heat


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Related to heat: heat exhaustion, heat pump, heat energy, heat stroke, specific heat, Heat transfer

heat

 (hēt)
n.
1. Physics
a. A form of energy associated with the motion of atoms or molecules and capable of being transmitted through solid and fluid media by conduction, through fluid media by convection, and through empty space by radiation.
b. The transfer of energy from one body to another as a result of a difference in temperature or a change in phase.
2. The sensation or perception of such energy as warmth or hotness.
3. An abnormally high bodily temperature, as from a fever.
4.
a. The condition of being hot.
b. A degree of warmth or hotness: The burner was on low heat.
5.
a. The warming of a room or building by a furnace or another source of energy: The house was cheap to rent, but the heat was expensive.
b. A furnace or other source of warmth in a room or building: The heat was on when we returned from work.
6. A hot season; a spell of hot weather.
7.
a. Intensity, as of passion, emotion, color, appearance, or effect.
b. The most intense or active stage: the heat of battle.
c. A burning sensation in the mouth produced by spicy flavoring in food.
8. Estrus.
9. One of a series of efforts or attempts.
10.
a. Sports & Games One round of several in a competition, such as a race.
b. A preliminary contest held to determine finalists.
11. Informal Pressure; stress.
12. Slang
a. An intensification of police activity in pursuing criminals.
b. The police. Used with the.
13. Slang Adverse comments or hostile criticism: Heat from the press forced the senator to resign.
14. Slang A firearm, especially a pistol.
v. heat·ed, heat·ing, heats
v.tr.
1. To make warm or hot.
2. To excite the feelings of; inflame.
3. Physics To increase the molecular or kinetic energy of (an object).
v.intr.
1. To become warm or hot.
2. To become excited emotionally or intellectually.
Phrasal Verb:
heat up Informal
To become acute or intense: "If inflation heats up, interest rates could increase" (Christian Science Monitor).

[Middle English hete, from Old English hǣtu; see kai- in Indo-European roots.]

heat

(hiːt)
n
1. (General Physics)
a. the energy transferred as a result of a difference in temperature
b. the random kinetic energy of the atoms, molecules, or ions in a substance or body
2. (Physiology) the sensation caused in the body by heat energy; warmth
3. the state or quality of being hot
4. hot weather: the heat of summer.
5. intensity of feeling; passion: the heat of rage.
6. pressure: the political heat on the government over the economy.
7. the most intense or active part: the heat of the battle.
8. (Zoology) a period or condition of sexual excitement in female mammals that occurs at oestrus
9. (Individual Sports, other than specified) sport
a. a preliminary eliminating contest in a competition
b. a single section of a contest
10. slang police activity after a crime: the heat is off.
11. chiefly slang US criticism or abuse: he took a lot of heat for that mistake.
12. in the heat of the moment without pausing to think
13. (Zoology) on heat in heat
a. Also: in season (of some female mammals) sexually receptive
b. in a state of sexual excitement
14. the heat slang the police
15. turn up the heat turn on the heat informal to increase the intensity of activity, coercion, etc
vb
16. to make or become hot or warm
17. to make or become excited or intense
[Old English hǣtu; related to hāt hot, Old Frisian hēte heat, Old High German heizī]
ˈheatless adj

heat

(hit)

n.
1. the condition or quality of being hot; the state of a body having or generating a high degree of warmth.
2. degree of hotness; temperature: moderate heat.
3. the sensation of warmth or hotness.
4. a bodily temperature higher than normal.
5. a source of heat, as a stove burner or furnace.
6. added or external energy that causes a rise in temperature, expansion, or other physical change.
7. Physics. a nonmechanical energy transfer between regions of different temperature, as between a system and its surroundings or between two parts of the same system. Symbol: Q
8. hot weather or climate.
9. a period of hot weather.
10. sharp, pungent flavor; spiciness.
11. warmth or intensity of feeling; vehemence; passion.
12. maximum intensity in an activity or condition; height: the heat of battle; the heat of passion.
13. tension or strain, as from the pressure of events: in the heat of a hasty departure.
14. Slang.
a. pursuit or investigation by the police.
b. intensified or coercive pressure: to put the heat on someone.
c. censure; blame; hostile response.
d. the police.
e. a firearm; gun.
15. a single intense effort or operation: The painting was finished at a heat.
16.
a. a single course in or division of a race or other contest.
b. a race or other contest in which competitors attempt to qualify for entry in the final race or contest.
17.
a. a single operation of heating, as of metal in a furnace, in the treating and melting of metals.
b. a quantity of metal produced by such an operation.
18.
a. sexual receptiveness in animals, esp. females.
b. the period or duration of such receptiveness: to be in heat.
19. an indication of high temperature, as by the color or condition of something.
v.t.
20. to make hot or warm (often fol. by up).
21. to excite emotionally; inflame; rouse.
v.i.
22. to become hot or warm (often fol. by up).
23. to become excited emotionally.
24. heat up, to increase or become more active or intense.
[before 900; Middle English hete, Old English hǣtu, c. Old Frisian, Middle Dutch hēte, Old High German heizī; n. derivative from base of hot]
heat′a•ble, adj.

