heartache


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heart·ache

 (härt′āk′)
n.
Emotional anguish; sorrow.

heartache

(ˈhɑːtˌeɪk)
n
intense anguish or mental suffering

heart•ache

(ˈhɑrtˌeɪk)

n.
emotional distress; sorrow; grief; anguish.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heartache - intense sorrow caused by loss of a loved one (especially by death)heartache - intense sorrow caused by loss of a loved one (especially by death)
sorrow - an emotion of great sadness associated with loss or bereavement; "he tried to express his sorrow at her loss"
dolor, dolour - (poetry) painful grief

heartache

noun sorrow, suffering, pain, torture, distress, despair, grief, agony, torment, bitterness, anguish, remorse, heartbreak, affliction, heartsickness He had been the cause of so much heartache.

heartache

noun
Mental anguish or pain caused by loss or despair:
Translations
وَجَع قَلْب
úzkost
hjertesorgsmerte
szívfájdalom
hugarangur
büyük acıkalp ağrısı

heartache

[ˈhɑːteɪk] Npena f, dolor m

heartache

[ˈhɑːrteɪk] nchagrin m, douleur fheart attack ncrise f cardiaque
to have a heart attack → avoir une crise cardiaque

heartache

[ˈhɑːtˌeɪk] npene fpl, dolori mpl

heart

(haːt) noun
1. the organ which pumps blood through the body. How fast does a person's heart beat?; (also adjective) heart disease; a heart specialist.
2. the central part. I live in the heart of the city; in the heart of the forest; the heart of a lettuce; Let's get straight to the heart of the matter/problem.
3. the part of the body where one's feelings, especially of love, conscience etc are imagined to arise. She has a kind heart; You know in your heart that you ought to go; She has no heart (= She is not kind).
4. courage and enthusiasm. The soldiers were beginning to lose heart.
5. a symbol supposed to represent the shape of the heart; a white dress with little pink hearts on it; heart-shaped.
6. one of the playing-cards of the suit hearts, which have red symbols of this shape on them.
-hearted
kind-hearted; hard-hearted; broken-hearted.
ˈhearten verb
to encourage or cheer up. We were greatly heartened by the good news.
ˈheartless adjective
cruel; very unkind. a heartless remark.
ˈheartlessly adverb
ˈheartlessness noun
hearts noun plural
(sometimes treated as noun singular) one of the four card suits. the two of hearts.
ˈhearty adjective
1. very friendly. a hearty welcome.
2. enthusiastic. a hearty cheer.
3. very cheerful; too cheerful. a hearty person/laugh.
4. (of meals) large. He ate a hearty breakfast.
5. (of a person's appetite) large.
ˈheartily adverb
ˈheartiness noun
ˈheartache noun
(a feeling of) great sadness.
heart attack
a sudden failure of the heart to function correctly, sometimes causing death. My father has had a slight heart attack.
ˈheartbeat noun
(the sound of) the regular movement of the heart.
ˈheartbreak noun
(something which causes) great sorrow. I have suffered many heartbreaks in my life.
ˈheartbroken adjective
feeling very great sorrow. a heartbroken widow.
ˈheartburn noun
a burning feeling in the chest caused by indigestion. She suffers from heartburn after meals.
heart failure
the sudden stopping of the heart's beating. the old man died of heart failure.
ˈheartfelt adjective
sincere. heartfelt thanks.
ˌheart-to-ˈheart adjective
open and sincere, usually in private. I'm going to have a heart-to-heart talk with him.
noun
an open and sincere talk, usually in private. After our heart-to-heart I felt more cheerful.
ˈheart-warming adjective
causing a person to feel pleasure. It was heart-warming to see the happiness of the children.
at heart
really; basically. He seems rather stern but he is at heart a very kind man.
break someone's heart
to cause someone great sorrow. If you leave her, it'll break her heart.
by heart
from memory; by memorizing. The children know their multiplication tables by heart; Actors must learn their speeches (off) by heart.
from the bottom of one's heart
very sincerely. She thanked him from the bottom of her heart.
have a change of heart
to change a decision etc, usually to a better, kinder one. He's had a change of heart – he's going to help us after all.
have a heart!
show some pity!.
have at heart
to have a concern for or interest in. He has the interest of his workers at heart.
heart and soul
with all one's attention and energy. She devoted herself heart and soul to caring for her husband.
lose heart
to become discouraged.
not have the heart to
not to want or be unkind enough to (do something unpleasant). I don't have the heart to tell him that everyone laughed at his suggestions.
set one's heart on / have one's heart set on
to want very much. He had set his heart on winning the prize; He had his heart set on winning.
take heart
to become encouraged or more confident.
take to heart
1. to be made very sad or upset by. You mustn't take his unkind remarks to heart.
2. to pay attention to. He's taken my criticism to heart – his work has improved.
to one's heart's content
as much as one wants. She could play in the big garden to her heart's content.
with all one's heart
very willingly or sincerely. I hope with all my heart that you will be happy.
References in classic literature ?
I will tell all children about him, that they may take care and not play with him, for he will only cause them sorrow and many a heartache.
The beer frolic, however, passed off without any untoward circumstance; and, unlike most drinking bouts, left neither headache nor heartache behind.
Heaven knows what pains the author has been at, what bitter experiences he has endured and what heartache suffered, to give some chance reader a few hours' relaxation or to while away the tedium of a journey.
But if this is true, I found the books better than their friends, and had many a heartache from their pathos, many a genuine glow of purpose from their high import, many a tender suffusion from their sentiment.
In spite of her own perturbation and heartache, her hands had not been idle, and she stood now at the bedside with the quieting powder ready.
Anne was enjoying the excitement of the various preparations, but under it all she carried a little heartache.
It seems to me that they have treble their share of this world's heartache.
I have had a heartache ever since then--but it is gone now.
Tell her that, if she had mingled a little trust with her conception of the ideal, much heartache might have been avoided.
Pocket being justly celebrated for giving most excellent practical advice, and for having a clear and sound perception of things and a highly judicious mind, I had some notion in my heartache of begging him to accept my confidence.
She was carrying an armful of Bibles for her class, and such was her view of life that events which produced heartache in others wrought beatific smiles upon her--an enviable result, although, in the opinion of Angel, it was obtained by a curiously unnatural sacrifice of humanity to mysticism.
Isabel secured the envelope the moment she laid down her pen, and retired to her room with a headache (which was heartache in disguise) for the rest of the day.