heave


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Related to heave: heave ho, Heave offering

heave

 (hēv)
v. heaved, heav·ing, heaves
v.tr.
1. To raise or lift, especially with great effort or force: heaved the box of books onto the table. See Synonyms at lift.
2.
a. To throw (a heavy object) with great effort; hurl: heave the shot; heaved a brick through the window.
b. To throw or toss: heaved his backpack into the corner.
3. To give out or utter with effort or pain: heaved a sigh; heaved a groan.
4. To vomit (something).
5. past tense and past participle hove (hōv) Nautical
a. To raise or haul up by means of a rope, line, or cable: hove the anchor up and set sail.
b. To move (a ship) in a certain direction or into a certain position by hauling: hove the ship astern.
6. To make rise or swell: the wind heaving huge waves; an exhausted dog heaving its chest.
7. Geology To displace or move (a vein, lode, or stratum, for example).
v.intr.
1. To rise up or swell, as if pushed up; bulge: The sidewalk froze and heaved.
2. To rise and fall in turn, as waves.
3. To gag or vomit.
4. To pant; gasp: heave for air.
5. past tense and past participle hove Nautical
a. To move in a certain direction or to a specified position: The frigate hove alongside.
b. To pull at or haul a rope or cable: The brig is heaving around on the anchor.
c. To push at a capstan bar or lever.
n.
1. The act or effort of raising or lifting something: with a great heave hauled the fish onto the deck.
2. An act of hurling; a throw, especially when considered in terms of distance: a heave of 63 feet.
3. Geology
a. A horizontal dislocation, as of a rock stratum, at a fault.
b. An upward movement of a surface, especially when caused by swelling and expansion of clay, removal of overburden, or freezing of subsurface water.
4. An upward movement, especially of a ship or aircraft.
5. The act or an instance of gagging or vomiting.
6. heaves (used with a sing. or pl. verb) A pulmonary disease of horses that is characterized by respiratory irregularities, such as coughing, and is noticeable especially after exercise or in cold weather.
Phrasal Verb:
heave to Nautical
1. To turn a sailing ship so that its bow heads into the wind and the ship lies motionless except for drifting, in order to meet a storm: The brig hove to.
2. To turn an engine-powered vessel in a similar situation so that its bow heads into the seas while proceeding at low speed.
Idiom:
heave into sight/view
To rise or seem to rise over the horizon into view, as a ship.

[Middle English heven, from Old English hebban; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

heav′er n.

heave

(hiːv)
vb, heaves, heaving or heaved, hove
1. (tr) to lift or move with a great effort
2. (tr) to throw (something heavy) with effort
3. to utter (sounds, sighs, etc) or breathe noisily or unhappily: to heave a sigh.
4. to rise and fall or cause to rise and fall heavily
5. (Nautical Terms) (past tense and past participle hove) nautical
a. to move or cause to move in a specified way, direction, or position: to heave in sight.
b. (intr) (of a vessel) to pitch or roll
6. (Geological Science) (tr) to displace (rock strata, mineral veins, etc) in a horizontal direction
7. (Medicine) (intr) to retch
n
8. the act or an instance of heaving
9. a fling
10. (Geological Science) the horizontal displacement of rock strata at a fault
[Old English hebban; related to Old Norse hefja, Old Saxon hebbian, Old High German heffen to raise, Latin capere to take, Sanskrit kapatī two hands full]
ˈheaver n

heave

(hiv)