heat

(hēt)
A form of energy produced by the motion of molecules. The heat of a substance is the total energy produced by the motion of its molecules. See Note at temperature. See estrus.

heat

- As a preliminary race for a sporting contest, it is so called because of its intensity.
See also related terms for intensity.

Heat

See also cold; fire

the ability of light and heat and other forms of radiant energy to cause chemical changes, as hormonal changes in birds causing them to migrate or brood. — actinic, adj.
imperviousness to radiant heat or infrared radiation. Also called athermancy.
adiathermancy.
the science of measuring heat. — calorimeter, n. — calorimetric, adj.
Rare. one who believed the caloric theory, that heat is a material substance. — caloristic, adj.
the process of generating heat by means of an electric current.
the branch of geology that measures temperatures deep below the surface of the earth; geologic thermometry.
the production or generation of heat. — pyrogenetic, adj.
the chemical process of decomposition under the effect of heat. — pyrolitic, adj.
a type of pyrometer that measures temperature optically or photometrically.
a moderate warmth; lukewarmness. — tepid, adj.
Medicine. the study of heat as a medical remedy or therapy. Also called thermotherapy.
the science or study of the emission of electrons from substances at high temperatures. — thermionic, adj.
the branch of chemistry that studies the relationship of heat to chemical changes, including the production of energy. — thermochemist, n. — thermochemical, adj.
the branch of physics that studies the relationship of heat and mechanical energy and the conversion, in various materials, of one into the other. — thermodynamicist, n. — thermodynamic, thermodynamical, adj.
the production of heat, especially in an animal body by physiological processes. — thermogenic, thermogenous, adj.
1. Engineering, a method of measuring surf ace temperatures by using luminescent materials.
2. a printing or photocopying process using infrared rays and heat.
3. a process of photography using far-infrared radiation; thermal photography. — thermographer, n. — thermographic, adj.
the study of the movement of heat. — thermokinematic, adj.
Archaic. the science and study of heat. Also called thermotics.
Atomic Physics. any luminescence appearing in materials upon application of heat, caused by electron movement which increases as the temperature rises. — thermoluminescent, adj.
Physiology. the dispersion of heat from the body. — thermolytic, adj.
the branch of physics that deals with the measurement of temperature. — thermometric, adj.
an abnormal fear of heat.
a device for giving an approximation of the temperature change of a substance by noting the accompanying change in its volume. — thermoscopic, adj.
the science or study of the equilibrium of heat.
1. Biology. the movement of an organism toward or away from a source of heat.
2. Physiology. the regulation of body temperature by various physiological processes. — thermotactic, thermotaxic, adj.
thermatology.
thermology.
the property or quality by which matter permits the passage of heat. — transcalent, adj.

Heat

 

See Also: WEATHER

  1. The days were like hot coals —Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

    See Also: DAY

  2. A glaring, summery heat covered everything like a layer of glass —Jean Thompson
  3. The heat came down on you like a leaden mantle, stifling you as it did so —Dominique Lapierre
  4. [Midsummer] heat closed in like a hand over a murder victim’s mouth —Truman Capote
  5. Heat fell on her like a blanket —Julia O’Faolain
  6. Heat gathers like fog —Angela Carter
  7. Heat … heavy as water —Dan Jacobson
  8. The heat … hung like a hot dust vapor —H. E. Bates
  9. Heat lay on the pavement like a tired dog in the doorway of a house —Aharon Megged

