heap


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heap

 (hēp)
n.
1. A group of things placed or thrown, one on top of the other: a heap of dirty rags lying in the corner.
2. often heaps Informal A great deal; a lot: We have heaps of homework tonight.
3. Slang An old or run-down car.
tr.v. heaped, heap·ing, heaps
1. To put or throw in a pile: heaped the clothes on the bed.
2. To fill completely or to overflowing: heap a plate with vegetables.
3. To bestow in abundance or lavishly: heaped praise on the rescuers.

[Middle English, from Old English hēap.]
Synonyms: heap, mound, pile1, stack
These nouns denote a group or collection of things lying one on top of the other: a heap of old newspapers; a mound of boulders; a pile of boxes; a stack of firewood.

heap

(hiːp)
n
1. a collection of articles or mass of material gathered together in one place
2. informal (usually foll by: of) a large number or quantity
3. give them heaps slang Austral to contend strenuously with an opposing sporting team
4. give it heaps slang NZ to try very hard
5. informal a place or thing that is very old, untidy, unreliable, etc: the car was a heap.
adv
heaps (intensifier): he said he was feeling heaps better.
vb
6. (often foll by: up or together) to collect or be collected into or as if into a heap or pile: to heap up wealth.
7. (tr; often foll by with, on, or upon) to load or supply (with) abundantly: to heap with riches.
[Old English héap; related to Old Frisian hāp, Old Saxon hōp, Old High German houf]
ˈheaper n

heap

(hip)

n.
1. a group of things placed, thrown, or lying one on another; pile: a heap of stones.
2. Informal. a great quantity or number; multitude.
3. Slang. a dilapidated automobile.
v.t.
4. to gather, put, or cast in a heap; pile.
5. to accumulate; amass (often fol. by up or together): to heap up riches.
6. to give, assign, or bestow in great quantity; load (often fol. by on or upon): to heap blessings upon someone.
7. to load, supply, or fill abundantly: to heap a plate with food.
v.i.
8. to become heaped or piled, as sand or snow; rise in a heap or heaps (often fol. by up).
[before 900; Middle English heep, Old English hēap, c. Old Saxon hōp, Old High German houf]
heap′er, n.
heap′y, adj.

heap

  • mogul - A small mound of snow on a ski course, from Old Norse mugl, "little heap."
  • congeries - A Latin word meaning "heap or pile of disparate items" or "disorderly collection."
  • midden - Traces back to Scandinavian forms mog, "muck," and dynge, "heap," and first meant "dunghill" before it denoted a prehistoric or historic refuse heap.
  • accumulate - One of its Latin elements is cumulus, "a heap."

Heap

 a pile or mass; a collection of things thrown together; a crowd; a large number.
Examples: a heap of castles, 1661; of confessors, 1340; of fowls, 1290; of gravel, 1398; of hard names, 1741; of hounds, 1377; of good ideas; of islands, 1697; of learned men; of old papers and parchments, 1574; of people, 1590; of servants, 1867; of sheep, 1477; of sins; of trouble.

heap

stackpile
1. 'heap'

A heap of things is usually untidy, and often has the shape of a hill or mound.

The building collapsed into a heap of rubble.
2. 'stack'

A stack is usually tidy, and often consists of flat objects placed directly on top of each other.

...a neat stack of dishes.
Eric came out of his room with a small stack of CDs in his hands.
3. 'pile'

A pile of things can be tidy or untidy.