v. heaved (esp. Naut.) hove; heav•ing; v.t.
1. to raise or lift with effort or force; hoist: to heave a heavy ax.
2. to throw, esp. to lift and throw with effort or force: to heave a stone through a window.
3. Naut. to move into a certain position or situation.
4. to utter laboriously or painfully: to heave a sigh.
5. to cause to rise and fall with a swelling motion: to heave one's chest.
6. to vomit; throw up.
7. to haul or pull on (a rope, cable, line, etc.).
v.i.
8. to rise and fall in rhythmically alternate movements: The ship heaved and rolled.
9. to breathe with effort; pant.
10. to vomit; retch.
11. to rise as if thrust up, as a hill; swell or bulge.
12. to pull or haul on a rope, cable, etc.
13. Naut. to move in a certain direction or into a certain position or situation: The ship hove into sight.
14. heave to,
a. to stop the headway of (a vessel), esp. by bringing the head to the wind and trimming the sails.
b. to come to a halt.
n.
15. an act or effort of heaving.
16. a throw, toss, or cast.
17. the horizontal component of the apparent displacement resulting from a geologic fault, measured in a vertical plane perpendicular to the strike.
18. the rise and fall of the waves or swell of a sea.
19. heaves, (used with a sing. v.) Also called broken wind. a disease of horses characterized by difficult breathing.
Idioms:
heave ho! (an exclamation used by sailors, as when heaving the anchor up.)
[before 900; Middle English heven, variant (with -v- from preterit and past participle) of hebben, Old English hebban, c. Old Saxon hebbian, Old High German heffen, Old Norse hefja, Gothic hafjan]
heav′er, n.

heave


Past participle: heaved/hove
Gerund: heaving

Imperative
heave
heave
Present
I heave
you heave
he/she/it heaves
we heave
you heave
they heave
Preterite
I heaved
you heaved
he/she/it heaved
we heaved
you heaved
they heaved
Present Continuous
I am heaving
you are heaving
he/she/it is heaving
we are heaving
you are heaving
they are heaving
Present Perfect
I have heaved/hove
you have heaved/hove
he/she/it has heaved/hove
we have heaved/hove
you have heaved/hove
they have heaved/hove
Past Continuous
I was heaving
you were heaving
he/she/it was heaving
we were heaving
you were heaving
they were heaving
Past Perfect
I had heaved/hove
you had heaved/hove
he/she/it had heaved/hove
we had heaved/hove
you had heaved/hove
they had heaved/hove
Future
I will heave
you will heave
he/she/it will heave
we will heave
you will heave
they will heave
Future Perfect
I will have heaved/hove
you will have heaved/hove
he/she/it will have heaved/hove
we will have heaved/hove
you will have heaved/hove
they will have heaved/hove
Future Continuous
I will be heaving
you will be heaving
he/she/it will be heaving
we will be heaving
you will be heaving
they will be heaving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been heaving
you have been heaving
he/she/it has been heaving
we have been heaving
you have been heaving
they have been heaving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been heaving
you will have been heaving
he/she/it will have been heaving
we will have been heaving
you will have been heaving
they will have been heaving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been heaving
you had been heaving
he/she/it had been heaving
we had been heaving
you had been heaving
they had been heaving
Conditional
I would heave
you would heave
he/she/it would heave
we would heave
you would heave
they would heave
Past Conditional
I would have heaved/hove
you would have heaved/hove
he/she/it would have heaved/hove
we would have heaved/hove
you would have heaved/hove
they would have heaved/hove
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heave - an upward movement (especially a rhythmical rising and falling); "the heaving of waves on a rough sea"
rising, ascension, ascent, rise - a movement upward; "they cheered the rise of the hot-air balloon"
2.heave - (geology) a horizontal dislocation
geology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocks
motion, movement - a natural event that involves a change in the position or location of something
3.heave - the act of lifting something with great effort
ascending, rise, ascent, ascension - the act of changing location in an upward direction
4.heave - an involuntary spasm of ineffectual vomiting; "a bad case of the heaves"
spasm - (pathology) sudden constriction of a hollow organ (as a blood vessel)
5.heave - the act of raising something; "he responded with a lift of his eyebrow"; "fireman learn several different raises for getting ladders up"
actuation, propulsion - the act of propelling
6.heave - throwing something heavy (with great effort); "he gave it a mighty heave"; "he was not good at heaving passes"
throw - the act of throwing (propelling something with a rapid movement of the arm and wrist); "the catcher made a good throw to second base"
Verb1.heave - utter a sound, as with obvious effort; "She heaved a deep sigh when she saw the list of things to do"
let loose, let out, utter, emit - express audibly; utter sounds (not necessarily words); "She let out a big heavy sigh"; "He uttered strange sounds that nobody could understand"
2.heave - throw with great effort
throw - propel through the air; "throw a frisbee"
3.heave - rise and move, as in waves or billowsheave - rise and move, as in waves or billows; "The army surged forward"
inflate, blow up - fill with gas or air; "inflate a balloons"
4.heave - lift or elevate
upheave - lift forcefully from beneath
weigh anchor, weigh the anchor - heave up an anchor in preparation for sailing
lift - take hold of something and move it to a different location; "lift the box onto the table"
5.heave - move or cause to move in a specified way, direction, or position; "The vessel hove into sight"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
6.heave - breathe noisily, as when one is exhausted; "The runners reached the finish line, panting heavily"
blow - exhale hard; "blow on the soup to cool it down"
7.heave - bend out of shape, as under pressure or from heat; "The highway buckled during the heat wave"
change surface - undergo or cause to undergo a change in the surface
lift - rise upward, as from pressure or moisture; "The floor is lifting slowly"
8.heave - make an unsuccessful effort to vomit; strain to vomit