    See Also: CITY/STREETSCAPES

  10. Heat shimmered and bent the fields like the landscape was a reflection in an old mirror —Will Weaver

    See Also: LANDSCAPES

  11. The heat thick as a swamp —Margaret Atwood
  12. Heat thick as jelly —Elizabeth Enright
  13. The heat was like a tyrant who hated his subjects —William H. Hallhan
  14. The heat was like a wasting disease —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  15. Heat waves … rising … like fumes off kerosene —Larry McMurtry
  16. Heat waves rose writhing like fine wavy hair —Wallace Stegner
  17. (Sun) hot as a blast furnace —Raymond Chandler
  18. Hot as a blister —Sir Francis C. Burnand
  19. Hot as a draft from hell —William H. Gass
  20. Hot as a four-alarm fire —H. C. Witwer
  21. Hot as a fox —Elizabeth Spencer
  22. Hot as a jungle —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  23. Hot as a mink in Africa —Reynolds Price
  24. Hot as an oven —The Holy Bible

    Writers and speakers have long repeated and enlarged upon this simile, changing the descriptive frame of reference altogether or switching from the oven to what comes out of it. Some of these old-timers include: “Hot as hell-fire” (John Dryden), “Hot as hate” (Hamlin Garland), “Hot as hammered hell/hot as hammered lightning” (American colloquialisms) and “Hot as a basted turkey” (Will Carleton).

  25. (On some nights, New York is as) hot as Bangkok —Saul Bellow
  26. Hot as live ash —Beryl Markham
  27. (I am as) hot as molten lead, and as heavy too —William Shakespeare
  28. (I’m) hot as shit —Richard Ford
  29. (Even the fog that day was) hot as soup —Marge Piercy
  30. Hot as the business end of a pistol —Delmore Schwartz
  31. Hot as the hinges of hell —Babs H. Deal
  32. The hot days pressed people flat as irons —Susan Fromberg Schaeffer
  33. Hot, like a furnace room —Frank Conroy
  34. It was like being inside a radiator —David Brierley
  35. It was more than hot: it was like being under a damp blanket in the tropics —Laurie Colwin
  36. Scorches like nettles —Babette Deutsch
  37. Steaming [from hot weather] like crabs in a soup pot —Margaret Laurence
  38. (The shallow ditches were) steaming like fresh cowflap —Paul Theroux
  39. [A hot bath] steams like a bowl of soup —Margaret Atwood
  40. (She was) trapped between the heat of the sun and the heat rising from the earth. It was like being struck simultaneously by gusts of fire from above and from below —Margaret Millar
  41. Warm as a newborn child —William Alfred
  42. Warm as summer —Walter Savage Landor
  43. Warm as veins —Ted Hughes
  44. (The water is) warm like my blood —Marge Piercy
  45. (A novel that) warms like a hug —Anon book blurb, quoted in advertisement from San Francisco Chronicle

heat

In informal English, if you want to emphasize how hot the weather is, you can say that it is boiling or scorching.

'It's boiling in here,' complained Miriam.
That race was run in scorching weather.

In winter, if the temperature is above average, you say that it is mild. In general, hot suggests a higher temperature than warm, and warm things are usually pleasant.

The area is famous for its mild climate.
It was too hot even for a gentle stroll.
...a warm evening.

heat


Past participle: heated
Gerund: heating

Imperative
heat
heat
Present
I heat
you heat
he/she/it heats
we heat
you heat
they heat
Preterite
I heated
you heated
he/she/it heated
we heated
you heated
they heated
Present Continuous
I am heating
you are heating
he/she/it is heating
we are heating
you are heating
they are heating
Present Perfect
I have heated
you have heated
he/she/it has heated
we have heated
you have heated
they have heated
Past Continuous
I was heating
you were heating
he/she/it was heating
we were heating
you were heating
they were heating
Past Perfect
I had heated
you had heated
he/she/it had heated
we had heated
you had heated
they had heated
Future
I will heat
you will heat
he/she/it will heat
we will heat
you will heat
they will heat
Future Perfect
I will have heated
you will have heated
he/she/it will have heated
we will have heated
you will have heated
they will have heated
Future Continuous
I will be heating
you will be heating
he/she/it will be heating
we will be heating
you will be heating
they will be heating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been heating
you have been heating
he/she/it has been heating
we have been heating
you have been heating
they have been heating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been heating
you will have been heating
he/she/it will have been heating
we will have been heating
you will have been heating
they will have been heating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been heating
you had been heating
he/she/it had been heating
we had been heating
you had been heating
they had been heating
Conditional
I would heat
you would heat
he/she/it would heat
we would heat
you would heat
they would heat
Past Conditional
I would have heated
you would have heated
he/she/it would have heated
we would have heated
you would have heated
they would have heated

