Preterite
I hawked
you hawked
he/she/it hawked
we hawked
you hawked
they hawked
Present Continuous
I am hawking
you are hawking
he/she/it is hawking
we are hawking
you are hawking
they are hawking
Present Perfect
I have hawked
you have hawked
he/she/it has hawked
we have hawked
you have hawked
they have hawked
Past Continuous
I was hawking
you were hawking
he/she/it was hawking
we were hawking
you were hawking
they were hawking
Past Perfect
I had hawked
you had hawked
he/she/it had hawked
we had hawked
you had hawked
they had hawked
Future
I will hawk
you will hawk
he/she/it will hawk
we will hawk
you will hawk
they will hawk
Future Perfect
I will have hawked
you will have hawked
he/she/it will have hawked
we will have hawked
you will have hawked
they will have hawked
Future Continuous
I will be hawking
you will be hawking
he/she/it will be hawking
we will be hawking
you will be hawking
they will be hawking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been hawking
you have been hawking
he/she/it has been hawking
we have been hawking
you have been hawking
they have been hawking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been hawking
you will have been hawking
he/she/it will have been hawking
we will have been hawking
you will have been hawking
they will have been hawking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been hawking
you had been hawking
he/she/it had been hawking
we had been hawking
you had been hawking
they had been hawking
Conditional
I would hawk
you would hawk
he/she/it would hawk
we would hawk
you would hawk
they would hawk
Past Conditional
I would have hawked
you would have hawked
he/she/it would have hawked
we would have hawked
you would have hawked
they would have hawked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hawk - diurnal bird of prey typically having short rounded wings and a long tailhawk - diurnal bird of prey typically having short rounded wings and a long tail
bird of prey, raptor, raptorial bird - any of numerous carnivorous birds that hunt and kill other animals
Accipitridae, family Accipitridae - hawks; Old World vultures; kites; harriers; eagles
eyas - an unfledged or nestling hawk
tercel, tercelet, tiercel - male hawk especially male peregrine or gyrfalcon
Accipiter gentilis, goshawk - large hawk of Eurasia and North America used in falconry
Accipiter nisus, sparrow hawk - small hawk of Eurasia and northern Africa
Accipiter cooperii, blue darter, Cooper's hawk - bluish-grey North American hawk having a darting flight
chicken hawk, hen hawk - nontechnical term for any hawks said to prey on poultry
buteonine - any hawk of the genus Buteo
Buteo jamaicensis, redtail, red-tailed hawk - dark brown American hawk species having a reddish-brown tail
Buteo lagopus, roughleg, rough-legged hawk - large hawk of the northern hemisphere that feeds chiefly on small rodents and is beneficial to farmers
Buteo lineatus, red-shouldered hawk - North American hawk with reddish brown shoulders
Buteo buteo, buzzard - the common European short-winged hawk
honey buzzard, Pernis apivorus - Old World hawk that feeds on bee larvae and small rodents and reptiles
kite - any of several small graceful hawks of the family Accipitridae having long pointed wings and feeding on insects and small animals
harrier - hawks that hunt over meadows and marshes and prey on small terrestrial animals
harrier eagle, short-toed eagle - any of numerous large Old World hawks intermediate in some respects between typical hawks and typical eagles
falcon - diurnal birds of prey having long pointed powerful wings adapted for swift flight
fish eagle, fish hawk, osprey, Pandion haliaetus, sea eagle - large harmless hawk found worldwide that feeds on fish and builds a bulky nest often occupied for years
2.hawk - an advocate of an aggressive policy on foreign relations
militarist, warmonger - a person who advocates war or warlike policies
peacenik, dove - someone who prefers negotiations to armed conflict in the conduct of foreign relations
3.hawk - a square board with a handle underneath; used by masons to hold or carry mortar
board - a flat piece of material designed for a special purpose; "he nailed boards across the windows"
Verb1.hawk - sell or offer for sale from place to placehawk - sell or offer for sale from place to place
sell, trade, deal - do business; offer for sale as for one's livelihood; "She deals in gold"; "The brothers sell shoes"
2.hawk - hunt with hawks; "the tribes like to hawk in the desert"
hunt, hunt down, track down, run - pursue for food or sport (as of wild animals); "Goering often hunted wild boars in Poland"; "The dogs are running deer"; "The Duke hunted in these woods"
3.hawk - clear mucus or food from one's throat; "he cleared his throat before he started to speak"
cough - exhale abruptly, as when one has a chest cold or congestion; "The smoker coughs all day"

hawk

1 noun
Related words
adjective accipitrine
collective noun cast

hawk

2
verb peddle, market, sell, push, traffic, tout (informal), vend vendors hawking trinkets

