headstay

headstay

(ˈhɛdˌsteɪ)
n
(Nautical Terms) nautical a rope or wire support from mast to bow on a boat

head•stay

(ˈhɛdˌsteɪ)

n.
(on a sailing vessel) a stay leading forward from the head of the foremost mast to the stem head or the end of the bowsprit.
[1955–60; head + stay3]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Our new carbon rig is slightly stiffer and we're seeing higher headstay loads as sail technology improves and resultant load transferral into the boat," explains Carkeek.
In the Maxi class, the Swan 80 Selene continued its winning ways, sweeping ahead of Whisper and Idea of London (and the Swan too Varsovie, which retired from the regatta after damaging its headstay on the first day of racing) to victory.
I clipped a lot of those jib snaps onto headstays of all sizes long before anyone dreamed up roller furling let alone headstay foils.
Eventually the Volvo Ocean Race fleet arrived in Hobart battered and bruised: Djuice had suffered a serious leak which filled the bow compartments with water; Amer Sports Two had a headstay failure; SEB didn't even make it to Hobart and retired with a broken rudder.
A Y-shaped main beam supports the mast and allows a bowsprit to extend 10 to 12 feet forward of the hulls to carry an 8,000-square-foot (743-square-metre) gennaker which is set on a removable furling headstay.
The masthead rig has been a real plus in this configuration overcoming any headstay sag in the runnerless sailplan and it is also of great benefit with non overlapping headsails.
Perhaps it's the combination of IMS-cruiser hull and racing foils, or perhaps the carbon rig (which increases headstay tension and must reduce the normal cruiser racer tendency to hobbyhorse) is the secret.