heat

A form of energy passed between bodies of differing temperature.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heat - a form of energy that is transferred by a difference in temperatureheat - a form of energy that is transferred by a difference in temperature
energy, free energy - (physics) a thermodynamic quantity equivalent to the capacity of a physical system to do work; the units of energy are joules or ergs; "energy can take a wide variety of forms"
geothermal energy - energy derived from the heat in the interior of the earth
heat of dissociation - the heat required for a fluid substance to break up into simpler constituents
heat of formation - the heat evolved or absorbed during the formation of one mole of a substance from its component elements
heat of solution - the heat evolved or absorbed when one mole of a substance is dissolved in a large volume of a solvent
heat of transformation, latent heat - heat absorbed or radiated during a change of phase at a constant temperature and pressure
specific heat - the heat required to raise the temperature of one gram of a substance one degree centigrade
2.heat - the presence of heat
temperature - the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment (corresponding to its molecular activity)
calefaction, incalescence - the property of being warming
fieriness, red heat - the heat or the color of fire
torridity - extreme heat
warmness, warmth - the quality of having a moderate degree of heat; "an agreeable warmth in the house"
white heat - the hotness of something heated until it turns white
3.heat - the sensation caused by heat energyheat - the sensation caused by heat energy
temperature - the somatic sensation of cold or heat
4.heat - the trait of being intensely emotionalheat - the trait of being intensely emotional
emotionalism, emotionality - emotional nature or quality
fieriness - a passionate and quick-tempered nature
5.heat - applies to nonhuman mammals: a state or period of heightened sexual arousal and activityheat - applies to nonhuman mammals: a state or period of heightened sexual arousal and activity
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
6.heat - a preliminary race in which the winner advances to a more important race
race - a contest of speed; "the race is to the swift"
7.heat - utility to warm a buildingheat - utility to warm a building; "the heating system wasn't working"; "they have radiant heating"
boiler, steam boiler - sealed vessel where water is converted to steam
building, edifice - a structure that has a roof and walls and stands more or less permanently in one place; "there was a three-story building on the corner"; "it was an imposing edifice"
central heating - a heating system in which air or water is heated at a central furnace and sent through the building via vents or pipes and radiators
gas heat - heating system that burns natural gas
panel heating - heating system consisting of wall or floor or baseboard or ceiling panels containing electric conductors or heating pipes
radiator - heater consisting of a series of pipes for circulating steam or hot water to heat rooms or buildings
steam heat, steam heating - a heating system in which steam is generated in boilers and piped to radiators
utility - a facility composed of one or more pieces of equipment connected to or part of a structure and designed to provide a service such as heat or electricity or water or sewage disposal; "the price of the house included all utilities"
Verb1.heat - make hot or hotter; "the sun heats the oceans"; "heat the water on the stove"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
crispen, toast, crisp - make brown and crisp by heating; "toast bread"; "crisp potatoes"
scald - heat to the boiling point; "scald the milk"
soak - heat a metal prior to working it
calcine - heat a substance so that it oxidizes or reduces
preheat - heat beforehand; "Preheat the oven!"
overheat - make excessively or undesirably hot; "The room was overheated"
scorch, sear - make very hot and dry; "The heat scorched the countryside"
broil, bake - heat by a natural force; "The sun broils the valley in the summer"
reheat - heat again; "Please reheat the food from last night"
cool, cool down, chill - make cool or cooler; "Chill the food"
2.heat - provide with heat; "heat the house"
furnish, provide, supply, render - give something useful or necessary to; "We provided the room with an electrical heater"
steam-heat - heat by means of steam
3.heat - arouse or excite feelings and passionsheat - arouse or excite feelings and passions; "The ostentatious way of living of the rich ignites the hatred of the poor"; "The refugees' fate stirred up compassion around the world"; "Wake old feelings of hatred"
arouse, elicit, evoke, provoke, enkindle, kindle, fire, raise - call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses); "arouse pity"; "raise a smile"; "evoke sympathy"
ferment - work up into agitation or excitement; "Islam is fermenting Africa"
4.heat - gain heat or get hot; "The room heated up quickly"
change state, turn - undergo a transformation or a change of position or action; "We turned from Socialism to Capitalism"; "The people turned against the President when he stole the election"
overheat - get excessively and undesirably hot; "The car engines overheated"
fry - be excessively hot; "If the children stay out on the beach for another hour, they'll be fried"
cool, cool down, chill - loose heat; "The air cooled considerably after the thunderstorm"