...a neat pile of clothes.
He reached over to a pile of newspapers and magazines

heap


Past participle: heaped
Gerund: heaping

Imperative
heap
heap
Present
I heap
you heap
he/she/it heaps
we heap
you heap
they heap
Preterite
I heaped
you heaped
he/she/it heaped
we heaped
you heaped
they heaped
Present Continuous
I am heaping
you are heaping
he/she/it is heaping
we are heaping
you are heaping
they are heaping
Present Perfect
I have heaped
you have heaped
he/she/it has heaped
we have heaped
you have heaped
they have heaped
Past Continuous
I was heaping
you were heaping
he/she/it was heaping
we were heaping
you were heaping
they were heaping
Past Perfect
I had heaped
you had heaped
he/she/it had heaped
we had heaped
you had heaped
they had heaped
Future
I will heap
you will heap
he/she/it will heap
we will heap
you will heap
they will heap
Future Perfect
I will have heaped
you will have heaped
he/she/it will have heaped
we will have heaped
you will have heaped
they will have heaped
Future Continuous
I will be heaping
you will be heaping
he/she/it will be heaping
we will be heaping
you will be heaping
they will be heaping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been heaping
you have been heaping
he/she/it has been heaping
we have been heaping
you have been heaping
they have been heaping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been heaping
you will have been heaping
he/she/it will have been heaping
we will have been heaping
you will have been heaping
they will have been heaping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been heaping
you had been heaping
he/she/it had been heaping
we had been heaping
you had been heaping
they had been heaping
Conditional
I would heap
you would heap
he/she/it would heap
we would heap
you would heap
they would heap
Past Conditional
I would have heaped
you would have heaped
he/she/it would have heaped
we would have heaped
you would have heaped
they would have heaped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heap - a collection of objects laid on top of each otherheap - a collection of objects laid on top of each other
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
compost heap, compost pile - a heap of manure and vegetation and other organic residues that are decaying to become compost
muckheap, muckhill, dunghill, midden - a heap of dung or refuse
scrapheap - pile of discarded metal
shock - a pile of sheaves of grain set on end in a field to dry; stalks of Indian corn set up in a field; "corn is bound in small sheaves and several sheaves are set up together in shocks"; "whole fields of wheat in shock"
slagheap - pile of waste matter from coal mining etc
stack - an orderly pile
funeral pyre, pyre - wood heaped for burning a dead body as a funeral rite
woodpile - a pile or stack of wood to be used for fuel
stockpile - a storage pile accumulated for future use
2.heap - (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extentheap - (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent; "a batch of letters"; "a deal of trouble"; "a lot of money"; "he made a mint on the stock market"; "see the rest of the winners in our huge passel of photos"; "it must have cost plenty"; "a slew of journalists"; "a wad of money"
large indefinite amount, large indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is above the average in size or magnitude
deluge, flood, inundation, torrent - an overwhelming number or amount; "a flood of requests"; "a torrent of abuse"
haymow - a mass of hay piled up in a barn for preservation
3.heap - a car that is old and unreliableheap - a car that is old and unreliable; "the fenders had fallen off that old bus"
auto, automobile, car, motorcar, machine - a motor vehicle with four wheels; usually propelled by an internal combustion engine; "he needs a car to get to work"
dysphemism - an offensive or disparaging expression that is substituted for an inoffensive one; "his favorite dysphemism was to ask for axle grease when he wanted butter"
Verb1.heap - bestow in large quantities; "He heaped him with work"; "She heaped scorn upon him"
give - transfer possession of something concrete or abstract to somebody; "I gave her my money"; "can you give me lessons?"; "She gave the children lots of love and tender loving care"
2.heap - arrange in stacks; "heap firewood around the fireplace"; "stack your books up on the shelves"
arrange, set up - put into a proper or systematic order; "arrange the books on the shelves in chronological order"
rick - pile in ricks; "rick hay"
cord - stack in cords; "cord firewood"
heap up, stack up, pile up - arrange into piles or stacks; "She piled up her books in my living room"
3.heap - fill to overflow; "heap the platter with potatoes"
fill, fill up, make full - make full, also in a metaphorical sense; "fill a container"; "fill the child with pride"

heap

noun
2. (often plural) (Informal) a lot, lots (informal), plenty, masses, load(s) (informal), ocean(s), great deal, quantities, tons, stack(s), lashings (Brit. informal), abundance, oodles (informal) You have heaps of time.
verb
1. (sometimes with up) pile, store, collect, gather, stack, accumulate, mound, amass, stockpile, hoard, bank They were heaping up wood for a bonfire.
heap something on someone load with, burden with, confer on, assign to, bestow on, shower upon He heaped scorn on both their methods and motives.