hawk

verb
To travel about selling goods:
Translations
صَقْريُنادي على بضاعَتِه
jestřábkrahujecprovozovat podomní obchod
drive gadehandelhøg
haukka
jastreb
héja
haukurbjóîa vöru til sölu
タカ
vanagas
tirgot/piedāvāt preces pa mājāmvanags
dravý vták
jastrebsokol
jastrebјастреб
hök
atmacadoğanşahinseyyar satıcılık yapmak
яструб

hawk

1 [hɔːk] N (Orn, Pol) → halcón m
he was watching me like a hawkme vigilaba estrechamente, no me quitaba ojo

hawk

2 [hɔːk] VT [+ goods for sale] → pregonar

hawk

3 [hɔːk] VI (also hawk up) (= clear one's throat) → carraspear

hawk

[ˈhɔːk]
n
(= bird) → faucon m
to watch sb like a hawk (= very closely) → surveiller qn de près
(= person) → faucon m
hawks and doves → faucons et colombes
vt (= offer for sale) [+ goods] → colporter; [+ property] → vendre

hawk

1
n
(Orn) → Habicht m; (= sparrow hawk)Sperber m; (= falcon)Falke m; to watch somebody like a hawkjdn ganz genau beobachten
(fig: = politician) → Falke m; the hawks and the dovesdie Falken und die Tauben
vimit Falken jagen

hawk

2
vi (with phlegm) → sich räuspern

hawk

3
vthausieren (gehen) mit; (in street) → verkaufen, feilhalten, feilbieten; (by shouting out) → ausschreien

hawk

1 [hɔːk] n (also) (fig) → falco

hawk

2 [hɔːk] vt (goods for sale) → vendere per strada

hawk1

(hoːk) noun
a type of bird of prey.
ˈhawk-ˈeyed adjective
having very good eye-sight.

hawk2

(hoːk) verb
to carry goods round for sale.
ˈhawker noun

hawk

vt to — up (fam) expectorar (flemas)
References in classic literature ?
They can't any of them speak English, except one little girl, and all she can say is "We go Black Hawk, Nebraska.
But already the sable wing was before the old man's eyes; the long hooked bill at his head: with a scream, the black hawk darted away with his prize.
The sun sets on some retired meadow, where no house is visible, with all the glory and splendor that it lavishes on cities, and perchance as it has never set before--where there is but a solitary marsh hawk to have his wings gilded by it, or only a musquash looks out from his cabin, and there is some little black-veined brook in the midst of the marsh, just beginning to meander, winding slowly round a decaying stump.
The masterly horsemanship of the Disinherited Knight, and the activity of the noble animal which he mounted, enabled him for a few minutes to keep at sword's point his three antagonists, turning and wheeling with the agility of a hawk upon the wing, keeping his enemies as far separate as he could, and rushing now against the one, now against the other, dealing sweeping blows with his sword, without waiting to receive those which were aimed at him in return.
So a big pigeon pie was brought in and put on a sidetable, and I made a hearty supper, for I was as hungry as a hawk, while Mr.
Matkah taught him to follow the cod and the halibut along the under-sea banks and wrench the rockling out of his hole among the weeds; how to skirt the wrecks lying a hundred fathoms below water and dart like a rifle bullet in at one porthole and out at another as the fishes ran; how to dance on the top of the waves when the lightning was racing all over the sky, and wave his flipper politely to the stumpy-tailed Albatross and the Man-of-war Hawk as they went down the wind; how to jump three or four feet clear of the water like a dolphin, flippers close to the side and tail curved; to leave the flying fish alone because they are all bony; to take the shoulder-piece out of a cod at full speed ten fathoms deep, and never to stop and look at a boat or a ship, but particularly a row-boat.
There was once upon a time a witch, who in the shape of a hawk used every night to break the windows of a certain village church.
On her left hand she bore a hawk, a proof to Don Quixote's mind that she must be some great lady and the mistress of the whole hunting party, which was the fact; so he said to Sancho, "Run Sancho, my son, and say to that lady on the palfrey with the hawk that I, the Knight of the Lions, kiss the hands of her exalted beauty, and if her excellence will grant me leave I will go and kiss them in person and place myself at her service for aught that may be in my power and her highness may command; and mind, Sancho, how thou speakest, and take care not to thrust in any of thy proverbs into thy message.
There might be treachery lurking beneath their fair appearance; but none who knew The Hawk would be so gullible as to hope to trap him thus.
The recent hoverings of the Blackfeet about the camp, their nightly prowls and daring and successful marauds, had kept him in a fever and a flutter, like a hawk in a cage who hears his late companions swooping and screaming in wild liberty above him.
I can only say that he looked like a hawk and she like a dove--and, now that I think of it, that is what they each did look like; and do look like in their normal condition.
A hawk, driving down out of the blue, had barely missed him.