hay


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hay

 (hā)
n.
1. Grass or other plants, such as clover or alfalfa, cut and dried for fodder.
2. Slang A trifling amount of money: gets $100 an hour, which isn't hay.
v. hayed, hay·ing, hays
v.intr.
To mow and cure grass and herbage for hay.
v.tr.
1. To make hay on (a patch of land).
2. To make (grass or other plants) into hay.
3. To feed with hay.

[Middle English, from Old English hīeg; see kau- in Indo-European roots.]

hay′er n.

hay

(heɪ)
n
1. (Agriculture)
a. grass, clover, etc, cut and dried as fodder
b. (in combination): a hayfield; a hayloft.
2. hit the hay slang to go to bed
3. make hay of to throw into confusion
4. make hay while the sun shines to take full advantage of an opportunity
5. roll in the hay informal sexual intercourse or heavy petting
vb
6. (Agriculture) to cut, dry, and store (grass, clover, etc) as fodder
7. (Agriculture) (tr) to feed with hay
[Old English hieg; related to Old Norse hey, Gothic hawi, Old Frisian hē, Old High German houwi; see hew]

hay

(heɪ) or

hey

n
1. (Dancing) a circular figure in country dancing
2. (Dancing) a former country dance in which the dancers wove in and out of a circle
[C16: of uncertain origin]

Hay

(heɪ)
n
(Biography) Will. 1888–1949, British music-hall comedian, who later starred in films, such as Oh, Mr Porter! (1937)

hay

(heɪ)

n.
1. herbage, as grass, clover, or alfalfa, cut and dried for use as forage.
2. Slang.
a. a small sum of money.
b. money.
3. Slang. marijuana.
v.t.
4. to convert (plant material) into hay.
5. to feed with hay.
v.i.
6. to cut grass, clover, or the like, and store for use as forage.
Idioms:
make hay, to avail oneself of an opportunity.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English hēg, c. Old Saxon hōi, Old High German hewi, houwi, Old Norse hey, Gothic hawi; akin to hew]
hay′ey, adj.

Hay

(heɪ)

n. John Milton,
1838–1905, U.S. statesman and author.

hay


Past participle: hayed
Gerund: haying

Imperative
hay
hay
Present
I hay
you hay
he/she/it hays
we hay
you hay
they hay
Preterite
I hayed
you hayed
he/she/it hayed
we hayed
you hayed
they hayed
Present Continuous
I am haying
you are haying
he/she/it is haying
we are haying
you are haying
they are haying
Present Perfect
I have hayed
you have hayed
he/she/it has hayed
we have hayed
you have hayed
they have hayed
Past Continuous
I was haying
you were haying
he/she/it was haying
we were haying
you were haying
they were haying
Past Perfect
I had hayed
you had hayed
he/she/it had hayed
we had hayed
you had hayed
they had hayed
Future
I will hay
you will hay
he/she/it will hay
we will hay
you will hay
they will hay
Future Perfect
I will have hayed
you will have hayed
he/she/it will have hayed
we will have hayed
you will have hayed
they will have hayed
Future Continuous
I will be haying
you will be haying
he/she/it will be haying
we will be haying
you will be haying
they will be haying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been haying
you have been haying
he/she/it has been haying
we have been haying
you have been haying
they have been haying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been haying
you will have been haying
he/she/it will have been haying
we will have been haying
you will have been haying
they will have been haying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been haying
you had been haying
he/she/it had been haying
we had been haying
you had been haying
they had been haying
Conditional
I would hay
you would hay
he/she/it would hay
we would hay
you would hay
they would hay
Past Conditional
I would have hayed
you would have hayed
he/she/it would have hayed
we would have hayed
you would have hayed
they would have hayed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hay - grass mowed and cured for use as fodderhay - grass mowed and cured for use as fodder
fodder - coarse food (especially for livestock) composed of entire plants or the leaves and stalks of a cereal crop
timothy - a grass grown for hay
haymow - a mass of hay piled up in a barn for preservation
Verb1.hay - convert (plant material) into hay
convert - change the nature, purpose, or function of something; "convert lead into gold"; "convert hotels into jails"; "convert slaves to laborers"