heap

noun
1. A group of things gathered haphazardly:
2. Informal. A great deal:
Informal: barrel, lot, pack, peck, pile.
Regional: power, sight.
3. Informal. An indeterminately great amount or number.Often used in plural:
jillion, million (often used in plural), multiplicity, ream, trillion.
Informal: bushel, gob (often used in plural), load (often used in plural), lot, oodles, passel, peck, scad (often used in plural), slew, wad, zillion.
verb
1. To put into a disordered pile:
2. To make or become full; put as much into as can be held:
3. To fill to overflowing:
4. To give in great abundance:
Translations
كثير مِن، وَفْرَة منكَوْمَةكومَه، عَدَد كبيريُكَوِّميَمْلأ، يُغَطّي
haldahromadahromaditnaskládat na hromaduspousta
dyngedynge sammenmasseskovlebunke
kasa
hrpa
mennyiség: nagy mennyiségtelerak
hellingurhrúga á, ausahrúga samanhrúga; hellingur
積み重なったもの
무더기
krūvaprikrautisu kaupusumesti į krūvą
apbērtbiežigrēdakaudzemilzums
naklásť/nahádzať na kopu
kopičitikup
hög
กอง
yığınyığmakbir yığınçokdoldurmak
đống

heap

[hiːp]
A. N
1. (= pile) → montón m, pila f
her clothes lay in a heap on the floorsu ropa estaba amontonada en el suelo
2. (fig) → montón m
a whole heap of troubleun montón de disgustos
a whole heap of peopleun montón de gente, muchísima gente
see also heaps
3. (= old car) → cacharro m
B. VT (also to heap up) [+ stones etc] → amontonar, apilar; [+ bricks, coal] → amontonar (onto sobre) to heap sth togetherjuntar algo en un montón
to heap a plate with foodcolmar un plato de comida
to heap favours/praise on sbcolmar a algn de favores/elogios
heaped tablespoonful (Culin) → cucharada f colmada
heap up VT + ADV [+ stones etc] → amontonar, apilar; [+ wealth] → acumular

heap

[ˈhiːp]
n
(= pile) [objects] → tas m, monceau m
a rubbish heap → un tas d'ordures
to be at the bottom of the heap (fig) [person] → être en bas de l'échelle
to be at the top of the heap (fig) [person] → être en haut de l'échelle
to collapse in a heap [person] → s'effondrer comme une masse
(= lot) → tas m
a heap of sth → un tas de qch
heaps (= lots) → des tas
heaps of [+ time, money, work] → beaucoup de
vt
(= pile) [+ sand, earth, clothes] → entasser, amonceler
to heap sth on sb's plate, to heap sb's plate with sth → charger l'assiette de qn de qch
to heap praise on sb → couvrir qn d'éloges
to heap scorn on sb → couvrir qn de mépris
to heap gifts on sb → couvrir qn de cadeaux
heap up
vtentasser

heap

n
Haufen m; (inf: = old car) → Klapperkiste f (inf); (to leave something) in a heap(etw) auf einem Haufen (liegen lassen); the building was reduced to a heap of rubbledas Haus sank in Schutt und Asche; he fell in a heap on the floorer sackte zu Boden; at the bottom/top of the heap (fig)ganz unten/oben
heaps of (inf)ein(en) Haufen (inf); it’s happened heaps of timeses ist schon zigmal vorgekommen (inf); do you have any glasses? — yes, heapshaben Sie Gläser? — (ja,) jede Menge (inf); she has heaps of enthusiasm/timesie hat jede Menge Enthusiasmus/Zeit (inf); to be in a whole heap of troubletief in Schwierigkeiten stecken; they got heaps of criticismsie wurden massiv kritisiert
adv heaps (inf)(unheimlich) viel
vthäufen; he heaped his clothes togetherer warf seine Kleider auf einen Haufen; to heap praise on somebody/somethingüber jdn/etw voll des Lobes sein (geh), → jdn/etw über den grünen Klee loben (inf); (in addressing) → jdn mit Lob überschütten; to heap scorn on somebody/somethingjdn/etw mit Spott übergießen; to heap abuse on somebodyjdm Beleidigungen an den Kopf werfen; (cursing) → jdn mit einer Flut von Schimpfwörtern überschütten; a heaped spoonfulein gehäufter Löffel; an armchair heaped with cushionsein Sessel, auf dem sich Kissen türmen

