heat-island

heat-island

n
(Physical Geography) meteorol the mass of air over a large city, characteristically having a slightly higher average temperature than that of the surrounding air
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Every city has hundreds of acres of flat, black tar roofs, creating a heat-island effect, which causes urban areas to get hotter than rural landscapes.
Light-coloured roofing and outdoor surfaces, reducing the heat-island effect by reflecting sunlight and heat.
Legendary climatologist Arthur Rosenfeld recently told the website SolveClimate that painting roofs white in cities could help reduce the urban heat-island effect.
Some merits to the buildings covered with moss are: alleviation of urban heat-island phenomena, cost reduction in air conditioning due to the heat shielding effects of the moss and its ability to absorb carbon dioxide, and prevention of concrete degradation by shielding it from ultra-violet and infrared rays.
Kirsch Pink, which bears pink flowers between May and November, also eases the urban heat-island effect by 1.
Select a highly reflective, light-colored roof to reduce the heat-island effect.
In addition to these benefits, Greg Crawford, vice president of operations for the Steel Recycling Institure, Pittsburgh, says steel roofing is also considered "cool roofing" by LEED, meaning it reduces the heat-island effect of roofing in urban areas with its reflective effect or light colors.
Other factors contributing to this heat-island effect include heat emitted by industrial activity, gasoline combustion in the city's automobiles, and the use of utilities such as electricity and natural gas.
Melhuish and Pedder, 1998; Pinho and Manso-Orgaz, 2000) recently demonstrated that medium-sized and small urban areas may also be responsible for heat-island effects.
Even without global warming, Phoenix has been the poster child for what's known as the heat-island effect.
Garlands Starburst mineral provides 50 to 60% reflectivity, which can decrease rooftop temperatures to about 1200 F, significantly reducing urban heat-island effect and extending the working life of the roof.
Interestingly, older high-rise projects like the Sunshine 60 complex in Ikebukuro, are situated at the epicenter of a locus of flyovers, shops and a residential warren consisting of many wood, tile and mortar houses vulnerable to the damp and decay that characterizes Tokyo's heat-island summers.