hay

noun straw, fodder, forage, silage, pasturage bales of hay
Translations
تِبْـنحَشيش، قَش
сено
seno
fojno
hein
heinä
sijeno
széna
hey
干し草
건초
faenum
šienasšienligėšieno kupetašieno stirtaiškleręs
siensgulta
fân
seno
seno
หญ้าแห้ง
samankuru ot
cỏ khô

hay

[heɪ]
A. Nheno m
that ain't hay (US) → eso no es moco de pavo
to hit the hayacostarse
to make hay while the sun shinesaprovecharse la ocasión
B. CPD hay fever Nfiebre f del heno, alergia f al polen

hay

[ˈheɪ] nfoin m
to make hay, to make hay while the sun shines → saisir l'occasionhay bale nballe f de foinhay fever nrhume m des foins
to get hay fever (= suffer from) → être sujet(te) au rhume des foins
Do you get hay fever? → Est-ce que vous êtes sujet au rhume des foins?

hay

nHeu nt; to make hayHeu machen, heuen; (fig)profitieren; to hit the hay (inf)sich aufs Ohr hauen (inf); to make hay while the sun shines (Prov) → das Eisen schmieden, solange es heiß ist (Prov)

hay

:
haycock
nHeuhaufen m
hay fever
nHeuschnupfen m
hayfork
nHeugabel f; (motor-driven) → Heuwender m
hayloft
nHeuboden m
haymaker
n
Heumacher(in) m(f)
(Boxing inf) → knallharter Schlag, Schwinger m
haymaking
nHeuen nt, → Heuernte f
hayrack
n (for fodder) → (Heu)raufe f; (US, on wagon) → Heuwagenaufbau m
hayrick, haystack
nHeuhaufen m

hay

[heɪ] nfieno
to make hay while the sun shines (Proverb) → battere il ferro finché è caldo

hay

(hei) noun
grass, cut and dried, used as food for cattle etc.
ˌhay-ˈfever noun
an illness like a bad cold, caused by the pollen of flowers etc.
ˈhayrick (-rik) , ˈhay-stack nouns
hay built up into a large pile.
ˈhaywire adjective
in a state of disorder; crazy. Our computer has gone haywire.

hay

تِبْـن seno Heu άχυρο heno heinä foin sijeno paglia 干し草 건초 hooi høy siano feno сено หญ้าแห้ง saman cỏ khô 干草
References in classic literature ?
He pointed to the truss of hay and said: "What are those two curious things sticking out of the hay?
He still, however, slept on, and did not awake till he found himself in the mouth of the cow; for the cook had put the hay into the cow's rick, and the cow had taken Tom up in a mouthful of it.
Finally, not finding anything else in the manger, he tasted the hay.
Trail, trail, went her long dress over the sopping grass, and she came back with her hands full of the hay that was cut yesterday--I suppose for rabbits or something, as she kept on smelling it.
There's nothing but hay left now,' the Messenger said, peeping into the bag.
The hay which we shall purchase for our horses this evening - I shall expect to find the stalks about fifty feet long.
On the hill-top above me sat the rising moon; pale yet as a cloud, but brightening momentarily, she looked over Hay, which, half lost in trees, sent up a blue smoke from its few chimneys: it was yet a mile distant, but in the absolute hush I could hear plainly its thin murmurs of life.
At the corner, where the jail stood, the progress of the ladies was impeded, for a moment, by the oxen, who were turned up to the side of the building, and given a lock of hay, which they had carried on their necks, as a reward for their patient labor, The whole of this was so natural, and so common, that Elizabeth saw nothing to induce a second glance at the team, until she heard the teamster speaking to his cattle in a low voice:
Within a few weeks the card had vanished from number one, and it was known that Admiral Hay Denver, V.
The first stall was a large square one, shut in behind with a wooden gate; the others were common stalls, good stalls, but not nearly so large; it had a low rack for hay and a low manger for corn; it was called a loose box, because the horse that was put into it was not tied up, but left loose, to do as he liked.
That was a misfortune no one could remedy, for the peasants of the district burned their hay rather than let the French have it.
Through this floating, fusty DEBRIS of peat and hay, mixed with the perspirations and warmth of the dancers, and forming together a sort of vegeto-human pollen, the muted fiddles feebly pushed their notes, in marked contrast to the spirit with which the measure was trodden out.