hawkish


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hawk 1

 (hôk)
n.
1. Any of various birds of prey, especially of the genera Accipiter and Buteo in the family Accipitridae, characteristically having a short hooked bill and strong claws used for seizing.
2. Any of various similar birds of prey.
3. A person who preys on others; a shark.
4.
a. One who demonstrates an actively aggressive or combative attitude, as in an argument.
b. A person who favors military force or action in order to carry out foreign policy.
intr.v. hawked, hawk·ing, hawks
1. To hunt with trained hawks.
2. To swoop and strike in the manner of a hawk: "It was fun to watch the scattered snail kites ... lifting and falling in the wind as they hawked across the shining grass and water" (Peter Matthiessen).

[Middle English hauk, from Old English hafoc; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

hawk′ish adj.
hawk′ish·ly adv.
hawk′ish·ness n.

hawk 2

 (hôk)
v. hawked, hawk·ing, hawks
v.intr.
To peddle goods aggressively, especially by calling out.
v.tr.
To peddle (goods) aggressively, especially by calling out.

[Middle English hauken, back-formation from hauker; see hawker.]

hawk 3

 (hôk)
v. hawked, hawk·ing, hawks
v.intr.
To clear or attempt to clear the throat by or as if by coughing up phlegm.
v.tr.
To clear the throat of (phlegm).
n.
An audible effort to clear the throat by expelling phlegm.

[Imitative.]

hawkish

(ˈhɔːkɪʃ)
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) favouring the use or display of force rather than diplomacy to achieve foreign policy goals

hawk•ish

(ˈhɔ kɪʃ)

adj.
1. resembling a hawk, as in appearance or behavior.
2. advocating war or a belligerently threatening diplomatic policy.
[1835–45]
hawk′ish•ly, adv.
hawk′ish•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.hawkish - disposed to warfare or hard-line policies; "militant nations"; "hawkish congressman"; "warlike policies"
unpeaceful - not peaceful; "unpeaceful times"; "an unpeaceful marriage"
Translations

hawkish

[ˈhɔːkɪʃ] ADJ (Pol) → de línea dura

hawkish

[ˈhɔːkɪʃ] adjbelliciste

hawkish

[ˈhɔːkɪʃ] adj (politician) → che sostiene la linea dura
References in periodicals archive ?
s North Korea policy may get tougher following President Donald Trump's sacking of dovish Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and replacing him with the hawkish CIA Director Mike Pompeo.
Iran played down the potential impact on its landmark 2015 nuclear deal with worldpowers of the appointment of the hawkish Mike Pompeo as the new US secretary of state, saying the change was an internal US matter.
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49% as the policy was far less hawkish than expected.
However, the hawkish approach towards Iran nuclear deal and threats of using nuclear weapons against North Korea, it was only natural to see a report of this kind.
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INDIAN army chief Gen Bipin Rawat has once again stirred controversy with hawkish and arguably reckless comments against Pakistan.
The hawkish Narendra Modi government is, perhaps, emboldened by the support it is getting from the equally hawkish Trump administration in Washington to press Pakistan to succumb to its (New Delhi's) diktat, which Islamabad has rightly rejected.
The Nyanza counties of Homa Bay and Siaya have three top hawkish defectors who are also eyeing appointments as Cabinet Secretaries.
US stocks slipped from their all-time highs on Thursday, weighed down by Apple and the hawkish stance of the Federal Reserve, which hinted at raising interest rates for a third time this year despite low inflation.
Overall, yields trended downwards for most of the quarter, jumping up twice throughout: once in mid-May on the back of strong economic data, and again towards quarter's end on hawkish remarks from global central banks (ECB, BOE, BOC).