heaping


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heap

 (hēp)
n.
1. A group of things placed or thrown, one on top of the other: a heap of dirty rags lying in the corner.
2. often heaps Informal A great deal; a lot: We have heaps of homework tonight.
3. Slang An old or run-down car.
tr.v. heaped, heap·ing, heaps
1. To put or throw in a pile: heaped the clothes on the bed.
2. To fill completely or to overflowing: heap a plate with vegetables.
3. To bestow in abundance or lavishly: heaped praise on the rescuers.

[Middle English, from Old English hēap.]
Synonyms: heap, mound, pile1, stack
These nouns denote a group or collection of things lying one on top of the other: a heap of old newspapers; a mound of boulders; a pile of boxes; a stack of firewood.

heaping

(ˈhiːpɪŋ)
adj
US and Canadian (of a spoonful) heaped
References in classic literature ?
Amy, who was fond of delicate fare, took a heaping spoonful, choked, hid her face in her napkin, and left the table precipitately.
So you did--so you did, honey," said Aunt Chloe, heaping the smoking batter-cakes on his plate; "you know'd your old aunty'd keep the best for you.
He encouraged him to regard Hindley as a reprobate; and, night after night, he regularly grumbled out a long string of tales against Heathcliff and Catherine: always minding to flatter Earnshaw's weakness by heaping the heaviest blame on the latter.
It was an aggravating circumstance in the case that he had no idea of this, but conceived that he was making me amends in every new discovery: not to say, heaping obligations on my head.
Mr Wopsle had in his hand the affecting tragedy of George Barnwell, in which he had that moment invested sixpence, with the view of heaping every word of it on the head of Pumblechook, with whom he was going to drink tea.
The people seemed never to tire of heaping honors upon me, and no day passed that did not bring some new proof of their love for my princess, the incomparable Dejah Thoris.