heap

[hiːp]
1. n (pile) → mucchio, cumulo (fam) (old car) → macinino; (lots) heaps (of)un sacco (di), un mucchio (di)
we have heaps of time → abbiamo un mucchio or sacco di tempo
I was struck or knocked all of a heap (fam) → sono rimasto di stucco
2. vt to heap sth onto sthammucchiare qc su qc
the waitress heaped potatoes onto my plate → la cameriera mi ha dato una montagna or un mucchio di patate
to heap sth with sth → colmare qc di qc
to heap favours/praise/gifts on sb → ricolmare qn di favori/lodi/regali
heaped spoonful (Culin) → cucchiaio colmo
heap up vt + advaccumulare, ammucchiare

heap

(hiːp) noun
1. a large amount or a large number, in a pile. a heap of sand/apples.
2. (usually in plural with of) many, much or plenty. We've got heaps of time; I've done that heaps of times.
verb
1. to put, throw etc in a heap. I'll heap these stones (up) in a corner of the garden.
2. to fill or cover with a heap. He heaped his plate with vegetables; He heaped insults on his opponent.
heaped adjective
having enough (of something) on it to form a heap. A heaped spoonful of sugar.

heap

كَوْمَة halda dynge Haufen σωρός montón kasa tas hrpa mucchio 積み重なったもの 무더기 hoop haug sterta amontoado куча hög กอง yığın đống
References in classic literature ?
I've laid in a heap of books, and I'm going to improve my shining hours reading on my perch in the old apple tree, when I'm not having l.
He was still silent but began at once to erect a heap of dry sticks which he presently set afire.
Its folds relaxed, and the coils of the great body fell in a heap at the roots of the two trees, between which the scientist had been standing.
The black ground-shadows were already crowding over the heap in the road, and one horse ran out across the fields, his harness hanging to him, wolves at his heels.
When his triumph had ceased, he cast the brush on the slight heap Duncan had made before the entrance of the second cavern, and closed the view.
We got a billiard-table over from Stockton," half bashfully interrupted Dick Mattingly, struggling from his end of the trunk to recover his composure, "and it had to be brought over in sections on the back of a mule, so I don't see why--" He stopped short again in confusion, at a sign from his brother, and then added, "I mean, of course, that a piano is a heap more delicate, and valuable, and all that sort of thing, but it's worth trying for.
I could account for their being included in the heap of Custom-House lumber only by the fact that Mr.
Now, as you well know, it is not seldom the case in this conventional world of ours --watery or otherwise; that when a person placed in command over his fellow-men finds one of them to be very significantly his superior in general pride of manhood, straightway against that man he conceives an unconquerable dislike and bitterness; and if he have a chance he will pull down and pulverize that subaltern's tower, and make a little heap of dust of it.
But suddenly in the distance, they saw a great heap of tumultuous white water, and soon after news came from aloft that one or both the boats must be fast.
An old road-mender was standing near a heap of stones, his shovel dropped and his hands raised.
So he tied up his feet, and went on limping about and coughing, until at last he fell to pieces, all at once and in a heap, like the One-Horse Shay.
Depend on it, Tom, a little humanity, thrown in along, goes a heap further than all your jawin' and crackin'; and it pays better,' says I, `depend on 't.