heave

verb
1. lift, raise, pull (up), drag (up), haul (up), tug, lever, hoist, heft (informal) He heaved Barney to his feet.
2. throw, fling, toss, send, cast, pitch, hurl, sling Heave a brick at the telly.
3. expand, rise, swell, pant, throb, exhale, dilate, palpitate His chest heaved, and he took a deep breath.
4. surge, rise, swell, billow The grey seas heaved.
5. vomit, be sick, throw up (informal), chuck (up) (slang, chiefly U.S.), chuck (Austral. & N.Z. informal), gag, spew, retch, barf (U.S. slang), chunder (slang, chiefly Austral.), upchuck (U.S. slang), do a technicolour yawn (slang), toss your cookies (U.S. slang) He gasped and heaved and vomited.
6. breathe, sigh, puff, groan, sob, breathe heavily, suspire (archaic), utter wearily Mr Collier heaved a sigh and got to his feet.

heave

verb
1. To move (something) to a higher position:
2. To move vigorously from side to side or up and down:
3. To send through the air with a motion of the hand or arm:
Informal: fire.
4. To utter in a breathless manner:
5. To eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth:
Slang: puke.
noun
1. An instance of lifting or being lifted:
2. An act of throwing:
Translations
رَفْعَهيَرْتَفِع ويَنْخَفِضيَرْفَع شيئا ثَقيلايَقْذِف
dmutíhoditnadzvedávatnáporzvednout
hæve sighivekasteløftløfte
megemelkedik
bylgjasthífa, lyftakastalyfting, átak
atsidustibangavimaskilnotispakėlimastrūktelėjimas
bangošanāsbangotcelšanaceltcilāt
atmaatmakfırlatmakaldırmakşiddetle yerinden oynatmak

heave

[hiːv]
A. N (= lift) → gran esfuerzo m (para levantar ); (= pull) → tirón m, jalón m (LAm) (on de) (= push) → empujón m; (= throw) → echada f, tirada f; (= movement) [of waves, sea] → sube y baja m
with a heave of his shoulderscon un fuerte movimiento de hombros
B. VT (= pull) → tirar, jalar (LAm); (= drag) → arrastrar; (= carry) → llevar; (= lift) → levantar (con dificultad); (= push) → empujar; (= throw) → lanzar, tirar
they heaved the body off the clifflanzaron or tiraron el cuerpo por el acantilado
he heaved himself to a sitting positionse incorporó con gran esfuerzo
to heave a sighdar or echar un suspiro, suspirar
to heave a sigh of reliefsuspirar aliviado
C. VI
1. (= rise and fall) [water etc] → subir y bajar; [chest, bosom] → palpitar
2. (= pull) → tirar, jalar (LAm) (at, on de)
3. (= retch) → hacer arcadas
her stomach was heavingle daban arcadas, se le revolvía el estómago
it makes me heaveme da asco
4. (Naut) (hove (pt, pp)) (= move) → virar; (= pitch) → cabecear; (= roll) → balancearse
to heave in(to) sightaparecer
heave to VI + ADVponerse al pairo
heave up VT + ADV [vomit] → devolver, arrojar

