heavy-handed

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heav·y-hand·ed

(hĕv′ē-hăn′dĭd)
adj.
1. Clumsy; awkward.
2. Tactless; indiscreet.
3. Oppressive; harsh.

heav′y-hand′ed·ness n.

heavy-handed

adj
1. clumsy
2. harsh and oppressive
ˌheavy-ˈhandedly adv
ˌheavy-ˈhandedness n

heav′y-hand′ed



adj.
1. clumsy; graceless.
2. oppressive; harsh.
[1625–35]
heav′y-hand′ed•ly, adv.
heav′y-hand′ed•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.heavy-handed - lacking physical movement skills, especially with the hands; "a bumbling mechanic"; "a bungling performance"; "ham-handed governmental interference"; "could scarcely empty a scuttle of ashes, so handless was the poor creature"- Mary H. Vorse
maladroit - not adroit; "a maladroit movement of his hand caused the car to swerve"; "a maladroit translation"; "maladroit propaganda"
2.heavy-handed - unjustly domineering; "incensed at the government's heavy-handed economic policies"; "a manager who rode roughshod over all opposition"
domineering - tending to domineer

heavy-handed

adjective
1. oppressive, harsh, Draconian, autocratic, domineering, overbearing heavy-handed police tactics
2. clumsy, awkward, bungling, inept, graceless, inexpert, maladroit, ham-handed (informal), like a bull in a china shop (informal), ham-fisted (informal) She tends to be a little heavy-handed.
clumsy efficient, gentle, competent, graceful, skilful, adept, adroit, smooth, effectual, dexterous

heavy-handed

adjective
1. Clumsily lacking in the ability to do or perform:
2. Lacking fluency or gracefulness:
Translations

heavy-handed

[ˌhevɪˈhændɪd] ADJ
1. (= clumsy, tactless) → torpe, patoso
2. (= harsh) → severo

heavy-handed

[ˌhɛvɪˈhændɪd] adj (clumsy, tactless) → pesante; (harsh, person) → che ha la mano pesante, severo/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Many intertextual references exist in the story, especially with the school production of Hamlet, in which Max, Fish, and their friend, The Monk, perform in order to heavy-handedly reiterate to the reader Max's feelings of haunting, deception, and mania.
Butter is not used as heavy-handedly as you would think, and eating croissants with butter is a strict no-no.
Eric Schneiderman may have heavy-handedly compelled companies to consider and/or adopt DNA testing, but with the passage of time--and the sky hasn't fallen yet--the dietary supplement industry is now left to solidify best practices and implementation of this emerging technology.
In the Mediterranean port city, some English fans suggested that French riot police had reacted heavy-handedly and been quick to fire tear gas.
Other works reflect a concern with technology's incursion into the biological realm, such as the vaguely unsettling B) ALT, 1997, in which images of the artist's face morph into the form of his infant grandson and vice versa, and Dolly Animation, 1998, a meditation on the first cloned mammal that opens, somewhat heavy-handedly, with an image of a priest.
Amenabar resorts to familiar imagery - hooded devil worshippers, ritualistic sacrifice, inverted crosses - and heavy-handedly signposts his true intentions, dissipating any mystery or suspense that might be generated by various hallucinations and flashbacks.
Here, Amenabar resorts to familiar imagery - hooded devil worshippers, ritualistic sacrifice - and heavy-handedly signposts his true intentions, dissipating any mystery or suspense that might be generated by various hallucinations and flashbacks.
Sansal is perhaps most well-known for his The German Mujahid, which somewhat heavy-handedly conflates Islamists and Nazis.
For Gale it was a moment to savour as it will be when he lifts the trophy at the home of cricket 12 months after being denied the chance when the ECB heavy-handedly suspended him for two matches over an altercation with Ashwell Prince.
Another young person made the point that parents should police their children more, but not heavy-handedly, just more as a friend.
Jarvis is particularly exercised by certain tenets of post-colonial theory that have at times been deployed rather heavy-handedly to decode travel writings as adjuncts of racism, imperialism and tools of cultural supremacy.
The collaborators of "My Dinner With Andre" and "Vanya on 42nd Street" don't illuminate Ibsen's difficult hothouse of a play, now rather heavy-handedly titled "Fear of Falling," and Jonathan Demme, stepping in where Louis Malle usually helmed, seems constricted and uninspired.