heaving


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heave

 (hēv)
v. heaved, heav·ing, heaves
v.tr.
1. To raise or lift, especially with great effort or force: heaved the box of books onto the table. See Synonyms at lift.
2.
a. To throw (a heavy object) with great effort; hurl: heave the shot; heaved a brick through the window.
b. To throw or toss: heaved his backpack into the corner.
3. To give out or utter with effort or pain: heaved a sigh; heaved a groan.
4. To vomit (something).
5. past tense and past participle hove (hōv) Nautical
a. To raise or haul up by means of a rope, line, or cable: hove the anchor up and set sail.
b. To move (a ship) in a certain direction or into a certain position by hauling: hove the ship astern.
6. To make rise or swell: the wind heaving huge waves; an exhausted dog heaving its chest.
7. Geology To displace or move (a vein, lode, or stratum, for example).
v.intr.
1. To rise up or swell, as if pushed up; bulge: The sidewalk froze and heaved.
2. To rise and fall in turn, as waves.
3. To gag or vomit.
4. To pant; gasp: heave for air.
5. past tense and past participle hove Nautical
a. To move in a certain direction or to a specified position: The frigate hove alongside.
b. To pull at or haul a rope or cable: The brig is heaving around on the anchor.
c. To push at a capstan bar or lever.
n.
1. The act or effort of raising or lifting something: with a great heave hauled the fish onto the deck.
2. An act of hurling; a throw, especially when considered in terms of distance: a heave of 63 feet.
3. Geology
a. A horizontal dislocation, as of a rock stratum, at a fault.
b. An upward movement of a surface, especially when caused by swelling and expansion of clay, removal of overburden, or freezing of subsurface water.
4. An upward movement, especially of a ship or aircraft.
5. The act or an instance of gagging or vomiting.
6. heaves(used with a sing. or pl. verb) See recurrent airway obstruction.
Phrasal Verb:
heave to Nautical
1. To turn a sailing ship so that its bow heads into the wind and the ship lies motionless except for drifting, as to meet a storm: The brig hove to.
2. To turn an engine-powered vessel in a similar situation so that its bow heads into the seas while proceeding at low speed.
Idiom:
heave into sight/view
To rise or seem to rise over the horizon into view, as a ship.

[Middle English heven, from Old English hebban; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

heav′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heaving - an upward movement (especially a rhythmical rising and falling); "the heaving of waves on a rough sea"
rising, ascension, ascent, rise - a movement upward; "they cheered the rise of the hot-air balloon"
2.heaving - breathing heavily (as after exertion)heaving - breathing heavily (as after exertion)
breathing, external respiration, respiration, ventilation - the bodily process of inhalation and exhalation; the process of taking in oxygen from inhaled air and releasing carbon dioxide by exhalation
3.heaving - the act of lifting something with great effort
ascending, rise, ascent, ascension - the act of changing location in an upward direction
4.heaving - throwing something heavy (with great effort); "he gave it a mighty heave"; "he was not good at heaving passes"
throw - the act of throwing (propelling something with a rapid movement of the arm and wrist); "the catcher made a good throw to second base"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
The lineaments of the quivering features of Magua proved more ductile; his countenance gradually lost its character of defiance in an expression of ferocious joy, and heaving a breath from the very bottom of his chest, he pronounced aloud the formidable name of:
Well," said Hepzibah, heaving a deep sigh, "perhaps I had
But it will calm the swell and heaving of thy passion, like oil thrown on the waves of a tempestuous sea.
very benevolent countenance then; but how hard he breathes, he's heaving himself; get off, Queequeg, you are heavy, it's grinding the face of the poor.