heaving


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heave

 (hēv)
v. heaved, heav·ing, heaves
v.tr.
1. To raise or lift, especially with great effort or force: heaved the box of books onto the table. See Synonyms at lift.
2.
a. To throw (a heavy object) with great effort; hurl: heave the shot; heaved a brick through the window.
b. To throw or toss: heaved his backpack into the corner.
3. To give out or utter with effort or pain: heaved a sigh; heaved a groan.
4. To vomit (something).
5. past tense and past participle hove (hōv) Nautical
a. To raise or haul up by means of a rope, line, or cable: hove the anchor up and set sail.
b. To move (a ship) in a certain direction or into a certain position by hauling: hove the ship astern.
6. To make rise or swell: the wind heaving huge waves; an exhausted dog heaving its chest.
7. Geology To displace or move (a vein, lode, or stratum, for example).
v.intr.
1. To rise up or swell, as if pushed up; bulge: The sidewalk froze and heaved.
2. To rise and fall in turn, as waves.
3. To gag or vomit.
4. To pant; gasp: heave for air.
5. past tense and past participle hove Nautical
a. To move in a certain direction or to a specified position: The frigate hove alongside.
b. To pull at or haul a rope or cable: The brig is heaving around on the anchor.
c. To push at a capstan bar or lever.
n.
1. The act or effort of raising or lifting something: with a great heave hauled the fish onto the deck.
2. An act of hurling; a throw, especially when considered in terms of distance: a heave of 63 feet.
3. Geology
a. A horizontal dislocation, as of a rock stratum, at a fault.
b. An upward movement of a surface, especially when caused by swelling and expansion of clay, removal of overburden, or freezing of subsurface water.
4. An upward movement, especially of a ship or aircraft.
5. The act or an instance of gagging or vomiting.
6. heaves(used with a sing. or pl. verb) See recurrent airway obstruction.
Phrasal Verb:
heave to Nautical
1. To turn a sailing ship so that its bow heads into the wind and the ship lies motionless except for drifting, as to meet a storm: The brig hove to.
2. To turn an engine-powered vessel in a similar situation so that its bow heads into the seas while proceeding at low speed.
Idiom:
heave into sight/view
To rise or seem to rise over the horizon into view, as a ship.

[Middle English heven, from Old English hebban; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

heav′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heaving - an upward movement (especially a rhythmical rising and falling); "the heaving of waves on a rough sea"
rising, ascension, ascent, rise - a movement upward; "they cheered the rise of the hot-air balloon"
2.heaving - breathing heavily (as after exertion)heaving - breathing heavily (as after exertion)
breathing, external respiration, respiration, ventilation - the bodily process of inhalation and exhalation; the process of taking in oxygen from inhaled air and releasing carbon dioxide by exhalation
3.heaving - the act of lifting something with great effort
ascending, rise, ascent, ascension - the act of changing location in an upward direction
4.heaving - throwing something heavy (with great effort); "he gave it a mighty heave"; "he was not good at heaving passes"
throw - the act of throwing (propelling something with a rapid movement of the arm and wrist); "the catcher made a good throw to second base"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
And all this seemed natural enough; especially as in the merchant service many captains never show themselves on deck for a considerable time after heaving up the anchor, but remain over the cabin table, having a farewell merrymaking with their shore friends, before they quit the ship for good with the pilot.
Dan's line was out long before Harvey had mastered the mystery of baiting and heaving out the leads.
During all this time the ship lay rolling in the trough of the sea, the heavy surges breaking over her, and the spars heaving and banging to and fro, bruising the half-drowned sailors that clung to the bowsprit and the stumps of the masts.