head restraint


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head restraint

n
(Automotive Engineering) an adjustable support for the head, attached to a car seat, to prevent the neck from being jolted backwards sharply in the event of a crash or sudden stop
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.head restraint - a cushion attached to the top of the back of an automobile's seat to prevent whiplashhead restraint - a cushion attached to the top of the back of an automobile's seat to prevent whiplash
car seat - a seat in a car
cushion - a soft bag filled with air or a mass of padding such as feathers or foam rubber etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Improper seat height (28 percent) and improper head restraint height (21 percent)
David Stephens, 55, was trying to put it into a head restraint for a TB test.
Make sure your head restraint is set at the right height for you.
Also accessory power socket (12V), tilt-adjustable steering column, tyre mobility kit, manual front windows, ISOFIX, smokers pack, rear centre head restraint and automatic start/stop technology.
Improper positioning of your seat and head restraint are scientifically proven to have an impact in the event of an accident and can cause anything from whiplash to airbags exploding too close to your chest or face, causing serious injuries.
The BOA also found 42 per cent of drivers in the region do not have their head close enough to the head restraint and 50 per cent never adjusted their head restraint depending on which vehicle they were travelling in.
To achieve this effect, the head restraint must be positioned as close to the back of the head as possible.
They've also engineered the seat so that not only is the position of the head restraint correlated with the position of the seat: as the seat is moved fore or aft, the head restraint, which has horizontal travel of approximately 14 mm, moves so that it can be in the right position for people between the 5th and 95th percentiles.
It can easily be installed to the head restraint posts and the system has been crash-tested.
Mary Williams, chief executive of Huddersfield-based Brake, said: "Even if drivers did regularly check their head restraint, the research shows us that most drivers wouldn't have a clue whether it was correct or not, which largely explains why they don't bother.
These injuries can be limited by a high seat back or a separate head restraint positioned behind and close to the occupant's head [16] (Figure 1(e)).
The top of the head restraint should be level with the top of the driver's head, or at least no lower then eye level.