heaver


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Related to heaver: heavier

heave

 (hēv)
v. heaved, heav·ing, heaves
v.tr.
1. To raise or lift, especially with great effort or force: heaved the box of books onto the table. See Synonyms at lift.
2.
a. To throw (a heavy object) with great effort; hurl: heave the shot; heaved a brick through the window.
b. To throw or toss: heaved his backpack into the corner.
3. To give out or utter with effort or pain: heaved a sigh; heaved a groan.
4. To vomit (something).
5. past tense and past participle hove (hōv) Nautical
a. To raise or haul up by means of a rope, line, or cable: hove the anchor up and set sail.
b. To move (a ship) in a certain direction or into a certain position by hauling: hove the ship astern.
6. To make rise or swell: the wind heaving huge waves; an exhausted dog heaving its chest.
7. Geology To displace or move (a vein, lode, or stratum, for example).
v.intr.
1. To rise up or swell, as if pushed up; bulge: The sidewalk froze and heaved.
2. To rise and fall in turn, as waves.
3. To gag or vomit.
4. To pant; gasp: heave for air.
5. past tense and past participle hove Nautical
a. To move in a certain direction or to a specified position: The frigate hove alongside.
b. To pull at or haul a rope or cable: The brig is heaving around on the anchor.
c. To push at a capstan bar or lever.
n.
1. The act or effort of raising or lifting something: with a great heave hauled the fish onto the deck.
2. An act of hurling; a throw, especially when considered in terms of distance: a heave of 63 feet.
3. Geology
a. A horizontal dislocation, as of a rock stratum, at a fault.
b. An upward movement of a surface, especially when caused by swelling and expansion of clay, removal of overburden, or freezing of subsurface water.
4. An upward movement, especially of a ship or aircraft.
5. The act or an instance of gagging or vomiting.
6. heaves(used with a sing. or pl. verb) See recurrent airway obstruction.
Phrasal Verb:
heave to Nautical
1. To turn a sailing ship so that its bow heads into the wind and the ship lies motionless except for drifting, as to meet a storm: The brig hove to.
2. To turn an engine-powered vessel in a similar situation so that its bow heads into the seas while proceeding at low speed.
Idiom:
heave into sight/view
To rise or seem to rise over the horizon into view, as a ship.

[Middle English heven, from Old English hebban; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

heav′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heaver - a bar used as a lever (as in twisting rope)
bar - a rigid piece of metal or wood; usually used as a fastening or obstruction or weapon; "there were bars in the windows to prevent escape"
2.heaver - a workman who heaves freight or bulk goods (especially at a dockyard)
working man, working person, workingman, workman - an employee who performs manual or industrial labor
References in classic literature ?
Then, the crowds for ever passing and repassing on the bridges (on those which are free of toil at last), where many stop on fine evenings looking listlessly down upon the water with some vague idea that by and by it runs between green banks which grow wider and wider until at last it joins the broad vast sea--where some halt to rest from heavy loads and think as they look over the parapet that to smoke and lounge away one's life, and lie sleeping in the sun upon a hot tarpaulin, in a dull, slow, sluggish barge, must be happiness unalloyed--and where some, and a very different class, pause with heaver loads than they, remembering to have heard or read in old time that drowning was not a hard death, but of all means of suicide the easiest and best.
The heavers forward now resume their song, and while the one tackle is peeling and hoisting a second strip from the whale, the other is slowly slackened away, and down goes the first strip through the main hatchway right beneath, into an unfurnished parlor called the blubber-room.
Some were in rags, with black faces, like coal- heavers, like sweeps, and had bullet heads that seemed closely cropped, but were in fact singed to the skin.
The exceptional brass ensemble made up of CSO musicians Gareth Griffiths and Andreas Giannakouras (trumpets) and Kelly Alijani and Catherine Heaver (French horns), will take us on an exciting musical journey under the title From Renaissance to 20th Century with works from the renaissance and baroque periods as well as contemporary works.
COVENTRY Stadium Operations Manager Jeremy Heaver says Brandon will close at the end of the next season.
Edwards won the mixed fours with Jo Rolls, Geoff Heath and Jason Heaver.
Dale Heaver, 19, of Cemetery Road in Dewsbury, and Kayleigh Rock, 18, of Robar in Dewsbury, were before Kirklees Magistrates' Court.
The pair exchanged blows, leaving Mr Heaver with a fractured cheekbone, before peacemakers rushed to separate them.
He used to be known as Mark Heaver and got 13 years for paying hit men to kill a rival in a Merseyside turf war between boxing promoters.
aith or ause of to have ircle" us and ently She said: "I only gained when I was pregnant and I'm 23lbs still 10lbs heaver than I was budon't want to kill myself trying get back into shape.