heat

verb
1. (sometimes with up) warm (up), cook, fry, boil, roast, reheat, make hot Meanwhile, heat the tomatoes and oil in a pan.
warm (up) cool, freeze, chill, cool off
noun
1. warmth, hotness, temperature, swelter, sultriness, fieriness, torridity, warmness, calefaction leaves drooped in the fierce heat of the sun
warmth cold, coolness, coldness
2. hot weather, warmth, closeness, high temperature, heatwave, warm weather, hot climate, hot spell, mugginess The heat is killing me.
get heated up get excited, be stimulated, be stirred, become animated, be roused, be inflamed, be inspirited, become impassioned I get very heated up when people say that.
heat up
1. intensify, increase, heighten, deepen, escalate The war of words continues to heat up.
2. warm up, get hotter, become hot, rise in temperature, become warm, grow hot In the summer her mobile home heats up like an oven.
Related words
adjectives thermal, calorific
fear thermophobia
Proverbs
"If you can't stand the heat get out of the kitchen"

heat

noun
1. Intense warmth:
2. Intensity of feeling or reaction:
3. A regular period of sexual excitement in female mammals:
4. Slang. A member of a law-enforcement agency:
Informal: cop, law.
Slang: bull, copper, flatfoot, fuzz, gendarme, man (often uppercase).
Chiefly British: bobby, constable, peeler.
Translations
أكثر الأوقات حرارةًحَرَارَةحَرارَهسُخونَهغَضَب، إنْفِعال
ohřátteplovedrožárvzrušení
varmehedei kampens hedemiddagshedeophidselse
kuumuuslämmittäälämpöpaahtaapaine
grijatitoplinavrućina
forrósághõséghőség
æsing, ákafi; í hita augnabliksinsheitasti tími dagsinshitahitilota, undanrás
熱する
가열하다
atrankinės varžybosįsikarščiavimasįšiltikaitrakarščio banga
kaismekarstumspriekšsacīkstessakarsētsasildīt
ciepłoogrzaćpikantnośćcieczka
otepliť sa
vročina
värmavärme
ความร้อนทำให้ร้อน
ısıtmakısıısınmakkızgınlıköfke
đốt nóngnhiệt

heat

[hiːt]
A. N
1. (= warmth) → calor m (also heating) → calefacción f
in the heat of the dayen las horas de más calor
on or over a low heat (Culin) → a fuego lento
2. (fig) (= excitement) → calor m; (= vehemence) → vehemencia f; (= pressure) → presión f
in the heat of the moment/battleen el calor del momento/de la batalla
he replied with some heatcontestó bastante indignado or con bastante acaloramiento
when the heat is oncuando hay presión
it'll take the heat off usesto nos dará un respiro
to take the heat out of a situationreducir la tensión de una situación
to turn on the heatempezar a ejercer presión
the heat is onha llegado la hora de la verdad
we played well when the heat was ona la hora de la verdad supimos jugar bien (Pol) → crear un ambiente de crisis
3. (Sport) → prueba f (eliminatoria)
dead heatempate m
4. (Zool) [of dogs, cats] → celo m
to be in or on heat (Brit) → estar en celo
5. the heat (US) (= police) → la poli, la pasma (Sp) , la cana (S. Cone)
6. (US) (= criticism) he took a lot of heat for that mistakese llevó muchos palos por ese error
B. VT (= warm) → calentar
they heat their house with coalsu casa tiene calefacción de carbón
C. VIcalentarse
D. CPD heat exhaustion Nagotamiento m por el calor
heat haze Ncalina f, calima f
heat loss Npérdida f de calor
heat rash Nsarpullido m
heat shield Nescudo m contra el calor
heat treatment Ntratamiento m de calor
heat up
A. VI + ADV (lit) → calentarse (fig) [discussion, debate] → acalorarse
B. VT + ADV (gen) → calentar; [+ food] → calentar, recalentar