heave

[ˈhiːv]
vt
(= lift) → soulever (avec effort)
to heave sth/sb into sth → soulever qch/qn pour le mettre dans qch(la)
to heave sth/sb onto sth → soulever qch/qn pour le mettre sur qch(la)
to heave o.s. up → se lever avec effort
to heave a sigh → pousser un gros soupir
to heave a sigh of relief → pousser un gros soupir de soulagement
vi
(= move up and down) [chest] → se soulever; [stomach] → se soulever
(= retch) → avoir des haut-le-cœur
to heave into view, to heave into sight (= appear) → apparaître
n (= effort) → effort m

heave

vt
(= lift)(hoch)hieven, (hoch)heben, wuchten (→ onto auf +acc); (= drag)schleppen; he heaved himself out of beder hievte sich aus dem Bett (inf); she heaved him to his feetsie wuchtete ihn auf die Beine
(= throw)werfen, schmeißen (inf)
sigh, sobausstoßen
pret, ptp <hove> (Naut) → wenden; to heave anchorden Anker lichten
vi
(= pull)ziehen, hieven
(= move: ground) → sich heben und senken; (sea, waves, bosom)wogen (geh); (stomach)sich umdrehen; (body)sich krümmen; the earthquake made the ground heavebei dem Beben hob sich die Erde
pret, ptp <hove> (Naut) to heave into sight or viewin Sicht kommen; to heave alongsidelängsseits gehen
n (of sea, waves)Auf und Ab nt, → Wogen nt (geh); (of bosom, chest)Wogen nt (geh); to lift/throw something with a great heaveetw mit großer Anstrengung hochhieven or hochwuchten/mit großer Wucht werfen

heave

[hiːv]
1. nsforzo; (of waves) → movimento (Geol) → rigetto
2. vt (pull) → tirare con forza; (drag) → trascinare a fatica; (lift) → sollevare a fatica; (throw) → scagliare
to heave a sigh → emettere or mandare un sospiro
to heave a sigh of relief → tirare un sospiro di sollievo
to heave anchor (Naut) → salpare l'ancora
3. vi
a. (sea, chest, stomach) → alzarsi ed abbassarsi
to heave at or to heave on (pull) → tirare con forza
he heaved with all his might → ha tirato con tutta la sua forza
b. (feel sick) → avere i conati di vomito
her stomach heaved → le si rivoltò lo stomaco
c. (hove (liter: pt, pp)) to heave in sight or into viewcomparire all'orizzonte
heave to (hove (pt, pp)) vi + adv (Naut) → navigare in cappa

heave

(hiːv) verb
1. to (try to) lift or to pull, with great effort. They heaved with all their strength, but could not move the rock; They heaved the wardrobe up into the lorry.
2. to throw (something heavy). Someone heaved a stone through my window.
3. to rise, or rise and fall again several times. The earthquake made the ground heave.
noun
the act of heaving. He gave one heave and the rock moved; the heave of the waves.
heave a sigh
to sigh. He heaved a sigh of relief when he reached safety.
heave to (houv) past tense, past participle hove
– (of a ship) to (cause to) stop while at sea. The ship hove to.
References in classic literature ?
that great sigh, which you made me heave, has burst off the very last of them
There was a kind of support in the shy heave of her surprise.
Is that the way they heave in the marchant service?
Well, it was noble to see Launcelot and the boys swarm up onto that scaffold and heave sheriffs and such overboard.
Then her breast began to heave, the tears came, and in her forlornness she was moved to try that other dream of hers-- an appeal to her boy's charity; and so, upon the impulse, and without reflection, she offered her supplication:
would she drop one little tear upon his poor, lifeless form, would she heave one little sigh to see a bright young life so rudely blight- ed, so untimely cut down?
He would come, and we would heave him overboard, or get killed trying.
Now you watch me heave this newspaper right onto Mis' Brown's doorstep.
He stood by the fire, his back towards me, just finishing a stormy scene with poor Zillah; who ever and anon interrupted her labour to pluck up the corner of her apron, and heave an indignant groan.
Other sound than the owl's voice there was none, save the failing of a fountain into its stone basin; for, it was one of those dark nights that hold their breath by the hour together, and then heave a long low sigh, and hold their breath again.