hearsay


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to hearsay: hearsay rule, hearsay evidence

hear·say

 (hîr′sā′)
n.
1. Unverified information heard or received from another; rumor.
2. Law Evidence that is not within the personal knowledge of a witness, such as testimony regarding statements made by someone other than the witness, and that therefore may be inadmissible to establish the truth of a particular contention because the accuracy of the evidence cannot be verified through cross-examination.

hearsay

(ˈhɪəˌseɪ)
n
gossip; rumour

hear•say

(ˈhɪərˌseɪ)

n.
unverified information acquired from another; rumor.
[1525–35; orig. in phrase by hear say, translation of Middle French par ouïr dire]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hearsay - gossip (usually a mixture of truth and untruth) passed around by word of mouthhearsay - gossip (usually a mixture of truth and untruth) passed around by word of mouth
scuttlebutt, gossip, comment - a report (often malicious) about the behavior of other people; "the divorce caused much gossip"
Adj.1.hearsay - heard through another rather than directly; "hearsay information"
indirect - extended senses; not direct in manner or language or behavior or action; "making indirect but legitimate inquiries"; "an indirect insult"; "doubtless they had some indirect purpose in mind"; "though his methods are indirect they are not dishonest"; "known as a shady indirect fellow"

hearsay

noun rumour, talk, gossip, report, buzz, dirt (U.S. slang), word of mouth, tittle-tattle, talk of the town, scuttlebutt (slang, chiefly U.S.), idle talk, mere talk, on dit (French) Much of what was reported to them was hearsay.

hearsay

noun
Idle, often sensational and groundless talk about others:
Slang: scuttlebutt.
Translations
إشاعَه، تَقَوُّلات
doslech
rygte
hallomás
sögusögn, kvittur
čo sa vraví

hearsay

[ˈhɪəseɪ]
A. Nrumores mpl
it's just hearsayson rumores nada más
by hearsayde oídas
B. CPD hearsay evidence Ntestimonio m de oídas

hearsay

[ˈhɪərseɪ] non-dit m inv, rumeurs fpl
to know sth by hearsay → être au courant de qch par ouï-direhearsay evidence npreuve f par ouï-dire

hearsay

nGerüchte pl; to know something from or by hearsayetw vom Hörensagen wissen or haben; hearsay rule (Jur) Regel über den grundsätzlichen Ausschluss aller Beweise vom Hörensagen

hearsay

:
hearsay account
hearsay evidence

hearsay

[ˈhɪəˌseɪ] ndiceria, chiacchiere fpl
by hearsay → per sentito dire

hear

(hiə) verbpast tense, past participle heard (həːd)
1. to (be able to) receive (sounds) by ear. I don't hear very well; Speak louder – I can't hear you; I didn't hear you come in.
2. to listen to for some purpose. A judge hears court cases; Part of a manager's job is to hear workers' complaints.
3. to receive information, news etc, not only by ear. I've heard that story before; I hear that you're leaving; `Have you heard from your sister?' `Yes, I got a letter from her today'; I've never heard of him – who is he? This is the first I've heard of the plan.
ˈhearing noun
1. the ability to hear. My hearing is not very good.
2. the distance within which something can be heard. I don't want to tell you when so many people are within hearing; I think we're out of hearing now.
3. an act of listening. We ought to give his views a fair hearing.
4. a court case. The hearing is tomorrow.
ˈhearing-aid noun
a small electronic instrument which helps deaf people to hear better by making sounds louder by means of an amplifier.
ˈhearsay (-sei) noun
that which one has been told about by others but for which one has otherwise no evidence. I never trust anything that I learn by hearsay.
hear! hear!
a shout to show that one agrees with what a speaker has said (eg in Parliament or at a meeting).
I/he etc will/would not hear of
I, he etc will or would not allow. They would not hear of her going home alone, and insisted on going with her.
References in classic literature ?
Not more than one in ten had ever really tried it; the other nine had contented themselves with hearsay evidence and a peep through the door.
The inventor of the language probably got what he knew about a conscience from hearsay.
Captain Wragge had begun by interesting her in the remote past, which she only knew by hearsay, before he ventured on the delicate ground of her own experience.
All this I know well myself, more by experience than by hearsay, and some day, senora, I will enlighten you on the subject, for I am of your flesh and blood too.
I am glad, by the way, to take this opportunity of requesting posterity never to believe on hearsay that anything has proceeded from me which has not been published by myself; and I am not at all astonished at the extravagances attributed to those ancient philosophers whose own writings we do not possess; whose thoughts, however, I do not on that account suppose to have been really absurd, seeing they were among the ablest men of their times, but only that these have been falsely represented to us.
Malbihn's boys had been no exception to the rule and as many of them had been with him at various times during the past ten years there was little about his acts and life in the African wilds that was not known directly or by hearsay to them all.
Afterwards he found that the vague feeling of alarm had spread to the clients of the underground railway, and that the Sunday excursionists began to return from all over the South-Western "lung"--Barnes, Wimbledon, Richmond Park, Kew, and so forth--at unnaturally early hours; but not a soul had anything more than vague hearsay to tell of.
You do not know these men, Monsieur Comminges, but I know them, first personally, also by hearsay.
It is more needful that I should have a fibre of sympathy connecting me with that vulgar citizen who weighs out my sugar in a vilely assorted cravat and waistcoat, than with the handsomest rascal in red scarf and green feathers--more needful that my heart should swell with loving admiration at some trait of gentle goodness in the faulty people who sit at the same hearth with me, or in the clergyman of my own parish, who is perhaps rather too corpulent and in other respects is not an Oberlin or a Tillotson, than at the deeds of heroes whom I shall never know except by hearsay, or at the sublimest abstract of all clerical graces that was ever conceived by an able novelist.
I had no doubt that the man knew of her being there; but he only knew it by hearsay.
She uttered these words as if the gondolas were a curious faraway craft which she knew only by hearsay.
Yes, sir, I've heard a good deal about him--of course it is not official; but hearsay must guide us at first.