heat

[ˈhiːt]
n
[sun, fire, flame] → chaleur f
I find the heat unbearable → Je ne supporte pas cette chaleur.
(fig) (= excitement) → ardeur f
in the heat of the election campaign → dans le feu de la campagne électorale
in the heat of the moment → dans le feu de l'action
[cooker, hotplate] → feu m
on a medium heat → à feu moyen
(SPORT) (also qualifying heat) → éliminatoire f
(ZOOLOGY) on heat (British) in heat (US)en chaleur
vt
[+ room, house, water] → chauffer
[person] [+ food] → faire chauffer
Heat gently for 5 minutes → Faire chauffer à feu doux pendant cinq minutes.
heat up
vi
[liquid] → chauffer
The water is heating up → L'eau chauffe.
[room] → se réchauffer
(fig) (= become more intense) → s'intensifier, gagner en intensité
vt
[+ building, room] → réchauffer
[+ food] → faire réchauffer
He heated the soup up → Il a fait réchauffer la soupe.

heat

n
Hitze f; (pleasant, Phys) → Wärme f; (of curry etc)Schärfe f; (= heating)Heizung f; I don’t mind the heatmir macht (die) Hitze nichts aus; in the heat of the daywenn es heiß ist; on or over (a) low heatbei schwacher Hitze; to regulate the heat (in oven) → die Hitze regulieren; (on fire) → die Wärme regulieren
(fig, of argument, discussion) → Hitze f; in the heat of the momentin der Hitze des Gefechts; (when upset) → in der Erregung; the discussion generated quite a lot of heatdie Diskussion erhitzte die Gemüter; to take the heat out of the situation/an argumentdie Situation/Diskussion entschärfen; with some heat (say, debate)hitzig; in the heat of the election campaignin der Aufregung des Wahlkampfs
(inf: = pressure) → Druck m; to put the heat onDruck machen (inf); to turn up the heat on somebodyjdm die Hölle heißmachen (inf); the heat is on nowwir/sie etc stehen jetzt unter enormem Druck; the heat is offder Druck ist weg (inf); (= danger is past)die Gefahr ist vorbei
(Sport) → Vorlauf m; (Boxing etc) → Vorkampf m; final heatFinale nt
(Zool) → Brunst f; (Hunt) → Brunft f; (of dogs, cats)Läufigkeit f; on (Brit) or in (esp US) heatbrünstig; (Hunt) → brunftig; (dog, cat)läufig, heiß; (inf: person) → heiß (inf)
vterhitzen; food alsoaufwärmen, heiß or warm machen; house, roomheizen; poolbeheizen; (= provide with heat) house, townbeheizen
vi (room etc)sich erwärmen, warm werden; (get very hot) → sich erhitzen, heiß werden; your dinner is heating in the ovendein Essen steht (im Backofen) warm

heat

:
heat exchanger
nWärme(aus)tauscher m
heat exhaustion
nHitzeschäden pl
heat flash
nHitzeblitz m

heat

:
heat lightning
heat loss
heatproof
heat pump
nWärmepumpe f
heat rash
nHitzeausschlag m, → Hitzepocken pl
heat recovery
heat-resistant
heat-seeking
adjWärme suchend
heat-sensitive
heat shield
n (for protection) → Hitzeschild m; (to retain heat) → Wärmeschutz m
heat spot
n (Brit) → Hitzebläschen nt
heatstroke
nHitzschlag m
heat treatment
n (Metal, Med) → Wärmebehandlung f
heat wave
nHitzewelle f

heat

[hiːt]
1. n
a. (gen) → calore m; (fig) → ardore m
I can't stand the heat → non sopporto il caldo
at low heat (Culin) (on stove) → a fuoco basso; (in oven) → a calore moderato
in the heat of the moment (fig) → nella foga del momento
in the heat of the battle → nella furia della battaglia
to put the heat on sb → fare pressione a or su qn
he replied with some heat → rispose piuttosto irritato
b. (Sport) (also qualifying heat) → batteria, prova eliminatoria
c. (Zool) in or on heatin calore
2. vt(far) scaldare
3. viscaldarsi
heat up
1. vi + adv (liquids) → scaldarsi; (room) → riscaldarsi
2. vt + advriscaldare

heat

(hiːt) noun
1. the amount of hotness (of something), especially of things which are very hot. Test the heat of the water before you bath the baby.
2. the warmth from something which is hot. The heat from the fire will dry your coat; the effect of heat on metal; the heat of the sun.
3. the hottest time. the heat of the day.
4. anger or excitement. He didn't mean to be rude – he just said that in the heat of the moment.
5. in a sports competition etc, one of two or more contests from which the winners go on to take part in later stages of the competition. Having won his heat he is going through to the final.
verb
(sometimes with up) to make or become hot or warm. We'll heat (up) the soup; The day heats up quickly once the sun has risen.
ˈheated adjective
1. having been made hot. a heated swimming-pool.
2. showing anger, excitement etc. a heated argument.
ˈheatedly adverb
ˈheatedness noun
ˈheater noun
an apparatus which gives out heat in order to warm a room etc, or which heats water etc eg in a water-tank.
ˈheating noun
the system of heaters etc which heat a room, building etc. We turn the heating off in the summer.
heat wave
a period of very hot weather.
in/on heat
(of female animals) in a condition for mating.

see also hot.

heat

حَرَارَة, يُسَخِّنُ ohřát, teplo opvarme, varme heizen, Hitze θερμαίνω, θερμότητα calentar, calor kuumuus, lämmittää chaleur, chauffer grijati, vrućina calore, riscaldare, 熱する 가열하다, 열 hitte, verhitten varme ciepło, ogrzać aquecer, calor жара, нагревать värma, värme ความร้อน, ทำให้ร้อน ısı, ısıtmak đốt nóng, nhiệt 供热,

heat

n. calor;
conductive ______ de conducción;
dry ______ seco;
___ crampsespasmo muscular (debido a trabajos realizados en altas temperaturas);
___ exhaustioncolapso por calor;
___ losspérdida de ___;
___ prostrationinsolación con colapso;
___ sensitivesensible al calor;
___ stabletermoestable;
___ strokeinsolación;
___ unitcaloría;
___ therapytermoterapia;
to be in ___estar en celo;
v. calentar; dar calor.

heat

n calor m; body — calor corporal; vt (también to — up) calentar
References in classic literature ?
But the letter telling that Beth was failing never reached Amy, and when the next found her at Vevay, for the heat had driven them from Nice in May, and they had travelled slowly to Switzerland, by way of Genoa and the Italian lakes.
The thunder continued to rumble and flashes of heat lightning lit up the eastern sky.
It really was not unpleasant traveling, aside from the heat.
LAST summer I happened to be crossing the plains of Iowa in a season of intense heat, and it was my good fortune to have for a traveling companion James Quayle Burden--Jim Burden, as we still call him in the West.
The rays of the sun were beginning to grow less fierce, and the intense heat of the day was lessened, as the cooler vapors of the springs and fountains rose above their leafy beds, and rested in the atmosphere.
This strange act was perfectly understood by the group, who knew that in that intensely dry heat the danger of exposure was lessened by active exercise and the profuse perspiration that followed it.
Her usually pale cheeks were all ablaze with heat and hurry.
It was pleasant in the summer forenoons -- when the fervent heat, that almost liquefied the rest of the human family, merely communicated a genial warmth to their half torpid systems -- it was pleasant to hear them chatting in the back entry, a row of them all tipped against the wall, as usual; while the frozen witticisms of past generations were thawed out, and came bubbling with laughter from their lips.
Presently, after many hasty snatches into the fire, and still hastier withdrawals of his fingers (whereby he seemed to be scorching them badly), he at last succeeded in drawing out the biscuit; then blowing off the heat and ashes a little, he made a polite offer of it to the little negro.
At last I reached my own box, and had some corn; and after Robert had wrapped up my knees in wet cloths, he tied up my foot in a bran poultice, to draw out the heat and cleanse it before the horse-doctor saw it in the morning, and I managed to get myself down on the straw, and slept in spite of the pain.
There was no heat upon the killing beds; the men might exactly as well have worked out of doors all winter.
The snatches of conversation which he had caught between Christine and the monster had contributed not a little to drive him beside himself: add to that the shock of the magic forest and the scorching heat which was beginning to make the prespiration{sic} stream down his temples and you will have no difficulty in understanding his state of mind.